National / International News

In West Africa, Fewer New Ebola Cases But Epidemic Still Uncontained

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:55

Robert Siegel speaks with Brice de le Vingne, director of operations dealing with the Ebola outbreak for Doctors without Borders.

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Aussie Hewitt gets Queen's wildcard

BBC - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:48
Four-time champion Lleyton Hewitt is given a wildcard to the 2015 Aegon Championships in his last grass-court season.

Kenji Ekuan's Enduring Legacy Lives On Restaurant Tables

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:47

Ekuan created the red-capped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle in 1961 and also designed the bullet train which connects Tokyo and northern Japan, among other things. He died this weekend at the age of 85.

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Alabama Joins 36 States In Allowing Same-Sex Marriage

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:31

Same-sex couples in the conservative state married for the first time on Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block a federal judge's ruling that struck down the state's gay marriage ban.

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Obama, Merkel Downplay Disagreement Over Ukraine Aid

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:26

With the Ukraine crisis spiraling, President Obama and Germany's leader Angela Merkel met in Washington, D.C.

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Gitmo Trial For Sept. 11 Suspects Resumes — Then Abruptly Halted

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:26

The trial of five men accused in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks resumed on Monday at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and then was abruptly halted. Defendants in the case protested that one of the court interpreters at the hearing had been present years before at secret sites where the men had been held and, they claim, tortured. The judge ordered a recess to look into the matter.

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Authorities Probe Alleged Hate Crime Against Native American Kids

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:26

Racial tensions are high in Rapid City, S.D. as police investigate an incident where white men allegedly shouted racial slurs and dumped beer on a group of Native Americans at a recent hockey game.

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Los Angeles Residents Divided Over Proposed $15 Minimum Wage

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:26

Los Angeles is considering raising its minimum wage from $9 to $15 an hour in order to help its 800,000 residents in poverty. But no major city has yet raised its wage this dramatically and this fast.

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Q&A: Sen. Ed Markey On Protecting Data Our Cars Are Sharing

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:26

We've entered the age of Internet-connected cars, and the Massachusetts lawmaker says they're vulnerable to all kinds of data breaches.

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VIDEO: Wife's quest to free captive soldier

BBC - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:25
Fierce fighting has continued in eastern Ukraine despite ongoing efforts to broker a ceasefire between pro-Russian rebels and government troops.

Auto security? What security?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:19

A report released Monday says the security protocols in connected cars aren't nearly secure enough. It's yet another example of the basic dilemma posed by the Internet of Things: how to connect more devices to each other and the Internet, while making them easy to use, technologically innovative and  private and secure. 

Cars with wireless systems connected to the Internet are vulnerable to hacking and data theft, according to the Senate report, which found that auto-industry security measures are "inconsistent and haphazard." 

"Every time you add a new point of connectivity to a device, you have increased the attack surface — more ways to gain access," says Steve Checkoway, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute. Checkoway participated in experiments in 2010 that showed how vulnerable cars can be. 

Automakers are designing cars with the same kinds of wireless connectivity technologies that consumers have come to expect from their daily digital devices. Accordingly, cars are becoming subject to the same growing pains facing computers and smartphones – in addition to featuring digital door locks and thermostats.

Silicon Valley is grappling with a delicate balance: Keeping these products easy to use while implementing enough security to keep customers comfortable with using them.

"The out-of-the-box experience when you start up a product [is that] when you unpackage it, put it on the wall, it needs to be very seamless," says Tom Kerber, who heads research into the Internet of Things at Parks Associates. If customers have to grapple with too many steps to implement security protocols, Kerber says, they will reject products instead of adopting them.

In the meantime, Silicon Valley is churning out connected products based on the same model it used to churn out computers and apps. "Innovation in Silicon Valley is all about iteration and experimentation," says analyst Frank Gillett of Forrester Research.

Experimentation tends to mean that products aren't fully cooked when they come to market, he says. "So the idea is: Figure out the minimum viable product that will let you experiment with an idea, develop it and see if there's something there, and then figure out how to improve it, iterate it, make it better," Gillett says.

While companies often think about security when first releasing a product, their process of improving a product after launch means security is often playing catchup, he says, and that model is not likely to change soon.

Average tax refund so far this year is about $3,500

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:16

The Internal Revenue Service said Friday that the average refund so far this year is running at $3,539.

So two things:  First, who's got their taxes done already? Because, cut it out! You're making the rest of us look bad.

And secondly, you know that when you get a refund you've basically given the government an interest-free loan, right?

Right?

 

 

Changing fortunes of nightly news shows

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-02-09 12:09

Brian Williams, the host of NBC Nightly News, is embroiled in a scandal over fabricated stories he told about experiences during the invasion of Iraq in 2003. He's taken a leave of absence from the show.

But just how important is an anchor like Williams to a news network in an era of declining network news viewership?

NBC took a ratings hit last week, according to preliminary numbers from Nielsen. It was a big dip, at 36 percent, but declining viewership for network news isn’t exactly, well, news. Fewer and fewer sets are tuned to these broadcasts after reaching a peak in the 1980s.

Is the evening-news tradition becoming irrelevant in this new era of 24/7 information? Or do the networks see a good reason to continue their investment? Williams' show, after all, is still a major source of ad revenue for NBC.

For more, click on the audio player above.

HSBC Helped Clients Hide Millions, News Report Says

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:53

The Washington-based International Consortium of International Journalist's story was based on documents leaked in 2008. HSBC says it ended those practices starting that year.

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Son's Rare Cancer Leads Family On Quest For Cure

NPR News - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:52

When a child falls ill with cancer, many of the drugs that might help are either experimental or unapproved for use in kids.

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Charge after mugging of disabled man

BBC - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:37
A man is charged with assaulting disabled pensioner Alan Barnes in Gateshead, for whom £300,000 was subsequently raised in donations

Good cop, bad cop

BBC - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:36
Is there an irreparable fissure between the US and Europe over what to do about Ukraine ?

King brands EGM decision outrageous

BBC - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:31
Shareholder Dave King has criticised the Rangers board over their decision to hold the club's EGM in London.

What if Greece really does leave eurozone?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:30

The man they’re calling “the rock star of anti-austerity” rocked financial markets Monday. Yanis Varoufakis — the new Greek finance minister — sent bank shares reeling on the Athens stock exchange with his comments on the euro.

Over the weekend, he warned that the eurozone would collapse if his country is forced out of the currency union by Germany’s refusal to accept a renegotiation of the terms of Greece’s bailout. Varoufakis said he believes that if Greece left the eurozone, investors will pull their money out of other heavily indebted euro countries – forcing them to leave too. With its biggest export market – the rest of Europe – then in turmoil, Germany could be the biggest loser.

Yangon's architecture under threat

BBC - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:30
The battle to preserve Yangon's architecture

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