Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Thursdays 9:00-10:00 a.m.

The Peabody Award-winning "Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen," from PRI and WNYC, is public radio’s smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt Andersen introduces you to the people who are creating and shaping our culture.

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Podcasts

  • Thursday, August 17, 2017 12:00pm
    Some of our favorite recent stories about books and the people who make them. Kurt talks with Claudia Rankine about capturing what racism really feels like in “Citizen: An American Lyric,” and to Helen Oyeyemi about her very un-Disney re-imagining of Snow White. The writer Sadie Stein defends the word “moist” against all those who get the heebie-jeebies saying it. And the novelists Richard Russo and Jenny Boylan talk about the big plot turns in their books – and in their friendship. 


  • Thursday, August 10, 2017 12:00pm
    Some of our favorite recent stories about music.What drove Carrie Brownstein to actually punch herself in the face when she was on tour with Sleater-Kinney, the haunting beauty and artistry of the “Twin Peaks” score, and Shamir plays insanely catchy music live in our studio.


  • Thursday, August 3, 2017 12:00pm
    Herman Melville's white whale survived his battle with Captain Ahab only to surface in the works of contemporary filmmakers, painters, playwrights and musicians. Kurt Andersen explores the influence of this American Icon with the help of Ray Bradbury, Tony Kushner, Laurie Anderson and Frank Stella. Actor Edward Herrmann is our voice of Ishmael and Mark Price narrates David Ives's short play Moby-Dude.
  • Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:00pm
    How many f-bombs and gun shots determine a movie’s rating? Howard Fridkin reveals the process of rating movies. Plus, how Native Americans shaped rock and roll history, and a live performance by NPR Tiny Desk Contest winners Tank and the Bangas. 



  • Wednesday, July 19, 2017 8:00pm
    This is the novel about racism that America couldn't ignore.



Doctors are warning spectators not to look directly at the sun without protection during Monday’s eclipse. It can cause permanent damage like solar retinopathy or blindness, especially for people outside the path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dr. Nhung H. Brandenburg, president of the Georgia Optometric Association, about how to view the eclipse safely.

How Did North Korea Get Nuclear Weapons?

Aug 17, 2017

In an interview with The American Prospect, White House strategist Steve Bannon said “there’s no military solution” to North Korea’s growing nuclear weapons program. Going against President Trump’s threat of “fire and fury,” Bannon suggested Trump should tone down the brinkmanship with North Korea and focus on China instead.

But how did North Korea get its nuclear weapons in the first place?

Attacker Drives Van Into Barcelona Crowd

Aug 17, 2017

A white van jumped up onto a sidewalk and sped down a pedestrian zone Thursday in Barcelona’s historic Las Ramblas district, swerving from side to side as it plowed into tourists and residents.

NPR’s Camila Domonoske (@camilareads) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with the latest.

With reporting from The Associated Press

President Trump is placing blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend on “both sides,” including counter-protesters. But what is true about what happened that day?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sarah Rankin (@sarah_rankin), a reporter for The Associated Press who was in Charlottesville that day.

A new study in Kentucky is raising alarms about teens’ mental health in the state. The biannual Kentucky Incentives for Prevention survey found that 8.2 percent of Kentucky high school sophomores had attempted suicide in the past year. For sixth graders, that rate was 4.2 percent. The study found increases in every age group it looked at.

There have been five mass extinction events in the history of the Earth. In his book “The Ends of the World,” author Peter Brannen looks at what happened to cause these crises — from massive volcanic eruptions to asteroids — and tries to determine what our future might bring.

In a few weeks, teenagers will stumble bleary eyed and yawning into middle and high schools to beat that early morning bell. But in California, that could change by 2020. That’s if the state legislature passes a bill next month which would require all middle and high schools to open at 8:30 a.m. or later.

In Seattle, where thousands of employees drive to work every day, parking can be a nightmare. But some companies and organizations — pushed by state and local government — are working to reduce the number of solo-car commutes by charging for parking by day, instead of on a monthly basis.

On Aug. 21, most North Americans will see at least a partial solar eclipse. But people in 12 states — in a 70-mile-wide swath from Oregon to South Carolina — will experience a total eclipse. The schedule is known with precision, but how do we know all this and when did we first know it?

Suspended Fox News host Eric Bolling has initiated a $50 million lawsuit against HuffPost reporter Yashar Ali, after Ali released a report last Friday claiming Bolling sent unwanted, inappropriate text messages to female colleagues at Fox News in the past.

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