National / International News

Video Break: Soaring Through An Immense Vietnamese Cave

NPR News - Wed, 2015-03-18 09:21

American photographer Ryan Deboodt says he filmed Hang Son Doong on his third visit. The world's largest cave features a river and huge "skylights" that have allowed trees and wildlife to flourish.

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Yik Yak, privacy settings and the anonymous economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-03-18 09:16

In South by Southwest Interactive’s idea exchange, the goal is often trying to get some pattern recognition. Brands, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, academics — everyone is trying to get a sense of what is happening right now, and what is the Next Big Thing. Right now, data privacy is a huge issue. Over 100 events at Interactive tackle privacy as a topic, from drones to health care.

One of the week’s privacy-focused events was the release of a new login management system from Yahoo. The company is calling it an “on-demand password” system where, every time you want to login, you get a new code texted to your phone. For a company that has been pulling in user data — and fielding “change password” requests — for years this seems to make a lot of sense. But it’s also part of a larger recognition at Yahoo that users increasingly understand the value of data protection and control.

“It’s really important to provide our users with the tools and the ability to control what they share with us,” says Dylan Casey, a VP of products at Yahoo. “And, be as transparent as possible about what we do with it.”

Other people at Southby are here to talk about anonymity. For Yik Yak, one of the hot startups making an appearance at the festival, anonymity is a key feature. The app lets college kids share anonymous comments publicly with the entire campus community. There has been plenty of criticism leveled at Yik Yak for allowing racism, sexism, and worse to be posted without much accountability. Co-founders Tyler Droll and Brooks Buffington say they are combating that content by adding filters for certain language. But they tout the app for recently alerting students to a campus shooting nine minutes before the college’s emergency alert system. And their promise of anonymity for users is bringing in cash.

“The company's at about 35 people working on Yik Yak,” Droll says. “We've raised about 70 million dollars and we have a presence at just about every college campus in america.”

Yik Yak is one of many increasingly popular apps that offer anonymity as a big selling point. But many of these startups don’t have to worry about revenue yet. For Yahoo, Google, Facebook, and Amazon, data is an incredibly valuable resource. Which is probably why those larger companies are trying to offer more general controls and protection--not anonymity.

Is there a way to mine data and offer some anonymity to a growing number of users who don't want their email messages used for marketing ploys, or something worse? Security specialist at the company Rapid7 Nicholas Percoco says it depends on what you really want from your technology.

“By nature of using the device or service,” he says, “the benefit of that is that it’s tracking you.”  

Location based rewards, mapping, recommendations and more convenience based on the data we’re giving up is already here. And even if you do decide you do want anonymity as a user and are willing to do the work to get it, it might be a quixotic quest. Percoco says as time goes on, companies that pull in our data get bought and sold, along with our information. Take a bit from data column A and a bit from data column B, and a company, government or hacker can turn anonymity into your positive ID.

Oh, for the want of a decent copier

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:57

A lot of reporters use the Freedom of Information Act — FOIA — to request documents from the government.

Last year, I asked the State Department for copies of some correspondence related to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. And it took me a while to hear back.

I received a response last week. 

Evidently, there's a huge backlog at the State Department in the office that handles requests like mine, and we now know why.

An inspector general looked into the matter and provided an explanation: "The office lacks copy machines that can handle the volume required."

There aren't enough copy machines. At the State Department. In 2015.

 

US tennis player banned for 15 years

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:45
American tennis player Wayne Odesnik is banned for 15 years after being found guilty of a second doping violation.

Dallas Seavey Wins Third Iditarod in Four Years

NPR News - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:44

The 28-year-old Seavey finished the race early Wednesday. He completed the 1,100-mile sled dog race in 8 days, 18 hours, 13 minutes, and 6 seconds.

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DR Congo to expel African activists

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:34
The Democratic Republic of Congo government says it will deport four pro-democracy activists from Senegal and Burkina Faso arrested on Sunday.

Netanyahu's Campaign Puts Him On The Path To Confrontation

NPR News - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:33

If the Israeli leader follows through on his campaign pledges, he could face increased friction with the Palestinians, the Obama administration and the international community.

