National / International News

Who will win the 2014 Masters?

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 10:19
Experts including Paul Azinger, Ken Brown and Peter Allis reveal who they think will win the 2014 Masters, which starts on Thursday

VIDEO: MPs' expenses under the spotlight

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 10:19
The prime minister says MPs' expenses rules have been improved since 2010, but says there is more to do to "reassure the public".

UN 'failed to stop Darfur attacks'

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 10:14
UN peacekeepers failed to protect civilians in Sudan's Darfur region, even when they were shot in front of them, a former UN spokeswoman says.

Man cleared of PC Blakelock killing

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 10:12
Nicholas Jacobs is cleared of killing police officer Keith Blakelock during riots at Broadwater Farm, north London, in 1985.

PM defends MPs after Miller quits

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 10:08
David Cameron defends Parliament after Maria Miller's resignation but Labour say he does not "get" public anger.

Pistorius feels bite of 'bull terrier'

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 10:08
South African prosecutor takes on Oscar Pistorius

What's your type?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-09 10:04
Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 16:55 http://helvetica-the-perfume.myshopify.com/

Someone loved Helvetica so much, they made it into a perfume.

The break-up of a graphic design duo has resulted in a lawsuit of $20 million – over fonts. Tobias Frere-Jones and Jonathan Hoefler worked together for 15 years to create some of the most famous and ubiquitous fonts around– used by GQ, Martha Stewart, the New York Jets and Saturday Night Live. They won awards for their typefaces - before the relationship turned sour. So now we want to know: How much do you care about fonts? Take our survey! (function(){var qs,js,q,s,d=document,gi=d.getElementById,ce=d.createElement,gt=d.getElementsByTagName,id='typef_orm',b='https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/share.typeform.com/';if(!gi.call(d,id)){js=ce.call(d,'script');js.id=id;js.src=b+'widget.js';q=gt.call(d,'script')[0];q.parentNode.insertBefore(js,q)}})()Marketplace for Thursday April 10, 2014by Sally HershipsPodcast Title What's your type?Story Type News StorySyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

Aircraft makes emergency landing

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:58
A pilot escapes serious injury after his light aircraft is forced to make an emergency landing in a field in Aberdeenshire.

VIDEO: Charge your smartphone in 30 secs

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:55
New technology means you could charge your empty mobile phone battery in 30 seconds.

Murder inquiry into death of baby

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:48
Police begin a murder investigation following the death of a baby who was critically injured in east Belfast last month.

In Turnaround, More Moms Are Staying Home, Study Says

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:41

The number of "stay at home" moms in the U.S. has been on the decline for decades. But a newly released Pew Research Center survey shows a 6 percent increase from 1999 to 2012.

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Detroit Reaches Bankruptcy Deal With Some Bondholders

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:40

The plan shifts $100 million to pension funds and resolves one of the record bankruptcy's most contentious issues.

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Tebbitt's shooting jibe 'shocking'

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:36
Sinn Féin criticises a Conservative peer for saying that he hoped Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness would be shot in the back for attending a state banquet hosted by the Queen.

'Too few top-table women' - Labour

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:35
Labour claims David Cameron has downgraded women in his mini-reshuffle prompted by Maria Miller's resignation.

When the coal layoffs trickle down

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:25
Friday, April 11, 2014 - 06:40 Lorri Shundich

Kae and David Fisher opened their store in downtown Whitesburg last year.  

Coal communities in eastern Kentucky are feeling the effects of a relentless wave of mining layoffs the past few years. Competition from cheap natural gas and high production costs have hurt the mining business here. That, in turn, is hurting Main Street.

Take Whitesburg, Kentucky, population 2,000 give or take. At the Railroad Street Mercantile, owner Kae Fisher surprises visitors with an eclectic mix of merchandise. Homemade jellies, aromatherapy oils, snack chips, and jalapeno eggs fill the shelves. In the back of the store, she’s selling used LP’s and consignment quilts.

