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Coming out at work, in context

Fri, 2014-11-21 09:11

This past week, the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest LGBT rights organization, released its Corporate Equality Index which measures how Fortune 500 companies treat lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender employees in the workplace.

Things have changed a lot over the 10-plus years the group has released its annual report. Same sex marriage is now legal in more than thirty states, there are more rights for LGBT people in the workplace, and many big businesses have increased their protections for employees, introducing non-discrimination clauses, and partner benefits. This year, 366 Fortune 500 companies got a perfect score on the index, up from only 13 in 2002. 

Deena Fidas, director of Workplace Equality for the HRC, says the change is based in societal shifts and finances. "So many businesses have come to the realization that being an LGBT inclusive employer isn't just the right thing to do, it's actually smart business," she says.

But despite new workplace protections and benefits, "still, a little over half of all lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender workers in this country remain closeted on the job," Fidas says, "and so quite literally people are getting married on the weekends and not talking about it come Monday morning." 

In 29 states, there are still no legal protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Legal issues definitely come into play in the decision to be out at work, Fidas says "but it's also the everyday environment." HRC survey responses indicated that LGBT people who aren't out at work feared that they'd make people uncomfortable. 

But staying closeted on the job may have some drawbacks, for LGBT and the companies they work for. Fidas says that people who aren't out at work may be less engaged with their jobs and their colleagues, and less likely to stay with one employer. Not being out at work could also mean fewer opportunities to make friends, or find valuable mentorship. 

Even millennials, typically known for their openness about sexuality, are aren't always out at work. "We find that actually, many of the youngest workers are out to their friends and family, they're out in their school environments, and yet they're going back in the closet when they get their first jobs," Fidas says.

For younger workers, the question to come out is a conundrum: they may feel they lack an established professional background, or be searching for a mentor, and want to keep their orientation private.

"Your mentor is somebody who you can confide in, you can talk about personal struggles," Fidas says, "and this is where we get into a bit of a Catch-22." The people who might most need guidance are often afraid to seek it out. One solution to this issue is something that many businesses are introducing: LGBT and allied affinity groups. "[They] provide a tremendously effective platform for young people to find a mentor," Fidas says. 

Some LGBT people are not just out at work, but out on their resumes. Fidas says that some people choose to come out in a resume because they want to highlight leadership experience that involves an LGBT affiliated group. Others choose to come out on a resume, subtly or explicitly, as a way to communicate their expectations to a potential employer that they are completely accepted at work. 

A recent study from Princeton University shows that things are changing for people who do choose to come out in their resume. While past research indicated that mentioning an LGBT group resulted in hiring and salary discrimination, the latest from Princeton shows that for white men, there's little to no impact, and for black men, coming out on a resume may actually result in more interviews and a higher starting salary. 

Still, there's no single, simple solution. "Bias happens," Fidas says, "whether it's conscious or unconscious."

A lot goes into the decision to come out and be out at work. Fidas says it isn't the right choice for everyone, particularly if their workplace doesn't have a nondiscrimination clause. "It's a conversation," she says.

 

What's with the addiction to subscription boxes?

Fri, 2014-11-21 06:49

The DIY movement notwithstanding, many people are so desperate to shed chores they’ve started outsourcing even frivolous shopping. It’s a situation caused by and, in turn, fueling a big retail trend: subscription boxes.

Even if you think you’ve never heard of subscription boxes, you probably have. Years ago, we knew them as the fruit- or cheese-of-the month club. Now they’ve gone upscale, niche – and run amok. 

There are subscription boxes for vegans and carnivores, for the gluten-free and gluten loaders, for people who can’t get enough ostrich jerky or infinity scarves, for preschoolers who insist on sustainably sourced toys – maybe as many as 500.

At this point in the game – about four years since the launch of Birchbox, the beauty-sample site credited with starting the recent surge – almost any American, and her finicky pet, could survive on boxes alone.

Somehow, a nation that endlessly whines about household clutter, and is so prickly about presents that there’s a registry for every gift-giving event, has started paying strangers to pick out — excuse me, curate — random items and ship said items to their homes.

And on those glum days when the mailbox is empty, junkies can fill the void with box-centric YouTube videos, blogs, reviews and discussion boards.

