Renee Gross

Reporter/Host
Ryan Oles/Flickr

The Homer Fire and Police Departments responded to an accident Monday evening around six p.m. A vehicle rolled over on the east end of Beluga Lake and the driver suffered serious injuries. He was medevacted to Anchorage and his name was not released. 

Renee Gross, KBBI News

The tsunami warning on Tuesday sent people along the Gulf of Alaska scrambling to find higher ground. In Homer, residents evacuated to the north side of Pioneer and over 60 people waited out the warning in the South Peninsula Hospital and Homer High School.

Chuck Hagen was asleep at his home on Bay Avenue when he realized something was wrong.

“I heard the sirens going and I turned the radio on and it said a tsunami was coming this way,” he said.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The City of Homer may have its first marijuana cultivation facility next December. Dan Coglianese and Janiese Stevens, owners of Alaska Loven It, applied for a standard marijuana cultivation license to operate out of a 5,000 square foot building on Kachemak Drive.

Coglianese said they’re aiming to offer better quality cannabis than other facilities by testing out their product out before selling it.

Renee Gross, KBBI News

This weekend, the Women’s March is returning to cities all across the country. In Homer, this nonpartisan event will focus on women’s rights and getting out the vote.  To prep for the march, community members made over 90 signs at the Old Inlet Bookshop.

Almost a dozen women hovered over pieces of cardboard in the backroom of the bookstore. Jan Agosta’s sign was bright pink, yellow and purple.

Homer Tribune/Cindy Barker

Internet is a basic commodity for most of U.S. consumers, but some remote Alaskan towns like Point Hope on the Chukchi Sea are just getting connected to the digital world. Other rural towns in Alaska have surprisingly been connected nearly as long as their peers in the Lower 48. 

The internet came to Homer in 1995, but it wasn’t a large internet provider that broke into the rural Alaskan market, it was a 20-year-old college student that saw the business opportunity.

Renee Gross, KBBI News

The National Center for Biomedical Research and Training taught nearly 40 emergency responders this week on how to handle an active shooter situation. The three-day course began with lectures, but increasingly became more hands on and cumulated with an active shooting simulation. The center, which partners with the Department of Homeland Security, is housed at Louisiana State University but provides trainings all over the country free of charge.

Fire Chief Bob Painter applied for the training to come to Homer.

Michele Smith Vasquez

In honor of the #MeToo movement, nearly twenty women gathered at the Soldotna Library for a panel discussion on sexual harassment and abuse Tuesday night. Many Voices, a local social justice group organized the get-together.

The panel, which included two doctors, pastors and an advocate, discussed destigmatizing experiences of abuse. Clinical Physiologist Dr. Pamela Hays said she sees survivors’ shame run deep:

HERC

The Homer City Council held a work session with the Park, Arts, Recreation and Culture Advisory Commission Monday to discuss the future of the Homer Education and Recreation Complex, also known as the HERC.

The city has debated what to do with the former school for years as bringing the building up to code and maintaining the building becomes more expensive.  Still, a vocal part of the community fights to keep it open, noting the importance of a recreational space.

Courtesy of Davin Holen.

Last week the Trump administration proposed to drastically increase the amount of Alaska waters open for oil and gas leasing. Along with keeping Cook Inlet open, it would also make areas near Kodiak and the Gulf of Alaska available for drilling, both of which are currently closed. Yet, it’s unclear if companies will be interested in drilling there even if the plan is approved. Still, the move worries local environmentalists and fishermen.

Marilyn Sigman

Throughout her former job as the director of the Center for Alaska Coastal Studies, Marilyn Sigman, saw how climate change was affecting the state. But instead of researching how climate change might develop in the future, she decided to look to the past, specifically at how Kachemak Bay’s climate has changed over time and how people have adapted. Her book “Entangled: People and Ecological Change in Alaska’s Kachemak Bay” is coming out on February 15th. Renee Gross sat down with Sigman to talk more:   

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