National / International News

Baby mammoth goes on display in UK

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:45
A perfectly preserved baby mammoth which died 42,000 years ago has been unveiled at the Natural History Museum in London.

D-Wave: Is $15m machine a glimpse of future computing?

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:37
Is $15m machine a glimpse of future computing?

'Record' year for financial disputes

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:37
The amount of consumer-related financial disputes reached a record in the year to March, according to the Financial Ombudsman.

How to drive firms to global success

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:35
Why the patient approach wins the race for success

VIDEO: How to win in the global race

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:34
What's the best way for bosses to lead their companies to success on a global stage?

'Large' fire hits Camden Market

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:34
Hundreds of people are evacuated from the Stables Market in Camden, north London, after a fire breaks out.

10 ways to cool the housing market

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:30
10 ways to take the heat out of housing

Thai Army Declares Martial Law But Says It's No Coup

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:25

After six months of anti-government protests and the ouster of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, the army says it is needed to "keep peace and order."

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VIDEO: How to make Anglo-Iranian music

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:23
Composer Soosan Lolavar on Stay Close, her bid to combine Western and Iranian music in a classical composition.

Farage defends Romanian comments

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:08
Nigel Farage defends controversial remarks he made about Romanians, saying people would be right to be concerned if a group moved in next door.

The pool where Tarzan was a lifeguard

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:03
The pool where Tarzan was a lifeguard

MPs warn of probation shake-up risks

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:02
Changes to the probation service, which will see most work contracted out, carry "significant risks", MPs warn.

Mobile phone child health risk probe

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-19 15:00
A major investigation into whether mobile phones and other wireless technologies affect children's mental development is getting under way.

Credit Suisse Pleads Guilty To Helping U.S. Tax Evaders

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 14:59

The Swiss bank has agreed to pay $2.5 billion in penalties to U.S. authorities for helping Americans use tax havens to hide from the IRS.

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GM doesn't want employees using these words in memos

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 14:16

A quick follow-up to last week's story about the $35 million fine General Motors is going to pay for not telling the truth about its ignition switch problems.

As part of the document dump related to that case, there's a PowerPoint presentation about how to describe the recall process. Words employees were never to use? "Grenadelike," "Kevorkianesque," "widow-maker," and "rolling sarcophagus," and more:

U.S. Coast Guard Calls Off Atlantic Search For 4 British Sailors

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 14:08

The U.K.'s most famous yachtsman has joined families of the missing crew members of a 40-foot sailboat in urging that the search resume. The yacht disappeared Saturday.

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Task Force Says Asking All Patients About Suicide Won't Cut Risk

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:57

Suicide is a major cause of death, and there's no evidence that screening everybody will reduce the toll, a federal panel says. But doctors, family and friends can help, researchers say.

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A coffee plant disease threatens more than prices

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:37

Farmers and harvesters in Central and South America have been hit hard by Roya, or "coffee rust," a fast-spreading fungus that infects the leaves of coffee plants. Roya has caused an estimated $1 billion in damage, and threatened the livelihoods of more than half a million families from Mexico to Peru.

"Entire fields have just been devastated by the rust," said Jonathan Rosenthal, executive director of Cooperative Coffees, who saw the impact of the rust in Honduras. "The trees have turned to skeletons. It's like a ghost town." 

The U.S. is stepping up its efforts to help eradicate the disease, partnering with Texas A&M's World Coffee Research Center. Coffee farming has lifted many families in Central and South America out of poverty. USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah says the organization's Feed the Future program has connected thousands of coffee growers to companies including Starbucks and Peet's. In some cases, Shah said, those farmers have seen their yearly incomes double or triple. He warns that as families fall into poverty, they become increasingly susceptible to the influence of drug traffickers and gangs.

"They prey upon communities that are poor, where lots of children are hungry, and they offer them an illicit income opportunity by producing drugs and selling drugs," Shah said. 

Fungicides are able to treat the blight, but many small farmers can't afford them. 

"The fungicide requires investment; the tools that are used to apply the fungicide require investment," said Lindsey Bolger, vice president of coffee sourcing and excellence for Keurig Green Mountain. "In some cases, these farmers just don't have the resources that they need." 

U.S., Nigeria Reach Deal On Intelligence Sharing

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:34

The U.S. will now provide intelligence analysis to Nigeria in an effort to find the more than 200 girls kidnapped by the militant group Boko Haram.

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Unpacking the AT&T-DirecTV deal

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:29

Over the weekend, AT&T announced it plans to buy DirecTV for $48.5 billion. That is, of course, pending approval from federal regulators that are already busy sorting out a different telecommunications merger: Comcast’s bid to buy Time Warner Cable.

“Big fish are swallowing small fish,” says Reed Hundt, former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, of the changing media landscape. “And if you want to avoid being swallowed, you need to be a bigger and bigger fish.”  AT&T, which is primarily a wireless provider, wants to diversify – to be able to sell customers phone service, internet access, and television.

And its advantage in selling regulators on the deal? Its size. "In terms of the pay TV business," says Todd Rethemeier of Hudson Square, "AT&T is a relatively small player."

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