One theory to explain the phenomenon is that we have too much choice – it’s a relief to let someone else paw through all of the junk for you.  Another is that exhausted working women want a gift every month – even if it’s one they’ve sent, and paid for, themselves. Even if they don’t actually like it.

 Oh, really, I shouldn’t have . . .

Subscribers take their deliveries so seriously that blogs warn of “spoilers” before discussing the contents of a particular box. It’s like learning the gender of your unborn baby, only the reveal involves small-batch pistachios.

Recently, I flirted with a fashion box but luckily the realization that I’d end up schlepping to return clothes I didn’t choose in the first place kicked in before I'd entered my credit card.

But there is one box I’d love: a subscription that takes a box of stuff from your house every month. Call it the disappearing box.

The subscription box that should be

Fri, 2014-11-21 06:49

The DIY movement notwithstanding, many people are so desperate to shed chores they’ve started outsourcing even frivolous shopping. It’s a situation caused by and, in turn, fueling a big retail trend: subscription boxes.

Even if you think you’ve never heard of subscription boxes, you probably have. Years ago we knew them as the fruit- or cheese-of-the month club. Now they’ve gone upscale, niche — and run amok. 

There are subscription boxes for vegans and carnivores, for the gluten-free and gluten loaders, for people who can’t get enough ostrich jerky or infinity scarves, for preschoolers who insist on sustainably-sourced toys—maybe as many as 500.

At this point in the game — about four years since the launch of Birchbox, the beauty-sample site credited with starting the recent surge — almost any American, and her finicky pet, could survive on boxes alone.

Somehow, a nation that endlessly whines about household clutter, and is so prickly about presents that there’s a registry for every gift-giving event, has started paying strangers to pick out — excuse me, curate — random items and ship said items to their homes.

And on those glum days when the mailbox is empty, junkies can fill the void with box-centric YouTube videos, blogs, reviews, and discussion boards.

One theory to explain the phenomenon is that we have too much choice--it’s a relief to let someone else paw through all of the junk for you.  Another is that exhausted working women want a gift every month — even if it’s one they’ve sent, and paid for, themselves. Even if they don’t actually like it.

Oh, really, I shouldn’t have . . .

Subscribers take their deliveries so seriously that blogs warn of “spoilers” before discussing the contents of a particular box. It’s like learning the gender of your unborn baby, only the reveal involves small-batch pistachios.

Recently I flirted with a fashion box, but luckily the realization that I’d end up schlepping to return clothes I didn’t choose in the first place kicked in before I’d entered my credit card.

But there is one box I’d love: a subscription that takes a box of stuff from your house every month. Call it the disappearing box.

Student data and school attendance

Fri, 2014-11-21 06:35

Schools are gathering data on kids, and as student databases grow, so does the ability of technology to predict how or what a kid might do next.

Marketplace's Adriene Hill has been looking at the ways student data is being used to see into the future, and spoke with David Brancaccio to talk about efforts to predict, and change, attendance patterns.

Quiz: Have you seen your kid’s data?

Fri, 2014-11-21 04:36

A majority of states gather data on students over time in longitudinal databases, according to the Data Quality Campaign, but not all of them guarantee parents access to that information.

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Aereo files for Chapter 11 reorganization

Fri, 2014-11-21 04:15

On Friday, the beleaguered television-streaming service Aereo announced it would file for Chapter 11 reorganization. Founder and CEO Chet Kanojia wrote in a blog post that doing so would, "permit Aereo to maximize the value of its business and assets without the extensive cost and distraction of defending drawn out litigation in several courts."

It's been a long journey since the cloud-based television streaming company got started three years ago—Aereo's promise to change the way we watched television was immediately met by a lawsuit brought on by major TV networks.

Aereo celebrated some victories: this year, when ABC's live-stream of the Oscars failed where Aereo's succeeded. But ultimately, a 6-3 vote from the Supreme Court found that the company violated federal copyright law by retransmitting copyrighted programs without paying a fee. In other words, the court didn't buy Aereo's technological argument.

The company was considered a favorite among cord cutters—people who favor streaming services over cable—and there's been a rise in networks jumping on the streaming bandwagon since Aereo lost in the high court. And in the wake of the Supreme Court's decision, there have even been companies looking to take Aereo's place.

