Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Thursdays 9:00-10:00 a.m.

The Peabody Award-winning "Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen," from PRI and WNYC, is public radio’s smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt Andersen introduces you to the people who are creating and shaping our culture.

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Podcasts

  • Thursday, February 22, 2018 12:00pm
    Kurt Andersen looks into how the Lincoln Memorial became an American Icon. Sarah Vowell discusses the battle over Lincoln's memory, which lasted for three generations. Dorothy Height, a veteran of the Civil Rights Movement, recalls witnessing Marian Anderson's historic concert there in 1939, and hearing Martin Luther King Jr. declare "I have a dream" in 1963. And a former White House aide sets the record straight on Richard Nixon's infamous 4 a.m. trip to the Lincoln Memorial, where he met with student protesters there to denounce the Vietnam War.
    Actor David Strathairn reads the Gettysburg Address, which is engraved on the Memorial, for Studio 360.





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  • Thursday, February 15, 2018 11:00am
    Irish actress Denise Gough tells Kurt about her lean years before her two big breakout roles in London — both of which came to New York. A listener named Sam Cook left the church, but his love of Christian rock remains. In 1963, “The First Family” broke new ground for comedy by openly mocking — and impersonating — a sitting president. And finally Kurt talks with Melissa Spitz, who took to Instagram to document — and better understand  — her mentally ill mother.







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  • Thursday, February 8, 2018 11:00am
    Kurt talks with Ruth Carter, the costume designer who recreated historically accurate clothing for period pictures like “Malcolm X,” “Selma,” and “The Butler,” but for “Black Panther” came up with a bold look for the future. Randy Levin is one of those Billy Joel obsessives who even has recordings of Joel when he played in a psychedelic rock band in the 1960s, but after Levin had kids, he heard one familiar Joel song in a new — and profound — way. Comic Sans is the most hated font, hands down, but Jessamyn West likes it and says you should, too. And John McWhorter tells Kurt why he hates the book that every writer and nitpicky grammarian loves: “The Elements of Style” by Strunk and White. 

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  • Thursday, February 1, 2018 11:00am
    The musical children of musical stars. Sean Lennon on growing up with John and Yoko. Rosanne Cash’s surprising musical guilty pleasure. Joshua Redman on his fellow saxophone player — and father — Dewey Redman. And a performance from Rufus Wainwright. 



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  • Tuesday, January 30, 2018 11:00am
    Even in this increasingly fragmented media age, the Super Bowl is one of those rare television events that really captures the country. Nearly one in three Americans -- more than 100 million -- tunes into the game. And while the NFL viewership in past eras has been overwhelmingly male, that’s no longer true: for the Super Bowl, nearly half of television viewers are women. 
    And yet, commercials that air during the Super Bowl are infamous for their retrograde, sexist portrayals of women. But in this year of Me Too, will commercials finally reflect a more enlightened view of women? Jeanine Poggi from AdAge joins Kurt to review some of more sexist spots from recent Super Bowls -- and a few feminist moments. 
    Poggi says that advertisers -- and their agencies -- should be on notice.
    “Any advertiser who this year goes into the Super Bowl with an ad that’s showing women half-dressed or any of the stereotypes we’ve seen in the past, like the nagging woman,” Poggi says, “will get a lot of blowback.”


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In 2016, more than 20 percent of homeless people over age 50 were living in shelters, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. And that figure doesn’t include people living on the streets.

There have been thousands of spills from oil and gas pipelines in the U.S. over the past decade. When the Keystone XL, or any big transmission line, spills, it gets attention from the federal government and the public.

But in states like Ohio and Pennsylvania, thousands of miles of smaller pipelines are being built, connecting drilling well pads to the larger energy distribution system.

Lindsey Vonn won the bronze medal in the women’s downhill at the Winter Olympics in South Korea. Meanwhile, the U.S. men’s hockey team is out of the tournament.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR’s Russell Lewis (@NPRrussell) in Pyeongchang.

Walmart had strong holiday sales, but in its latest quarter, it reports online sales growth slowed. Walmart has made major investments in e-commerce to challenge Amazon.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi) about the company’s progress so far.

Academy Award-wining director, writer and animator Nick Park‘s new film “Early Man” pits cavemen versus Bronze Age-men in an epic soccer match.

“Being a non-soccer fan, I was really trying to make just an entertaining family comedy that happens to have soccer as a kind of a — you know, it’s an underdog prehistoric sports movie,” Park says.

Interview Highlights

On where the idea for “Early Man” came from

How Analog Audio Recording Lives On

Feb 19, 2018

It wasn’t that long ago that the things we heard on air — through speakers, through headphones — were recorded, edited and played back on magnetic tape, reel to reel, and later on cassettes. But, today, sound recording has totally changed and tape technology has all but been abandoned. Or, so one would think.

The U.S. women’s hockey team advanced to the gold medal final with a 5-0 win over Finland.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti gets an update on all of the Olympic action in Pyeongchang from NPR’s Russell Lewis (@NPRrussell).

How One New York School Thwarted An Attack

Feb 16, 2018

Following the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead, many are asking what could have been done to stop it from happening.

Some attacks have been thwarted before they were carried out. Here & Now‘s Robin Young finds out about one such instance in New York from Ruschell Boone (@RuschellBoone), a reporter with NY1.

NPR national security editor Phil Ewing (@philewing) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss a federal grand jury indicting 13 Russian nationals for interfering with the 2016 U.S. election.

Comic book and superhero fans in the U.S. are anxiously awaiting the opening of Marvel’s “Black Panther” in theaters Friday. Early reviews call it “exhilarating,” but also “groundbreaking.” That’s because “Black Panther” stars a black superhero.

Texas Standard’s Laura Rice (@LauraRiceKUT) reports from Austin.

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