National / International News

British teenager killed in Syria

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:41
A British teenager said to have "died in battle" fighting with anti-government forces in Syria, is described as a "martyr" by his father.

Keystone XL Pipeline Review Extended By State Department

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:40

Federal agencies are getting more time to review the controversial project, the State Department says, given an ongoing legal battle in Nebraska over whether the pipeline could pass through.

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Captains Uncourageous: Abandoning Ship Long Seen As A Crime

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:26

Whenever a captain comes back and passengers don't, it's seen as shameful behavior. The captains of the Costa Concordia and the South Korean ferry both received blame for not staying with their ship.

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The importance of confidence for women

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:25

Women in the workforce get no shortage of messages about how we should behave. Advocate for yourself … but not too much. Ask for a raise … but pick your moment.

Katty Kay, the anchor of BBC World News America, and Claire Shipman, correspondent for ABC and Good Morning America, authors of "The Confidence Code," argue that women will occupy more C-suites and positions of power by taking risks, speaking up, and being more confident.

How confident are you? Take the ‘Confidence Quiz’

On the meaning of confidence:

Shipman: “The stuff that turns thoughts into action … Confidence is about your belief in your ability to have an impact on the world. To get things done , so there’s a real element of action about it."

On the confidence gap between men and women:

Kay: "The last book we wrote made the case for women in business and how companies, organizations, that employ more senior women, do better than their competitors. And yet as we interviewed these senior women we kept hearing phrases like, ‘You know, I’m just lucky to have got where I am,’ or, ‘I was in the right place at the right time,’ or, ‘I’m not sure I’m the right person for that new promotion or that new big contract.’ And we thought that’s so strange, you know, we never hear phrases like that from men. So, we started to dig into the research on this and a lot of psychologists and business schools have now done research showing that there is indeed a confidence gap between men and women."

"For example, there is a business school study from Manchester University in the U.K., that the professor has been asking students, what do you think you deserve to earn five years after you graduate. Men routinely say they deserve to earn $80,000 on average. Women will say it’s $64,000. That a 20% difference. [At] Hewlett Packard, women will apply for promotions when they have 100% of the skill set, men are happy if they have 60% of the skill set because they think they’re going to learn the rest on the job."

"Women, whilst we have all the talent, we have all the competence, we’re perfectly able, we are undervaluing ourselves compared to men."

On the importance of failure:

Shipman: "Carol Dweck said to us something that was pivotal. She said, “If life were one long grade school, women would rule the world.” And that is because although we’re raising girls in large measure these days to think they can do anything, we’re still nurturing them to be perfect and people pleasers and well behaved — in fact, too perfect. And so they internalize this sort of coloring within the lines, pleasing people, being quiet, getting good grades. They do that all the way through college. They excel. They hit the real world, and guess what? They haven’t screwed up. They haven’t failed. They haven’t learned that you lose, you flunk, you do this. It doesn’t matter you just keep going."

Kay: "What you learn when you fail at something, whether it’s something small like asking for a pay raise that you don’t get, big or small, whether it’s in your personal life or private life, in the end you realize you’re still there. You’re still standing."

The importance of confidence

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:25

Women in the workforce get no shortage of messages about how we should behave. Advocate for yourself … but not too much. Ask for a raise … but pick your moment.

Katty Kay, the anchor of BBC World News America, and Claire Shipman, correspondent for ABC and Good Morning America, authors of "The Confidence Code," argue that women will occupy more C-suites and positions of power by taking risks, speaking up, and being more confident.

How confident are you? Take the ‘Confidence Quiz’

On the meaning of confidence:

Shipman: “The stuff that turns thoughts into action … Confidence is about your belief in your ability to have an impact on the world. To get things done , so there’s a real element of action about it.

On the confidence gap between men and women:

Kay: The last book we wrote made the case for women in business and how companies, organizations, that employ more senior women, do better than their competitors. And yet as we interviewed these senior women we kept hearing phrases like, ‘You know, I’m just lucky to have got where I am,’ or, ‘I was in the right place at the right time,’ or, ‘I’m not sure I’m the right person for that new promotion or that new big contract.’ And we thought that’s so strange, you know, we never hear phrases like that from men. So, we started to dig into the research on this and a lot of psychologists and business schools have now done research showing that there is indeed a confidence gap between men and women.

For example, there is a business school study from Manchester University in the U.K., that the professor has been asking students, what do you think you deserve to earn five years after you graduate. Men routinely say they deserve to earn $80,000 on average. Women will say it’s $64,000. That a 20% difference. [At] Hewlett Packard, women will apply for promotions when they have 100% of the skill set, men are happy if they have 60% of the skill set because they think they’re going to learn the rest on the job.

Women, whilst we have all the talent, we have all the competence, we’re perfectly able, we are undervaluing ourselves compared to men.