“These are from ladies across the county who try to earn a little extra money because a lot of them, their husbands have lost their jobs,” says Fisher.

Fisher and her husband David opened their “corner market” last year, as mining employment in eastern Kentucky plunged. Inauspicious timing, but Fisher believed the downtown needed at least one store. “We’re able to pay the bills,” says Fisher. “But have we got our money back that we’ve invested? Not yet.”

A midday stroll down Main Street, Whitesburg can be a lonely experience. The courthouse is the busiest place in town, but tables at the Courthouse Cafe across the street are fairly empty. On a weekday afternoon co-owner Laura Schuster worked the kitchen by herself. She can’t afford an assistant right now. “Once the layoffs started we immediately knew what would happen, that people would be afraid that they also would lose their jobs and they would cut back anyway they can,” says Schuster. “And one way to cut back is to not eat out. I’d say business is down 50 percent, if not more.”

Whitesburg and other coal towns in the region are also suffering from a steep drop in coal tax revenue. The money goes to counties and was originally intended for an economy beyond coal. In Whitesburg’s Letcher County, coal tax revenue is half what it was just a few years ago.

Jason Bailey, director of the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy, says over the years coal severance taxes have been diverted for other uses. “Local governments in eastern Kentucky have gradually become dependent on the coal severance as just a general fund source for operations,” says Bailey “For them to pay for police, to do basic road repair. So they’ve had a really hard time because there’s the lack of a tax base outside that as well to generate revenue.”

Justin Maxson, president of the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development, says the transition to a “low-coal” economy will be “slow, hard and expensive.” He points out the region was poor, even while coal boomed. “So there will be no easy fix.”

Marketplace Morning Report for Friday, April 11, 2014 Lorri Shundich

Kae and David Fisher opened their store in downtown Whitesburg last year.  

Check out all our Coal Play stories.

Lorri Shundich

Laura Schuster, co-owner of the Courthouse Cafe in Whitesburg, KY, says business is down 50 percent, if not more.

by Sarah GardnerPodcast Title When the coal layoffs trickle downStory Type FeatureSyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

Google invests in more robots

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:23
Google's investment arm has taken a financial stake in a robot-maker that is seeking to disrupt the service industry.

Iran 'won't give up nuclear plans'

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:12
Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei backs negotiations with world powers but warns Tehran will never give up its nuclear plans.

The loaded meaning behind 'What do you do?'

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:08

Jim and Deb Fallows of the Atlantic continue their travels across the United States, in partnership with Marketplace. This week, the Fallows are taking a break from exploring different towns across the country to examine something we all do – introduce ourselves.  

Or more precisely, they're examining the thing we say right after we introduce ourselves. It’s different in every part of the country.

In New York or D.C., the first question after an introduction is often “What do you do?” – meaning, what’s your job? But careful asking that question in Burlington, Vermont, says Fallows. People are more likely to respond, “I ski or I run a lot or I have a little boat.”

Deb Fallows says “It’s a question that matters. It’s something we say all the time." She was caught off guard when, in Greenville, South Carolina, she was asked what church she went to. In cities like Chicago or Boston, it’s not uncommon for people to ask "Which parish do you live in?" In midsized cities, it's often "Where did you go to high school?"

Fallows says the questions are meant to tease out socioeconomic status, political viewpoints, and cultural background.

“You know that somebody’s kind of digging for information to put you into their world – how do you fit into my world?

Debate: In An Online World, Are Brick And Mortar Colleges Obsolete?

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-09 09:00

Proponents of online education say it's flexible and economical. But skeptics say "college by Internet" is a pale substitute for real-world exchanges with instructors and peers inside the classroom.

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Homophobic gesture footballer guilty

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-09 08:34
A footballer who made a homophobic gesture to Brighton fans is found guilty of using abusive or insulting behaviour, in a landmark legal case.
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