National / International News

Inside Sierra Leone's Ebola clinics

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 07:58
How patients' relatives search in vain for treatment

The 21st Century house cat

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 07:53
Can four felines live happily under the same roof?

Supreme Court Declines To Take Up Gay-Marriage Appeals

NPR News - Mon, 2014-10-06 07:37

On Monday, on the first day of its new term, the court stunned the legal world, refusing to take any of the appeals pending on lower court rulings allowing gay marriage.

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Attack code for USB flaw released

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 07:29
Computer code that can turn almost any device that connects via USB into a cyber-attack platform has been shared online.

Bianchi 'critical but stable' - FIA

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 06:53
Jules Bianchi's condition is described as "critical but stable" by the FIA following his crash in the Japanese Grand Prix.

Somali forces control key port

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 06:39
Somali government and African Union forces have taken full control of the last port city held by militant Islamists, officials say.

Analysis: Why are Western women joining IS?

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 06:08
Why are Western women joining Islamic State?

The FCC takes on illegal jamming

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-10-06 06:00

Last week, the FCC fined Marriott $600,000 for jamming guests’ Wi-Fi signals at one of its hotels. The Marriott Gaylord Opryland in Nashville, Tennessee, was operating software designed to protect networks from threats, but instead used it to disrupt and shut down the Wi-Fi hot spot that guests had set up in one of its conference rooms. Marriott charges up to $1,000 for setting up Wi-Fi hot spots of its own, but doesn’t bar people from using other Wi-Fi systems.

Marriott, for its part, says the hotel acted lawfully and that the FCC is vague about what kinds of jamming are allowed. The FCC seems to have been pretty clear for several years now that pretty much no jamming is permissible. Also, if you think you’re being jammed, they have an online tip line

Here are some of the creative ways people have been using signal jammers to mess with GPS, cellphones and Wi-Fi (and how they got busted for it).

1. If I can't talk to anyone on the bus, nobody will!

This guy used a jammer to keep people from chatting on the bus.  

2. Putting the "mute" in commute

A Florida man didn’t want people talking or texting while driving. So he put a jammer in his car to disrupt the phones of everyone who drove around him as he commuted to work each day. Unfortunately, he was also interfering with 911 signals. And people who were lawfully using a headset.  

3. Welcome to the People's Republic of Workistan

Employers seem to love jamming their employees' phones. Steel manufacturing companies do it. So do sewing companies.

4. You're not the boss of me

Employees have used jammers to fight back. This guy’s boss put GPS trackers in his truck to track his whereabouts and lunch breaks, so he got a jammer to disable it. Unfortunately, he also messed with planes landing and taking off at the airport.  

5. Jam tomorrow. Jam yesterday. But never jam today.

In the largest fine of the agency’s history, the FCC said it would assess a $34.9 million penalty against a Chinese signal jammer manufacturer for marketing its products in the U.S. over two years. It’s gone after smaller manufacturers as well, after jammers were found being used in a Texas cosmetology school and another disrupted communications in a sheriff’s office in Florida. As Mitchell Lazarus writes for CommLawBlog:

“Ironically, in both Texas and Florida, it is legal to openly carry firearms into a Starbucks, say. But not a phone jammer. So when the cell phone at the next table erupts into The William Tell Overture and its owner bellows, “HELLO? HEY! YEAH, IN A STARBUCKS! IT’S RAINING HERE! SO WHERE’RE YOU?” pulling out the jammer is not an option. It’s the firearm or nothing. This may not be good public policy.”

Why women suffer more knee injuries

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 05:58
Alistair Magowan asks if the number of knee injuries are down to wider hips, synthetic pitches and too many games.

'Local schools' drive inequality

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 05:57
Deciding school admissions on distance from home means giving an unfair advantage to wealthy families, say researchers

Haiti wreck 'not Columbus's ship'

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 05:40
Experts examining a shipwreck off Haiti have ruled out the possibility that it is Christopher Columbus's flagship, the Santa Maria, which sank in 1492.

In pictures: In the crowd

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 04:53
Street photographs by Kate Hooper

VIDEO: Convicted killer admits making bomb

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 04:44
A man, who killed five people in 1978, has admitted possessing firearms and making an improvised explosive device.

VIDEO: UK jihadists prisoner swap 'credible'

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 04:41
Reports that UK jihadists were involved in a prisoner swap between Islamic State (IS) and Turkey are 'credible', Whitehall officials have told the BBC.

Day in pictures: 6 October

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 04:38
24 hours of news images: 6 October

VIDEO: 'Nerve-shredding' - Alien: Isolation

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 04:24
Marc Cieslak reviews the new video game Alien: Isolation to be released on 7 October.

Nobel Prize for brain's GPS discovery

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 03:55
The Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine has been awarded to three scientists who discovered the brain's "GPS system".

Another day, another corporate breakup

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-10-06 03:40

Another day, another corporate breakup. Hewlett-Packard confirmed today it will split into two companies. One will focus on personal computers and printers, and the other will focus, among other things, on the enterprise space of the cloud. It turns out HP is not the only old tech company that's been refocusing in a divergent tech landscape.

'Fatal fire' at Iran military centre

BBC - Mon, 2014-10-06 03:37
Two people have been killed in a fire and explosion at a military facility near the Iranian capital Tehran, reports say.

PODCAST: William Dudley on regulation and interest rates

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-10-06 03:00

It's the job of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to regulate powerful Wall Street banks. It's not the only regulator, of course, yet it's a crucial one. But has the New York Fed become too deferential to the financial institutions it watches over, too cozy? This question moved to the foreground after the public radio program This American Life with news organization ProPublica obtained audio recordings made secretly inside the New York Fed. The recordings were made by a then–New York Fed employee who would later sue for wrongful dismissal. William Dudley, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, joins us to discuss. He'll also talk about one of the most consequential economic decisions of the decade: when, at long last, to raise interest rates. That determination, which will have the effect of tapping the brakes of the economy, will revolve around how strong the labor market has become and whether prices are threatening to rise too quickly.

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