National / International News

Baltimore businesses big and small regroup after riots

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-04-29 02:01

Kim Peace was crushed when her neighborhood CVS pharmacy was destroyed by looters.

"I'm really upset because I have to have medication," Peace says, "And I can't even get my medication today because they burned CVS up."

Peace has asthma, but that didn't stop her from sweeping up an alley in West Baltimore with her seven-year-old granddaughter.

"I'm not going to let the dirt and dust get in my way of trying to keep the community clean."

She says she and her neighbors rely on that store for food, milk, and diapers. And it wasn't just large chain stores that were damaged. Nearby, Sheranda Palmer was still in shock after the beauty parlor she co-owns was ransacked.

"We worked hard for this," Palmer says. "We didn't get grants for this. This was our hard earned money."

Palmer has insurance and hopes to reopen by the weekend. But even then, she wonders how soon her customers will feel safe coming back.

Audio for this story is forthcoming.

 

 

Comparing colleges by economic value of their degrees

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-04-29 02:00

Question: What do Cal Tech, Concord’s Community College in New Hampshire, MIT, Carleton College in Minnesota, Lee College in Texas, and Pueblo Community College in Colorado, all have in common?

Answer: They are ranked in the top twenty schools in the country for “adding value” to a student’s college years.

According to a new analysis  by the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program, these and other top-ranked colleges and universities give students an economic boost in terms of long-term career success and earning power, compared to similar two- and four-year institutions.

Brookings researchers crunched the numbers on thousands of schools that provide associate’s and bachelor’s degrees, comparing graduates’ mid-career salaries and rates of  student-loan repayment, as well as schools' financial aid and career-services offerings.

“With tuition continuing to rise ever-higher," says Brookings lead author Jonathan Rothwell, "public policymakers and students are interested in answering the question: What is the college going to do for me? What contribution is the college going to make to my future career?”

A new college ranking looks at which schools contribute most to students' long-term economic success.

Brookings

One clear takeaway from the voluminous economic-impact data compiled by Brookings is that any academic study in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and math—is likely to deliver a good return on educational investment. Salaries, benefits, and job opportunities are significantly better in these fields than in professions favored by liberal arts graduates, such as teaching, publishing, social services and government.

Rob Franek, publisher of The Princeton Review, welcomes the new data and rankings from Brookings. He says they offer a much-needed financial lens to help students and families decide where to go, how much to spend, and how much to borrow, for higher education.

The Princeton Review’s popular college guide and online resources highlight many of the nation’s most prestigious, brand-name universities. But Franek says those aren’t the only places worth spending one’s tuition dollars.

“You can’t say, just because of brand perception, that your tuition dollars are going to pay off. A community college might turn out to be the best value for a student paired with a bachelor’s degree in a couple of years," says Franek.

The federal government, meanwhile, is preparing its own higher-education value assessments to help consumers compare colleges’ relative costs and benefits. Some university administrators worry that the new rankings will result in their schools being stigmatized as a ‘worse buy’ for the typical student’s higher-education dollar, and that their access to federal financial-aid funding will be reduced.

Comparing colleges by economic value of their degrees

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-04-29 02:00

Question: What do Cal Tech, Concord’s Community College in New Hampshire, MIT, Carleton College in Minnesota, Lee College in Texas, and Pueblo Community College in Colorado, all have in common?

Answer: They are ranked in the top twenty schools in the country for “adding value” to a student’s college years.

According to a new analysis  by the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program, these and other top-ranked colleges and universities give students an economic boost in terms of long-term career success and earning power, compared to similar two- and four-year institutions.

Brookings researchers crunched the numbers on thousands of schools that provide associate’s and bachelor’s degrees, comparing graduates’ mid-career salaries and rates of  student-loan repayment, as well as schools' financial aid and career-services offerings.

“With tuition continuing to rise ever-higher," says Brookings lead author Jonathan Rothwell, "public policymakers and students are interested in answering the question: What is the college going to do for me? What contribution is the college going to make to my future career?”

One clear takeaway from the voluminous economic-impact data compiled by Brookings is that any academic study in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and math—is likely to deliver a good return on educational investment. Salaries, benefits, and job opportunities are significantly better in these fields than in professions favored by liberal arts graduates, such as teaching, publishing, social services and government.

Rob Franek, publisher of The Princeton Review, welcomes the new data and rankings from Brookings. He says they offer a much-needed financial lens to help students and families decide where to go, how much to spend, and how much to borrow, for higher education.

The Princeton Review’s popular college guide and online resources highlight many of the nation’s most prestigious, brand-name universities. But Franek says those aren’t the only places worth spending one’s tuition dollars.

“You can’t say, just because of brand perception, that your tuition dollars are going to pay off. A community college might turn out to be the best value for a student paired with a bachelor’s degree in a couple of years," says Franek.