On the importance of failure:

Shipman: Carol Dweck said to us something that was pivotal. She said, “If life were one long grade school, women would rule the world.” And that is because although we’re raising girls in large measure these days to think they can do anything, we’re still nurturing them to be perfect and people pleasers and well behaved — in fact, too perfect. And so they internalize this sort of coloring within the lines, pleasing people, being quiet, getting good grades. They do that all the way through college. They excel. They hit the real world, and guess what? They haven’t screwed up. They haven’t failed. They haven’t learned that you lose, you flunk, you do this. It doesn’t matter you just keep going.

Kay: What you learn when you fail at something, whether it’s something small like asking for a pay raise that you don’t get, big or small, whether it’s in your personal life or private life, in the end you realize you’re still there. You’re still standing.

Russia's annexation of Crimea comes with a cost

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:13

The Russians are now suffering a double financial whammy from the crisis in Ukraine. Not only have they seen a big slowdown in their economic growth thanks to sanctions -- they’re also counting the specific cost of annexing the Ukrainian province of Crimea.

The annexation the Black Sea peninsula has proved wildly popular in Russia. But after the first flush of acquisition, reality is beginning to dawn and, like many takeovers in the corporate world, this one is turning out to be very costly.

“In many ways Russia may have bitten off more than it expected with Crimea. And I think the overhaul of the economy there is a bigger task than many would expect,” argues Raoul Ruparel of the Open Europe think tank.

The peninsula may be semi-detached physically from the rest of Ukraine, but it is well-integrated economically with the mainland. Prying it away from Ukraine and plugging it into Russia won’t be easy… or cheap.

“It is really dependent on mainland Ukraine for its power supply, and for its food supply, and for its public services. The banking system will be really difficult to disentangle,” claims Lilit Grevorgyan of IHS Global Insight. 

Building new infrastructure and new financial links between Crimea and Russia will cost a fortune. $3 billion for new power stations. $3 billion for a planned bridge between the two countries. And then there’s the pledge to raise pensions and public sector wages in Crimea to Russian levels, which will set the  Kremlin back a further $3 billion a year.

“In the context of an already difficult fiscal environment, those pledges pose a problem,” explains Sam Charap of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. “It’s not surprising that the Russian finance minister is complaining about the extra cost.”

There is an economic upside to the annexation. Russia will save an estimated $4 billion a year in rent for its naval base in Crimea. And there is the prospect of exploiting untapped oil and gas reserves off the Crimean coast. Not that annexing Crimea was motivated by money. It’s about national pride . The move has won the overwhelming approval of the Russian public – 79 percent are in favor. 

However - say the critics – that is no guarantee that Russia’s actions will prove successful in the long term. Most Germans applauded Hitler’s annexation of Sudetenland - the German speaking province of Checkoslovakia. And – as we know – that didn’t end well for Germany.

Salsa Legend Cheo Feliciano Dies

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:12

One of the most respected figures in Latin music, the salsa singer had deep roots in both Puerto Rico and New York, where he influenced a younger generation of musicians.

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VIDEO: World's prettiest Easter eggs?

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:09
A Slavic community museum in Germany is keeping alive the traditional craft of Easter egg painting.

Military commissaries consider going generic

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 10:26
Monday, April 21, 2014 - 05:20 Wikimedia Commons

The commissary at the Fort Hood base.

Military commissaries, grocery stores that sell name-brand products to military families basically at cost, are facing a billion-dollar budget cut over the next three years. And defense officials are considering a sea change for commissaries: allowing them to stock generic.

That’s something Patt Donaldson would like, and steering two kids and two loaded carts, he and his wife Jessica Donaldson wrap up a big shopping trip.

She’s in the Navy and they live near the Fort Belvoir Commissary in Virginia. But they do these big runs off base – at ALDI, Costco, and Wegmans. They like the produce better, and all the store brands. Generic yogurt, canned fruit and pasta run down the belt to checkout.

“The generics we can get outside of the commissary is certainly far cheaper for us than what we can get buying name brands in the commissary,” says Patt Donaldson.

This is something military spouses often debate – where to get the best deals. Commissaries offer 30 percent savings on a typical basket of brand name goods, though some products see steeper discounts than others.

Currently, commissaries can’t sell generics. But now that the Pentagon has proposed a billion dollar commissary cut over three years, commissary prices are expected to rise. That has some officials wondering if stocking generics is a solution.

It’s an option Sgt. Maj. Of the Army Raymond Chandler described at a recent Senate Armed Services Committee hearing.

“If I’m a young soldier and I choose to go to the commissary... the only thing I can buy is Green Giant or Hunt’s brands," he said. "But I can go to Walmart and get great value and that’s 30 cents less for a can of corn than it is in the commissary.”

