Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Thursdays 9:00-10:00 a.m.

The Peabody Award-winning "Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen," from PRI and WNYC, is public radio’s smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt Andersen introduces you to the people who are creating and shaping our culture.

Ways to Connect

Podcasts

  • Thursday, December 7, 2017 12:00pm
    New York Times theater critic Jesse Green and playwright Paul Rudnick join Kurt to discuss groundbreaking gay theater over the past 50 years. How will plays like “Angels in America” and “Torch Song Trilogy,” which are being revived, hold up for today’s audiences, and what’s the future hold for plays about the LBGT community? Plus, Barry Blitt, the illustrator whose work is frequently featured on the cover of The New Yorker, gives Kurt a tour of his work studio -- and some insights into how he creates his brilliant and hilarious illustrations.

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  • Thursday, November 30, 2017 5:32pm
    Illustrator and political cartoonist Barry Blitt is best known for his New Yorker covers. Over the past three decades, he’s paired his signature ink and watercolors with his dry wit. This past fall he published a beautiful coffee-table book that’s a retrospective of his most memorable work. 
    Blitt invited Studio 360 to meet him at his home in Connecticut—which happens to be the former home of Arthur Miller—for a walk-though of his home studio, creative process, and some of his most iconic illustrations. “What you're looking for is life in the line” he says about finding his finished product, “sometimes you'll do a drawing that doesn't look enough like Hillary and you draw it a second time the second time it looks more like her but the first time there was some magic or discovery in the actual line work and it's better drawing and that's the one you use.”

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  • Thursday, November 30, 2017 9:00am
    Generations of Americans have grown up with Walt Disney shaping their imaginations. In 1955, Disney mixed up some fairy tales, a few historical facts, and a dream of the future to create an alternate universe. Not just a place for fun, but a scale model of a perfect world. “Everything that you could imagine is there,” says one young visitor. “It's like living in a fantasy book.” And not just for kids: one-third of Walt Disney World’s visitors are adults who go without children. Visiting the parks, according to actor Tom Hanks, is like a pilgrimage—the pursuit of happiness turned into a religion.

    Futurist Cory Doctorow explains the genius of Disney World, while novelist Carl Hiaasen even hates the water there. Kurt tours Disneyland with a second-generation “imagineer” whose dead mother haunts the Haunted Mansion. We’ll meet a former Snow White and the man who married Prince Charming—Disney, he says, is “the gayest place on Earth. It’s where happy lives.”

    (Originally aired October 18, 2013)

    Special thanks to Julia Lowrie Henderson, Shannon Geis, Alex Gallafent, Nic Sammond, Steve Watts, Angela Bliss, Todd Heiden, Shannon Swanson, Katie Cooper, Nick White, Marie Fabian, Posey Gruener, Jason Margolis, Chris DeAngelis, Jenelle Pifer, Debi Ghose, Maneesh Agrawala, and Tony DeRose.

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  • Wednesday, November 22, 2017 8:28am
    This week, a triple header from the series American Icons, which focuses on works of art that changed the way we think about America.
    First is Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Scarlet Letter”: his 1850 novel about a woman being shamed for having an affair. Anna Sale produced this Icon segment in 2013, before starting her hit podcast Death, Sex and Money. Just four years later, her interpretation of the classic novel resonates very differently in 2017, as the country grapples with how to define consent and sexual misconduct.

    Cole Porter’s “Anything Goes,” on the other hand, celebrates the opposite tendency in American culture: the devil-may-care slide towards looser morals. And in “Untitled Film Stills,” Cindy Sherman captured the way that being a woman—or maybe being a person—is just playing a role.






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  • Thursday, November 16, 2017 11:23am
    Alec Baldwin, who these days may be best known for his depictions of President Trump on “Saturday Night Live,” joins Kurt to discuss how he has played many villains in his career, and their points of view might best be summarized by the words of the “Boss Baby” character he voices: “I poop. They wipe. I’m the boss.” Filmmaker Taika Waititi, who is best known for his low-budget comedies like “Eagle vs. Shark,”  talks about how he managed to inject his dry wit, and knack for improvisation into his  big-budget superhero movie,  “Thor: Ragnarok.” And Eve Ewing joins Kurt to talk about the many hats she wears: poet, sociologist, artist and Twitter star.

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Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill (@JohnHMerrill) talks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about his support for Roy Moore, who is running for a seat in the U.S. Senate and battling accusations of sexual misconduct with teenage girls when he was in his 30s.

Interview Highlights

On what kind of turnout he’s expecting

California Fires Continue To Spread

9 hours ago

Firefighters made progress over the weekend in their effort to contain most of the fires in Southern California, but the Thomas Fire continues to grow. Now the fifth-largest in modern California history, the Thomas Fire began in Ventura County and has since crossed into Santa Barbara County, where it threatens the coast.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Lance Orozco (@KCLUNEWS), news director at KCLU, about the latest.

People across the country move to the desert because of the warm winter weather. Desert conditions also bring major auto companies looking to test out brand new cars.

KJZZ’s Casey Kuhn (@CaseyAtTheDesk) reports how Arizona’s test tracks are a major part of the car business.

Tax Prep Advice For The End Of 2017

9 hours ago

With the end of the year coming, tax experts are advising clients how to maximize their deductions — and there could be big changes coming with the pending tax law.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the report with CBS News’ Jill Schlesinger (@jillonmoney), host of “Jill on Money” and the podcast “Better Off.”

The off-Broadway hit “Spamilton,” which spoofs Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton,” is closing in New York, but there is a U.S. tour in the works, and plans for a possible run in London.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks backstage, with the show’s creator, Gerard Alessandrini (@ForbiddenGerard).

Fires in Southern California have now broken out in northern San Diego County, in the rural towns of Bonsall and Oceanside. The Lilac Fire has destroyed buildings and evacuations are underway.

John Sepulvado (@JohnLGC) of KQED joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson with the latest.

This year marked major anniversaries for some of the most beloved works of classical music, from George Frideric Handel’s “Water Music” suite, first performed 300 years ago, to the 125th anniversary of “The Nutcracker” suite.

There is a vast trove of Hollywood gold 160 feet below Kansas City, Missouri.

It’s inside a underground warehouse, where several hundred thousand film canisters line the towering shelves at Underground Vaults & Storage.

“As far as the older titles, ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ‘Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,’ ” says manager Brian Corwin.

Minnesota Democratic Sen. Al Franken announced Thursday that he will resign from Congress, following multiple accusations of sexual harassment.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest with NPR’s Jessica Taylor (@JessicaTaylor).

President Trump on Wednesday declared Jerusalem the capital of Israel, and announced the U.S. would eventually move its embassy to the contested city.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti discusses the latest with NPR’s Michele Kelemen (@michelekelemen).

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