 

Gauging the crush of college debt, major by major

Fri, 2014-11-21 03:00
11

Beleaguered TV-streaming company Aereo announced Friday it would file for Chapter 11 reorganization. When asked about his company's lasting impact, CEO and founder of Aereo Chet Kenojia said: “I think we struck a chord in a lot of people’s hearts that there was something arcane about how television was distributed and watched.”

25 percent

That's the portion of earnings college graduates typically devote to paying off student loans in their first year out of school. That number comes from the Hamilton Project, which has just released new data on income and loan payments in the years after college. They found different fields see very different paths to repayment. The New York Times' Upshot is hosting their new debt calculator.

2 hours

That's the window Comcast gives customers waiting for a visit from a technician, though it's not clear how consistently they arrive in that timeframe. The company says their new app, expected out next year, will alert subscribers when service is 30 minutes away. The Verge notes the company might have bigger problems though, as reported in the four-part "Comcast Confessions" series.

25 percent

The portion of the world's sapphire Apple uses in its iPhone screens and camera lenses. The company build a $1 billion facility in Arizona for supplier GT Advanced Technologies to produce the material. But GT completely imploded not long after, finally filing for bankruptcy last month.  The Wall Street Journal takes a deep dive into just what went wrong, and the "promise and peril" of supplying iPhone parts.

6 percent

Research shows that granting legal status to immigrants increases wages by 6 percent, creating spillover benefits for many. That's especially good news for cities like Detroit, where immigration is viewed as one of the few tools available to bring the city's economy back from the brink.

Gauging the crush college debt according to major

Fri, 2014-11-21 03:00
11

Beleaguered TV-streaming company Aereo announced Friday it would file for Chapter 11 reorganization. When asked about his company's lasting impact, CEO and founder of Aereo Chet Kenojia said “I think we struck a chord in a lot of people’s hearts that there was something arcane about how television was distributed and watched.”

25 percent

That's the portion of earnings college graduates typically devote to paying off student loans in their first year out of school. That number comes from the Hamilton Project, which has just released new data on income and loan payments in the years after college. They found different fields see very different paths to repayment. The New York Times' Upshot is hosting their new debt calculator.

2 hours

That's the window Comcast gives customers waiting for a visit from a technician, though it's not clear how consistently they arrive in that timeframe. The company says their new app, expected out next year, will alert subscribers when service is 30 minutes away. The Verge notes the company might have bigger problems though, as reported in the four-part "Comcast Confessions" series.

25 percent

The portion of the world's sapphire Apple uses in its iPhone screens and camera lenses. The company build a $1 billion facility in Arizona for supplier GT Advanced Technologies to produce the material. But GT completely imploded not long after, finally filing for bankruptcy last month.  The Wall Street Journal takes a deep dive into just what went wrong, and the "promise and peril" of supplying iPhone parts.

6 percent

Research shows that granting legal status to immigrants increases wages by 6 percent, creating spillover benefits for many. That's especially good news for cities like Detroit, where immigration is viewed as one of the few tools available to bring the city's economy back from the brink.

PODCAST: Predicting truancy

Fri, 2014-11-21 03:00

First up, China's central bank this morning surprised market players by dropped two key interest rates to stimulate the economy. More on that. Plus, student loan debt has topped $1 trillion, with less than 10 percent in private debt, i.e. not through the federal government. Those private lenders have been pressured to work with struggling borrowers to modify the terms of their loans. Now, it seems Wells Fargo has heard that message. And speaking of students, schools are gathering data on kids, and as student databases grow, so does the ability of technology to predict how or what a kid might do next. We take a look at the ways student data is being used to try to see into the future to predict, and change, school attendance . 

Cutting interest rates on student debt

Fri, 2014-11-21 02:00

Wells Fargo has launched a loan modification program for student loan customers who are delinquent on their loans or facing a new financial hardship.

The bank’s John Rasmussen estimates, 600 to 1,000 borrowers will qualify to have their interest rates cut by the end of 2015. He says the company wants to have long-term relationships with its customers.

Kevin Jacques, a professor at Baldwin Wallace University, says the program makes financial sense, too, since it may mean borrowers will continue to make payments instead of defaulting. 

For more on this story, click the media player above.

