National / International News

Deadly clashes at Ukraine port base

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:58
Three people are killed in a raid on a base in eastern Ukraine, the country's interior minister says, as the US, Russia, the EU and Ukraine hold crisis talks in Geneva.

Women held in school fraud inquiry

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:50
Four women are arrested in connection with an on-going fraud investigation at a Birmingham school.

Earthquake shakes East Midlands

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:40
A 3.2 magnitude earthquake that hit the East Midlands is being investigated by geological experts.

VIDEO: Speedy bird remains on the run

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:39
A large bird that looks similar to an ostrich and can run at a speed of up to 40mph is on the loose in the Home Counties after it inexplicably escaped from a field.

Bale targets Real Madrid treble

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:39
Gareth Bale wants to win the treble with Real Madrid after scoring a "really special" winner in the Copa del Rey final.

Artists have unique brain structure

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:35
Artists' brains are structurally different to non-artists in areas relating to fine motor movements and visual imagery, a study finds.

How is the Co-operative Group run?

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:27
Why both Labour and Co-op Bank would be happy with a divorce

Marathon speed crackdown in Belgium

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:17
There is a huge response to a speeding crackdown in Belgium, with thousands of people participating.

Court clears ex-Anglo bank boss

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:12
The former chairman of Anglo Irish bank has been found not guilty of illegally supporting the bank's share price, the jury continues to deliberate in the case against two others.

Blind spot: VC and minority business

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:03

Before a company sells for billions of dollars, it starts as an entrepreneur's big idea. Typically, somewhere in between are venture capitalists, who invest in startups with hopes of a hefty payday if the companies make it big. A recent study from researchers at New York University’s Stern School of Business and University of Munich shows VCs are more likely to back companies if the executives are the same ethnicity as the investors.

The findings have profound implications for entrepreneurs of color, though they don't come as a surprise to them. At the South by Southwest Interactive Festival recently, African-American entrepreneur Wayne Sutton recalled times he appeared at conferences and was mistaken for a member of the service staff.

“It’s hard enough just to try to launch a product that the world can use,” Sutton says. “But overcoming those biases as a minority entrepreneur is even double hard.”

The research supports what many minority startups have long believed, that investors have a tendency to back people who look like them. Entrepreneurs of color see the problem as one of investors afraid to step beyond what they know.

“A venture capitalist provides money, but also provides a lot of blood, sweat and tears,” explains Melissa Bradley, an African-American who started a venture capital firm after seeing firsthand how finding investors can be frustrating for minorities and women. “They’re there with you day in and day out and so there’s this implicit nature around if I have something in common with you already at the onset, that we’re probably gonna do pretty well down the road.”

Bradley says she’s raised tens of millions for minority and female-owned businesses and profited.

Both Bradley and Sutton say minority entrepreneurs shouldn’t despair. Both believe in the power of a great idea to break through, no matter who pitches it.

Deepak Hegde, the NYU management professor who co-authored the study, agrees. He adds that the findings may point to changes VCs could make.

“Startups tend to come from multiple communities,” Hegde says. “A venture capitalist that has a diversity of partners in its ranks might be in a better position to identify these opportunities and evaluate them better.”

After all, the last thing investors want is a billion dollar opportunity missed, lost in a blind spot.

Mark Garrison: That’s a venture capitalist investing in a startup on the HBO show “Silicon Valley.” Everybody around the table is white. The real Silicon Valley is also heavy on white guys. Minority company founders often go unrecognized, or worse.

Wayne Sutton: It’s like, what are you doing here? Or, go get me something to drink, because they think I’m working here or something.

Wayne Sutton has started companies and mentored entrepreneurs. As an African-American in tech, he’s not surprised by the study’s findings of a tendency for investors to go with people who look like them.

Sutton: It’s hard enough just to try to launch a product that the world can use. But overcoming those biases as a minority entrepreneur is even double hard.

Many American venture capitalists are white, so black entrepreneurs confront the problems the study uncovered daily. Melissa Bradley felt it firsthand when she pitched her business ideas.