The federal government, meanwhile, is preparing its own higher-education value assessments to help consumers compare colleges’ relative costs and benefits. Some university administrators worry that the new rankings will result in their schools being stigmatized as a ‘worse buy’ for the typical student’s higher-education dollar, and that their access to federal financial-aid funding will be reduced.

Uber wants to be the Uber of merchant delivery

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:52
27 percent

That's the percentage of Fortune 500 companies that publish a pay-for-performance report, as found by a proxy analysis by Towers Watson. Those reports disclose what the top earners at a company are paid vs. the companies financial results. But that percentage may soon grow, as the SEC announced on Wednesday that it would propose new rules forcing more companies to participate in such reports, making their numbers more transparent to shareholders.

2 out of 5

That's how many postsecondary graduates come out of colleges granting credentials of two years or less. And yet most college rankings do not include these schools. A new analysis by Brookings not only takes a look at both two- and four- year institutions, but also analyzes the added value they provide to their graduates. More specifically, the report looks at how alumni performed economically in the long-term vs. their projected performance based on their characteristics and type of institution they attended.

$8,000

That's what business owner Sheranda Palmer says she spent on renovating her West Baltimore salon before it was ransacked by looters Monday. Palmer isn't the only one. Marketplace reporter Amy Scott walked around one of many blocks affected by rioting in the wake of Freddie Gray's death and talked to residents who are taking stock, cleaning up and trying to rebuild.

400 merchants

Apparently, Uber is trying to be the Uber of merchant delivery. According to some sources, as many as 400 merchants are in discussion with the sharing-economy juggernaut to launch a same-day delivery service. As reported by TechCrunch, businesses like Neiman Marcus, Louis Vuitton, Tiffany’s, Cohen’s Fashion Optical and Hugo Boss are already in talks with the new venture, called UberRUSH.

$44 million

That's what NFL Commissioner Rodger Goodell made in 2013, and we know because the NFL is a 501(c)6 non-profit. The league announced Tuesday that it will give up its tax-exempt status and join its 32 teams as taxable entities. It's a good PR move for an embattled organization, and it'll bring in $100 million in taxes over the next decade, but the change also means the NFL isn't required to disclose executive salaries and other business information anymore.

Protest-hit Burundi blocks social media

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:52
Messaging services including Facebook, Whatsapp and Twitter are cut off in Burundi amid protests over the president seeking a third term.

French boss forced out over taxi bill

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:52
Agnes Saal resigns as head of France's National Audiovisual Institute after spending some €40,000 in taxi journeys in 10 months.

Gazprom profits hit by weak rouble

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:47
Russia's largest energy company, Gazprom, reports a plunge in annual profits after being hit by the fall in the value of the rouble and lower energy prices.

E. coli restaurant fined £110,000

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:32
At least 140 people contracted E. coli in an outbreak at Flicks restaurant three years ago

Trump beats Ding to reach semi-final

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:30
Judd Trump completes a crushing 13-4 win over Chinese third seed Ding Junhui to reach the semi-finals of the World Championship.

Timber lorry crashes into house

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:26
A lorry carrying timber crashes into the side of a house on the A831 in the Highlands.

Farage: EU could let in extremists

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:23
Nigel Farage claims that EU plans to deal with the migrant boat crisis could allow in Islamist extremists.

Lil' Chris's death caused by hanging

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:20
Singer Lil' Chris's death was caused by hanging, an inquest hears.

VIDEO: Is Britain's housing market working?

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:20
New research by the charity Shelter suggests that eight out of ten houses on the market are not affordable for working families.

National park appeals for Nepal aid

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:14
A national park with strong links to the British Army's Nepalese Ghurkha soldiers makes an appeal to gather aid to take out to the earthquake-hit country.

NZ church ejects tai chi group

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:07
NZ church gives tai chi group the boot

Ministers ordered to cut pollution

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:04
The Supreme Court has ruled that the UK government must draw up plans to reduce air pollution by the end of this year.

Baltimore Is Not Ferguson. Here's What It Really Is

NPR News - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:03

Baltimore is a usually friendly city, where strangers are often addressed as "hon." It's also where stores were looted and cars burned following Monday's funeral for Freddie Gray.

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GOP Measure Would Make It Harder For Obama To Empty Guantanamo

NPR News - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:03

One of President Obama's first promises in office was to shut down the Guantanamo Bay prison camp in Cuba. Congress, however, is trying to shut down the effort to empty the camp of all its inmates.

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After Botched Executions, Supreme Court Weighs Lethal Drug Cocktail

NPR News - Wed, 2015-04-29 01:00

Manufacturers have refused to provide one of three drugs used for lethal injection, so Oklahoma switched to another drug. But critics say midazolam doesn't work well to render prisoners unconscious.

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Youths attack Greece's Varoufakis

BBC - Wed, 2015-04-29 00:54
Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis describes how he and his wife were abused by a group of youths at a restaurant in Athens late on Tuesday.

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