Inflating art ... No, not Koons' balloon animals

Fri, 2014-11-21 02:00

In honor of Marketplace's 25th anniversary, we're looking at some of the surprising ways prices have changed over the last quarter century.

Today, we're looking at art. Specifically, the prices of art considered so fine it's worth millions. 

Blake Gopnik is critic-at-large for Artnet News, and a contributor to the New York Times. He joined us to talk about thinking of art as an investment, and how some works have seen their value jump by 700 percent in 25 years.

Click the media player above to hear Blake Gopnik in conversation with Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio.

For troubled Detroit, could immigration help?

Fri, 2014-11-21 02:00

On Thursday evening, President Barack Obama announced a plan to use his executive authority to roll out major reforms to the nation’s immigration policy.

Among other things, the action offers temporary legal status to some 5 millions illegal immigrants, along with an indefinite reprieve from deportation.

In the Midwest, immigrants have been sought after as a way to sustain metro economies winnowed by decades of out-migration.

Earlier this year, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan sent a letter to President Obama to earmark 50,000 visas for workers agreeing to live in Detroit.

Immigration is viewed as one of the few tools available to bring Detroit’s economy back from the brink.

“Immigrants, including those who don’t have a formal education, can really be important to the labor force and to sustaining and revitalizing Detroit neighborhoods,” says Steve Tobocman, Director of Global Detroit, and economic development non-profit.

Tobocman says immigration reform could help reverse the trends of population loss and a rapidly aging workforce. Other outcomes would directly affect future workers.

“It could have a huge impact is on kids,” says Sherrie Kossoudji, an economist at the University Of Michigan School Of Social Work.

“One of the things some of us have always argued is that immigration reform could be on the biggest anti-poverty programs we’ve ever had.”

Kossoudji says granting legal status has been show to increase wages by 6 percent, creating all kinds of spillover benefits for families, consumer spending and tax revenue.

 

 

Silicon Tally: Tweetin' Turkey

Fri, 2014-11-21 02:00

It's time for Silicon Tally! How well have you kept up with the week in tech news?

This week, we're joined by Marty Van Ness, supervisor of the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, for a food-themed Silicon Tally.

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How immigration reform can change immigration

Thu, 2014-11-20 15:45

On Thursday evening, President Obama announced his executive order for immigration reform:

We’re going to offer the following deal: If you’ve with been in America more than five years. If you have children who are American citizens or illegal residents. If you register, pass a criminal background check and you’re willing to pay your fair share of taxes, you’ll be able to apply to stay in this country temporarily without fear of deportation. You can come out of the shadows and get right with the law. That’s what this deal is.

Now let’s be clear about what it isn’t. This deal does not apply to anyone who has come to this country recently. It does not apply to anyone who might come to America illegally in the future. It does not grant citizenship or the right to stay here permanently, or offer the same benefits that citizens receive. Only Congress can do that. All we’re saying is we’re not going to deport you.

To get a little context on how the President's plans might affect some of the various immigration constituencies in this country, we spoke with Barbara Hines, Co-Director of the Immigration Clinic and professor at the University of Texas, and Emily Lam, vice-president of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group for Health Care & Federal Issues.

McDonald's is not lovin' GMO potato

Thu, 2014-11-20 14:58

The United States Department of Agriculture has approved a new genetically-modified potato.

Among other things, the new spud is supposed to give off fewer carcinogens when cooked at high temperatures, like when it's french-fried. Still its biggest potential customer, McDonald’s, is not lovin’ it.  The burger-and-fries giant seems to be listening to the many consumers out there who worry GMOs are bad for them.  Never mind the Big Mac itself. 

New York University food researcher Marion Nestle has seen this kind of thing before in England. Supermarket chains opted out of carrying tomato paste made from genetically-modified tomatoes.

"The retailers said, ‘You know, we don’t have a dog in this fight. We don’t need to be in the middle of this,’" Nestle says. "Similarly, McDonald’s has plenty of potatoes."

So the company doesn’t need these new potatoes, just like it doesn’t need any new grief from consumers about serving unhealthy food.

Meanwhile, consumer attitudes have changed about what makes food healthy or not. Analyst Harry Balzer has been tracking Americans' eating habits for decades, at consumer-research company NPD.