So stock generics and everyone saves, right? Upsetting the commissary ecology has risks, says Tom Gordy, President of the Armed Forces Marketing Council, which represents military brokers who work with the name brands.

Say for example the Defense Commissary Agency went out and contracted for a store brand. Let’s call it Five Star Food. “That means the name brand products that are on the shelves will lose their shelf space, and they will also lose volume of sales,” he says.

Five Star Food would have costs, of course. To make it look as cheap as a generics in civilian groceries, Gordy says commissaries might have to mark up their remaining name brands even more.

“The manufacturers right now, most of them give best pricing to the Defense Commissary Agency,” he says.

They also provide marketing dollars. They even stock shelves. All, Gordy says, to support a military benefit. They might be less inclined to subsidize a military business.

Marketplace Morning Report for Monday, April 21, 2014 Kate Davidson/Marketplace

Military spouse Patt Donaldson after a recent shopping trip.

by Kate DavidsonPodcast Title Military commissaries consider going genericStory Type FeatureSyndication Flipboard BusinessSlackerSoundcloudStitcherBusiness InsiderSwellPMPApp Respond No

VIDEO: Kate meets Manly Beach life-savers

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 10:11
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have made an appearance at Sydney's Royal Easter Show, during their tour of Australia.

Japan Says It Will Temporarily Scale Back Whale Hunt

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 10:02

After a U.N. court ruling last month ordering Japan to halt whaling in Antarctic waters, Tokyo said it was reducing its target catch to just 210 animals a year.

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Solar grows, with government help

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:56
Friday, April 18, 2014 - 16:55 Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy unveiled 891 photovoltaic modules on the roof of the the department's Forrestal building roof in Washington, DC. 

The White House announced new initiatives to support more solar development this week. But the Department of Energy’s inspector general cast a cloud, with a report slamming a $68 million loan guarantee gone wrong—shades of the Solyndra failure.  

However, solar has actually been growing by leaps and bounds. It provides a little less than 1 percent of U.S. electricity— enough to light more than two million households. Other numbers sound even more impressive.

"More solar has been installed in 18 months than in the previous 30 years combined," says Ken Johnson, vice president of communications for the Solar Energy Industries Association.  "The cost of installed solar systems have dropped 50 percent since 2010."

"Over the last five years, costs have come way down, particularly for large-scale solar installations," says Severin Borenstein of the University of California's Haas School of Business.  "They are almost competitive in some areas now with regular fossil fuel power."

Home installations, he says, are more qualified.

"Some people can save money by putting in solar on their house," he says. "Most people still won't save money."

Solar is competitive only because of government subsidies— many in the form of tax breaks. Borenstein says the calculations are complicated, but federal tax breaks alone can give back almost 45 percent.

That investment is paying off, says Shayle Kann, senior vice president of research at Greentech Media. "It's created a market that has driven costs down year over year," he says. "And why the drop in price accelerates is because there's learning that is done from all these installations. There are economies of scale. 

"There's been a huge storyline about panel prices falling," he says. "Actually, in 2013, the price of panels rose a little bit, and despite that, system prices fell. And that’s where learning from increased deployments makes a huge difference."  

Marketplace for Friday April 18, 2014by Dan WeissmannPodcast Title Solar grows, with government helpStory Type News StorySyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

Hunting For The Tastiest Egg: Duck, Goose, Chicken Or Quail?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:55

We hard-boiled them. We donned blindfolds. And we chowed down. In our eggsperiment, can you guess which bird prevailed in the ultimate showdown of duck vs. chicken?

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Marketing to men with razors

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:54
Friday, April 18, 2014 - 16:52 Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images

Brad Griffith of Woodhaven, Queens, New York shaves with the Gillette M3Power Micro-Powered Razor at Gotham Hall back in 2004 in New York City.

When it comes to marketing products to men, it helps to play up how technologically advanced they are, says Jean-Pierre Dubé, a marketing professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

"Men love inscrutable jargon," he says.

And Gillette seems ready to take a page out of Dube’s playbook, with the ProGlide FlexBall, which features “a swiveling ball-hinge that allows the blade to pivot and comes with a high-end price,” The Wall Street Journal reports. The razor, which is expected to debut around Father’s Day, “cuts hairs 23 microns shorter.”

It’s just the latest innovation in high-end men’s shaving:

By Shea Huffman

The shaving arms race really kicked off with Gillette's MACH3 razor, marketed for its three blades that promised a closer shave.

Courtesy of Gillette.

Not to be outdone, competitor Schick decided to one-up Gillette with its quaduple-bladed razor, the Quattro.

Courtesy of Quattro.

It was at this point that people started to question the wisdom of simply adding more and more blades to razors. At least one noteable outlet asked, "What's next, five blades?"

As it turns out, that's precisely what was next. Gillette's Fusion ProGlide boasted a quintuple-bladed head.

Courtesy of Gillette.