Melissa Bradley: There was no one in the room that looked like me. There were no women and there were certainly no people of color in the room, oftentimes in the building.

That sometimes frustrating experience inspired her to start her own venture capital firm. She says she’s raised tens of millions for minority and female-owned businesses and profited. Bradley sees the larger problem as one of investors afraid to step beyond what they know.

Bradley: A venture capitalist provides money, but also provides a lot of blood, sweat and tears. And so they’re there with you day in and day out and so there’s this implicit nature around if I have something in common with you already at the onset, that we’re probably gonna do pretty well down the road.

Both Bradley and Sutton believe in the power of a great idea to break through, no matter who pitches it. Deepak Hegde, the NYU business professor who co-authored the study, agrees. He adds the findings may point to changes VCs could make.

Deepak Hegde: Startups tend to come from multiple communities. A venture capitalist that has a diversity of partners in its ranks might be in a better position to identify these opportunities and evaluate them better.

Because the last thing they want is a billion dollar opportunity missed, lost in a blind spot. I'm Mark Garrison, for Marketplace.

Dude, where's my flying car?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-17 01:00

With recent attitudes towards the tech industry sometimes bordering on chilly, Americans are surprisingly optimistic about what technology has to offer them in the next 50 years.

According to a new report published by the Pew Research Center, 59 percent of those surveyed thought that technology would lead to peoples' lives being generally better, though what most people hope for is a little different than the expectations of yester-year:

When it comes to health technology, a majority of Americans (81 percent) believe they will be able to receive a transplant of an organ that has been custom grown in a lab. That's not to say that there is general approval of high-tech healthcare: 66 percent of those surveyed think society would be worse off if parents could alter the DNA of their prospective children to create custom-designed wunderkinder.

The idea of robots taking care of the elderly was also met with disaproval; 65 percent thought this would be a change for the worse. Inspiring even less confidence is the prospect of one day being able to pull off this stunt (only 39 percent of Americans believe that scientists will achieve teleportation in the near future):

Among current hot topics (i.e. drones and Google Glass), 63 percent thought we would be worse off if drones were given permission to fly through U.S. airspace, and 53 percent thought it would also be a negative development if people wore devices that constantly showed them information about the world around them. 

In terms of that age-old expectation of flying cars, 19 percent of Americans said they would like to own a travel-related invention like said flying vehicle, but 50 percent said they would not ride in a self-driving car. Go figure.

In spite of skepticism surrounding certain aspects of technological advancement, the results of the study show that Americans' feelings are mixed-to-positive when it comes to how technology affects their lives -- Dystopian sci-fi aside, of course.

Rock band AC/DC are 'not retiring'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 00:43
AC/DC confirm they will continue making music, following news guitarist and founder member Malcolm Young is taking a break from the band due to ill health.

Ukraine: 3 Killed After Black Sea Base Attack

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-17 00:25

A crowd of around 300 men armed with stun grenades and Molotov cocktails attacked the base, in the south-east part of the country late Wednesday, the interior ministry said in a statement.

» E-Mail This

VIDEO: Getting boys back into books

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 00:15
Children's Laureate, Malorie Blackman, wants to get boys back into books.

VIDEO: Live coverage of Pistorius trial

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-17 00:01
Live coverage of the trial of South African athlete Oscar Pistorius, who denies the premeditated murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine's Day 2013.

Catholic Church refuses poll request

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-16 23:52
The Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales turns down a request by members for the results of a sexual ethics survey to be made public.

Welcome (back) to Beijing

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-16 23:49
The BBC’s new China editor on her return to Beijing

Reprieve for 18 NI care homes

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-16 23:42
All 18 NHS care homes in Northern Ireland that were earmarked for closure are to remain open while residents want to stay in them.

India votes on biggest polling day

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-16 23:37
Indians are voting in the biggest day of the general election, pitting the ruling Congress party against the main opposition BJP.

Charles Xue gets bail after illness

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-16 23:36
One of China's most influential bloggers, Charles Xue, is granted bail after months of detention because of a "serious illness", officials say.
ON THE AIR

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4