salmon

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

As a number of commercial salmon fisheries around the state kick off this week, the outlook for ex-vessel prices is looking good. Fishing economists say between lower run forecasts and strong foreign and domestic demand, commercial fishermen will likely see higher prices this year. But that doesn’t necessarily mean commercial fishermen will earn more this season compared to last year.   

Andy Wink with Wink Research and Consulting said although prices vary by species and region, most fisheries should see stable or higher prices this year.

KBBI News

The Copper River commercial sockeye fishery is likely to fall below forecast for the second year in a row. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game closed one of the fishery’s 12-hour openings last week due to low escapement and abysmal harvest levels.

That trend continued this week with a slow fishing period on Monday, and the department announced Wednesday that it’s closing the fishery on Thursday for the second week in a row.

KBBI News

The sockeye run on the Copper River is off to an incredibly slow start. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game opened the fishery on May 17 for a 12-hour fishing period.

Gillnetters came home with roughly 1,900 sockeye and returned on Monday for another opening, but fishing still remained slow with only 3,400 fish winding up in nets.

Fish and Game biologist Jeremy Botz said those numbers are well under what the department expected.

Courtesy of the Alaska Humanities Forum

The Alaska Humanities Forum announced 16 new additions to its Alaska Salmon Fellows program last week. Two Homer residents were selected for the second round of the program. Homer City Council member and Gulf Watch Alaska Science Coordinator Donna Aderhold was among those selected throughout the state. Homer commercial fisherman Catie Bursch and Kenai Peninsula Borough Land Manager Marcus Mueller were also on the list.

Fish and Game

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council formed a committee Thursday to explore management options for salmon in the federal waters of Cook Inlet. The court-ordered move comes after the council lost a lawsuit in 2016 against an industry group. The lawsuit first began in 2013 after the council gave control of federal salmon fisheries in Cook Inlet to the state. Here’s NPFMC council member Glenn Merrill.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Earnings from commercial fisheries on the Kenai Peninsula have been going down in recent years according to the 2018 Kenai Peninsula Borough Comprehensive Draft Plan.

The plan, released in December, states that fishery earnings declined from 2013 to 2016 and cites research from the Commercial Fisheries Entry Commission. Total revenue from fisheries on the peninsula during that time decreased from roughly 150 to 90 million dollars. Craig Farrington is a researcher at the commission and said smaller earnings are likely due to less salmon.

KBBI News

Every good fish story seems to be based in the past, and as most fishermen will tell you, the fish were bigger way back when. But in the case of chinook, or king salmon, that actually seems to be the case. At the turn of the twentieth century, you can find photographs of fishermen holding up massive king salmon, now, not so much. But a recent study published in Wiley Online Library may have an idea as to why kings up and down the West Coast are shrinking.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Salmon runs in Prince William Sound are predicted to be average or below average in 2018.

 

For seiners, wild pinks are expected to come in about 20 percent under the 10-year average for even years, but Alaska Department of Fish and Game Area Management Biologist Charlie Russell said hatchery fish are expected to pick up some of the slack.

Dip-Netting Open on Kasilof, Kenai Rivers

Jul 12, 2016
Jenny Neyman

The Kenai River personal-use dip net fishery opened Sunday on a high point. Not only was the weather sunny and warm, but unusually high numbers of sockeye salmon greeted participants of the resident-only fishery.