Ocean Acidification

Red dots showing SeaFET sensor deployment sites in Kachemak Bay.Credit Courtesy of Amanda KelleyEdit | Remove

In just a couple of weeks, researchers will be collecting the first batch of data from a new system monitoring ocean acidification in Kachemak Bay.

Courtesy of Andrew McDonnell

Scientists have been trying to find ways to reduce our carbon dioxide emissions for decades, but the scientific community has also been studying natural ways the earth stores carbon, preventing it from being released into the atmosphere. The largest natural storage container for carbon is the ocean, and new details are emerging on how waters near the equator are sending carbon-rich material into the deep ocean and diverting it from the atmosphere.

Scientists have known for some time that the ocean stores a lot of carbon, essentially acting as the world’s thermostat.