"I think the move is to, 'I want natural foods' — whatever natural, means to you," he says. "Now, I think part of that process is, 'I don’t want you to make my foods better for me. So, don’t remove the fat, don’t remove the sugar. That way you’re changing the food — you’re altering the food.’"

Balzer says sales of foods designed to be healthy — lower in fat, or lower in sugar — have been declining for years.

He also says the three most-ordered restaurant items are still soda, a burger and fries.

But even if that’s what we’re ordering, health is still — well, call it an aspiration.

Mary Chapman is with the food-industry consulting group Technomic, which polls consumers about their preferences. "We asked specifically, 'Do you want restaurants to offer healthy items, even if you’re not going to eat them?'" she says. "They still want them offered."

So is it the presence of the salad on the menu that makes us feel better about the Big Mac that we're actually ordering?

"It’s true," she says.

As long as the salad isn’t genetically modified.

Firefox Says Goodbye to Google, Hello to Yahoo

Thu, 2014-11-20 13:21

If you are a user of the web browser Firefox in the United States, your default search engine is about to change. Mozilla, the nonprofit that owns Firefox just announced plans to switch the default from Google to Yahoo.

Google was paying Mozilla $300 million a year for the privilege of being the default search engine. Those payments made up more than 80 percent of Mozilla’s income. 

Mozilla and Google are very different companies. Mozilla is a mission-driven nonprofit for starters. It's  built on 10 principles, one of which is "individual’s security and privacy on the internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional.”

Google has a slightly different take on privacy. "Google is of course, in the business on tracking users," says USC computer science professor Ellis Horowitz, "and Firefox has taken a very strong line on giving users the ability to not be tracked."

In its deal with Firefox, Yahoo has agreed to honor Mozilla’s "do not track" policy. In return, Yahoo gets all of Firefox’s default search traffic and some street cred with users who are concerned about their privacy. Just how much Yahoo paying is for that traffic and street cred hasn't been made public.

As for Google, it ultimately isn't losing a whole lot. "Many people just have the Google home page as the default page, so they don't really need the search engine to do their searching," says Horowitz.

Plus Google has its own competing browser, Chrome, which now has a much larger market share than Firefox’s. And as more and more web traffic shifts to mobile phones, Firefox has created its own mobile operating system. "The firefox OS which they call it, they are getting onto low cost phones around the world," says Liz Gannes, a senior editor with the tech site Re/code.

"Mozilla in some sense, has already moved on from the Firefox battle in that they are trying to take on the next big closed platform, which is mobile."

What an influx of legal workers might mean

Thu, 2014-11-20 12:00

This country has 11 million undocumented workers give or take, according to the Pew Research Center, and workers without papers make up 5 percent or so of our labor force.

It’s a varied group, but large numbers of them rent rather than own, speak English poorly and live at 150 percent of the poverty line. That translates to around $18,000 a year for an individual, or roughly $36,000 for a family of four.

(Courtesy of: Migration Policy Institute)

This group works largely “in the hospitality industry, in construction and in places with agriculture,” Audrey Singer of the Brookings Institution says. “But people would be surprised at the variation that is behind those numbers.”

So what happens if and when many of them get permits to work legally? The Migration Policy Institute figures a change could affect upwards of 3.7 million people, freeing them to chase better jobs.

(Courtesy of: Migration Policy Institute)

“As people get legal status they are going to be more mobile,” the institute’s deputy director, Marc Rosenblum, says. “There are some unauthorized immigrants who are unable to change jobs, because they don’t have proof of work eligibility. It’s difficult to quit a job and look for another one.”

Legal working papers can also give workers confidence to bargain for higher wages, Rosenbaum says.

In a study of people who got new green cards, the only people who moved up the wage ladder had high-skills. Less than one in five do, says Laura Hill of the Public Policy Institute of California.

“It was really the high skilled workers who were able to translate this new status into better paying jobs,” institute senior fellow Laura Hill says. “The lower skilled unauthorized workers, which are the majority, were not able to make the transition.”

If that’s an indication, only those with good skills and English may be emboldened by work papers. And any change may be temporary. It would come via executive order, which means the next president could move in and press the “undo” button.

UC proposes to raise tuition every year for 5 years

Thu, 2014-11-20 11:00

The University of California is about to get a lot more expensive.