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Red Nose Day to make US debut

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:31
Red Nose Day is to make its debut on US television later this year.

New global fund for tobacco control

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:30
A new joint fund - launched by Bloomberg Philanthropies and Gates Foundation - will help poor countries defend legal challenges by the tobacco industry

VIDEO: The Bard in Motor City

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:21
Detroit's Shakespeare theatre company

Alarming Number Of Women Think Spousal Abuse Is Sometimes OK

NPR News - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:16

In many countries, more than a third of women think a husband is sometimes justified in beating his wife. Researchers say this attitude contributes to the high rate of domestic violence worldwide.

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Kuwait ends coup plot investigation

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:14
Kuwaiti prosecutors say a tape that appeared to suggest an attempted plot in 2013 to topple the government is a fake.

People won't believe Budget - Labour

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:10
Chancellor George Osborne delivered a "Budget people won't believe from a government they don't trust", Ed Miliband says.

VIDEO: Five problems for Netanyahu - 60 secs

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:05
A one minute look at five issues Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu must tackle if he is returned to office.

'Voices in head' arson mum jailed

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:04
A mother-of-two who claimed voices in her head told her to set fire to her home with her children inside is jailed after admitting arson.

Obama Picks Kentucky To Win NCAA Tournament, Mixes In Politics

NPR News - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:04

President Obama predicts Kentucky will be crowned college basketball champion and cap off a perfect season. He also picks three top seeds and one No. 2 seed to make the Final Four.

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American Express launches multi-brand loyalty program

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:02

A handful of the country’s biggest companies announced out a new loyalty program Wednesday. American Express is teaming up with Macy’s, ExxonMobile, AT&T, Hulu, and others to create a program that lets customers gather and redeem points across the group of merchants.

Traditionally, loyalty programs have been exclusive to one retailer – one card for the supermarket, another for the drugstore.

This program, called Plenti, is different in that it allows points gathered a one merchant to be redeemed at another, says Abeer Bhatia, CEO of U.S. Loyalty with American Express.

“Let’s say you walk into a Rite Aid and you pick up soda, band aids, and you go and check out,” explains Bhatia. “You’re going to earn points at Rite Aid and these points will accumulate in a common points bank and then when you go next time, maybe, to an ExxonMobil or Macy’s, you can use those points.”

Customers don’t have to pay with an American Express card to get collect points. Bhatja says the company hopes the program will make new customers aware of their cards.  

The program may also help American Express target a different kind of customer.

“The appeal for American Express has always been targeting that higher-end, more upscale card holder than the other card issuers have focused on,” says Matt Schulz, a senior industry analyst at CreditCards.com.

By partnering with companies with wide-ranging customers, like Rite Aid, AT&T, Macy’s, Schulz says American Express could broaden its base with a less-affluent customer and that the company could also be hoping for some good headlines after losing an exclusive contract with contract with Costco recently.

Netanyahu plans coalition 'in weeks'

BBC - Wed, 2015-03-18 08:01
Israel's surprise election victor Benjamin Netanyahu will form a coalition 'in two to three weeks', his party says

PODCAST: Facebook gets into mobile payment

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-03-18 07:53

We're watching closely today for any clue to when the Federal Reserve could be raising interest rates, and most of the speculation hinges on just one word: "patient." What does it mean and how did we get here? J.P. Morgan's David Kelly is here to shed some light on the situation. Then, Facebook is adding the option to send other users money via its Messenger app. Tracey Samuelson tells us how the move could bring mobile payment into the mainstream and open up new revenue opportunities for the site. Finally, it's taken as a given that that veterans from the post-9/11 era have had an especially hard time finding work. Anecdotal evidence is plentiful, but hard numbers are surprisingly elusive. Dan Weissmann investigates.

Debate: Should The U.S. Adopt The 'Right To Be Forgotten' Online?

NPR News - Wed, 2015-03-18 07:53

People don't always like what they see when they Google themselves. EU residents have a right to request that unflattering material be removed from online search results. Should the U.S. follow suit?

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