Schick quickly came out with its own five-blade razor in response, the Hydro 5.

Courtesy of Schick.

With five blades in the razor already, what more could you do to impress the discerning man looking for a close shave? Of course! You attach a tiny battery-operated motor to the blades to make them vibrate. Thus the Gillette Fusion ProGlide Power Razer was born.

Courtesy of Gillette

With the disposable razor companies now venturing into the motorized trimmer business, it was only a matter of time before they just stuck an entire electric razor into mix. For your consideration, the Gillette Fusion ProGlide Styler 3-in-1 Men's Body Groomer with Beard Trimmer.

Courtesy of Gillette.

With a rotating-on-a-ball-hinge blade forthcoming from Gillette, what more could a man possibly want out of his shaving tools?

Razor companies will surely let them know.

And ladies, don't think you're immune to the razor marketing madness:

Courtesy of Gillette.

Marketplace for Friday April 18, 2014by David GuraPodcast Title Marketing to men with razorsStory Type News StorySyndication Flipboard BusinessSlackerSoundcloudStitcherBusiness InsiderSwellPMPApp Respond No

VIDEO: Film Review - the week's new releases

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:54
Film critic Anna Smith reviews the week's new film releases, including comedy The Love Punch, character driven drama, Locke, and We Are The Best!, a witty drama about a punk band in the 1980s.

Man killed in microlight crash

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:53
A man has died in a microlight crash in Devon, police say.

'Martinez-charmed Everton will not welcome Moyes'

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:53
Man Utd boss David Moyes will not get a warm welcome back at Everton, whose fans have fallen under Roberto Martinez's spell, writes Phil McNulty

It's cheaper to buy than rent, but the gap is closing

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:51
Friday, April 18, 2014 - 16:49 Scott Olson/Getty Images

A 'For Sale' sign stands in front of a house on May 31, 2011 in Chicago, Ill. Some homes in Gary, Indiana are selling for $1.00.

If you live in parts of California, or New York, or Hawaii. You’re not going to believe what I’m about to tell you.

But, it is true.

In most parts of the country, it can be a whole lot cheaper to pay a mortgage than to pay rent.

“Home values are still down about 13 percent from where they were at peak values in 2007,” said Stan Humphries, Chief Economist at Zillow, “pair that with historically low mortgage rates, and you have a real situation of affordability in the U.S.”

The situation for renters, on the other hand, is pretty awful.  Rents are way up. “We’re at the worse place we’ve ever been in terms of rental affordability,” said Chris Herbert, Research Director at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

Demand for rentals has jumped since the recession. Herbert says today half of renters spend more than 30 percent of their income on accommodation.

Which might have you wondering—if it’s REALLY cheaper ... why don’t people just buy?

“For one thing, if you don’t have savings, you’re going to have a hard time making down payment constraints,” said Herbert, “and if you’re spending a lot of your income now for rent, it's going to be very hard to get that savings together.”

Also, since the housing crisis, it’s a whole lot harder to get a loan.

Right now, the difference between buying and renting is narrowing ever so slightly.

“Over the past year, rents have risen nationally almost four percent year-over-year” said Jed Kolko, Chief Economist at Trulia, “but home prices have risen faster, home prices are up about ten percent nationally year-over-year.

The price gap between buyers and renters is shrinking. But housing is getting less affordable for everyone.

Marketplace for Friday April 18, 2014by Adriene HillPodcast Title It's cheaper to buy than rent, but the gap is closingStory Type News StorySyndication Flipboard BusinessSlackerSoundcloudStitcherBusiness InsiderSwellPMPApp Respond No

It pays to be polite in-flight

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:39

As evidenced in the video below, which has been viewed nearly 9.5 million times (and counting) on YouTube, Marty Cobb is one likeable flight attendant.

But even if the members of your cabin crew aren't hilarious, it’s important to make them like you, according to George Hobica, founder of AirfareWatchdog.com.

Hobica, who was flying before he learned how to walk, believes that packing our manners on every flight is the right thing to do — and it has paid off for him in various ways, including class upgrades and complimentary cocktails.

9. Pens! People are always asking flight attendants for pens, whether to complete immigration and customs forms or to simply do the crossword puzzle. Bring a few extra cheap pens, bundle them up and give them to your crewmember. It may not be as enjoyable as a box of chocolates, but they will surely put them to good use.

Click the audio player to hear Hobica’s plea for in-flight politeness and read more tips for making flight attendants like you

Have travel tips of your own? Share them with a comment below or Tweet them to us @LiveMoney

And if you're curious about the airplane movie references in the interview, they're from "Airplane," "Midnight Run," "View From The Top," and "Soul Plane."

Kiev reaches out to eastern rebels

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:38
Ukraine's interim authorities appeal for unity, promising to meet some demands of pro-Russian protesters occupying buildings in the east.
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