After a three-year tuition freeze, the UC Board of Regents approved a plan today that would raise prices by as much as 5 percent a year for the next 5 years, unless the state comes up with more funding. That would ultimately push tuition well past $15,000 a year. 

The reason? UC President Janet Napolitano says state funding hasn’t kept up with rising costs.

Ten years ago, the state covered about 60 percent of a UC student’s tuition, according to an editorial in the Los Angeles Times. Families were on the hook for about 40 percent. Now, it’s the other way around.

“In the last decade, tuition has doubled for California students,” says Michele Siqueiros, president of the Campaign for College Opportunity.

She says there’s good reason for taxpayers to invest more in higher education.

“College-educated Californians earn more money, pay more taxes and use less of the social service costs that the state has to spend,” she says.

After years of steep cuts, the state has increased funding for higher education in the last few years. According to the university, the increases are not enough to keep up with growing demand for a college education in the state. Napolitano says the increases will allow the university to admit 5,000 more California students.   

All over the country, states face higher health care and pension costs, says John Douglass, a senior research fellow at the Center for Studies in Higher Education at UC Berkeley. So there’s less money to go around.

“Legislators and governors are making lots of choices as to, well, how much can we really invest in higher ed when we have all these other obligations?” he says.

Most states have started restoring some of the deep cuts made during the recession, says Andy Carlson of the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association.

“The recovery is definitely happening at a much slower pace, and there’s certainly continued budget pressures,” he says.

Consumer advocates worry that could make college less accessible for low-income and middle-class students.

According to Jacob Jackson, a research fellow with the Public Policy Institute of California, extra financial aid has – so far – kept costs for those families roughly the same.

“Students from low-income families are largely insulated from these tuition increases,” he says. “But only if they apply for and receive federal financial aid.”

University of California approves tuition increase

Thu, 2014-11-20 11:00

The University of California is about to get a lot more expensive.

After a three-year tuition freeze, the UC Board of Regents approved a plan today that would raise prices by as much as 5 percent a year for the next 5 years, unless the state comes up with more funding. That would ultimately push tuition well past $15,000 a year. 

The reason? UC President Janet Napolitano says state funding hasn’t kept up with rising costs.

Ten years ago, the state covered about 60 percent of a UC student’s tuition, according to an editorial in the Los Angeles Times. Families were on the hook for about 40 percent. Now, it’s the other way around.

“In the last decade, tuition has doubled for California students,” says Michele Siqueiros, president of the Campaign for College Opportunity.

She says there’s good reason for taxpayers to invest more in higher education.

“College-educated Californians earn more money, pay more taxes and use less of the social service costs that the state has to spend,” she says.

After years of steep cuts, the state has increased funding for higher education in the last few years. According to the university, the increases are not enough to keep up with growing demand for a college education in the state. Napolitano says the increases will allow the university to admit 5,000 more California students.   

All over the country, states face higher health care and pension costs, says John Douglass, a senior research  fellow at the Center for Studies in Higher Education at UC Berkeley. So there’s less money to go around.

“Legislators and governors are making lots of choices as to, well, how much can we really invest in higher ed when we have all these other obligations?’” he says.

Most states have started restoring some of the deep cuts made during the recession, says Andy Carlson with the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association.

“The recovery is definitely happening at a much slower pace, and there’s certainly continued budget pressures,” he says.

Consumer advocates worry that could make college less accessible for low-income and middle-class students.

According to Jacob Jackson, a research fellow with the Public Policy Institute of California, extra financial aid has—so far—kept costs for those families roughly the same.

“Students from low-income families are largely insulated from these tuition increases,” he says. “But only if they apply for and receive federal financial aid.”

Netflix is king of bandwidth in North America

Thu, 2014-11-20 11:00

The latest figures from the Canadian networking company Sandvine show Netflix accounts for 35 percent of all the bandwidth usage during peak periods in North America.

As Quartz points out, there are a few caveats to the data. For one, "peak periods" means mostly at night when we're home watching stuff. Also, the report doesn't account for internet usage on cell phones.

Netflix's closest competitor is YouTube, which accounts for about 14 percent of the bandwidth. Not to mention it clobbers other video streaming services like Amazon Video (2.58 percent) and Hulu (1.41 percent).

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