National / International News

After Two Disasters, Can Malaysia Airlines Still Attract Passengers?

NPR News - Wed, 2014-07-23 09:12

Even before the double calamity of its two downed flights, Malaysia Airlines was trying to adapt to momentous shifts in Asia's aviation industry. Now, it faces either bankruptcy or privatization.

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VIDEO: Is this the most ridiculous kit ever?

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:59
Spanish second tier side Cultural Leonesa have revealed their new kit for the forthcoming season - a black and white shirt designed to look like a tuxedo.

Bulgarian prime minister resigns

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:58
The embattled Socialist prime minister of Bulgaria resigns after only a year in office to allow for an early election on 5 October.

Obituary: Dora Bryan

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:58
Remembering the talented character actress

VIDEO: Dozens killed in Taiwan plane crash

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:57
More than 40 people were killed when a TransAsia Airways passenger plane crashed after making a failed emergency landing in Taiwan, local officials say.

Dozens killed in Taiwan plane crash

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:56
More than 40 people die when a TransAsia Airways passenger plane crashes after making a failed emergency landing in Taiwan, local officials say.

Somali musician-MP is shot dead

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:54
Popular Somali musician and member of parliament Saado Ali Warsame is shot dead by Islamist militants in the capital, Mogadishu.

Tor creator works to debug dark web

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:47
One of the co-creators of Tor says he is working with others to tackle a "bug" that undermines the anonymity offered by the dark web system.

Majka wins stage as Nibali extends lead

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:42
Poland's Rafal Majka clinches his second Tour de France stage win as Vincenzo Nibali moves further ahead on stage 17.

FAA Extends Ban On Flights To Tel Aviv For Another 24 Hours

NPR News - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:40

The Federal Aviation Administration banned flights to the region on Tuesday after a rocket landed about a mile from Ben Gurion International Airport.

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Abuse of human growth hormone on the rise in teens

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:36

Use of human growth hormone is on the rise among teens in the U.S., according to a new report from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Human growth hormone (HGH) occurs naturally in the body and stimulates growth. But in recent years, a synthetic version of HGH been abused by professional athletes to enhance their performance, much like steroids.

While abuse of other drugs is flat or falling, the number of teens who say they’ve used HGH has doubled since 2012, to 11 percent, according to the survey.

But it’s not just teen athletes looking for an edge.

"A lot of kids are very interested in body image,” says Steve Pasierb, president and CEO of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. “Young girls want to be lean and toned, young boys want to be muscular and impressive.”

That desire has been met with aggressive marketing efforts for over-the-counter supplements that claim to boost HGH levels in the body.

Because the study is based on teens who self-report using HGH, it’s unclear whether the respondents were using these supplements or injecting the pharmaceutical-grade drug.

Shaun Assael, a senior writer at ESPN and the author of "Steroid Nation," believes the high cost of the pharmaceutical version would limit its use.

“The idea that [HGH] is being passed around in gym locker rooms, I’m not going to say it never goes on, but I’m highly skeptical of that,” he said.

Either way, the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids finds the data troubling and potentially dangerous for teens, since supplement manufacturers don’t need approval from the Food and Drug Administration before marketing a new product. Rather, it’s the company’s responsibility to make sure the supplements are safe and effective.

However, even if the supplements aren’t dangerous, they are a waste of money, says Chris Cooper, a professor of biochemistry at the University of Essex and the author of the book "Run, Swim, Throw, Cheat."

“In general, a lot of pills that claim to effect human growth hormone in the body do nothing of the sort,” Cooper says. “Probably they just have a bad effect on your bank balance rather than your health.”

But Cooper cautions that injecting the wrong dose of synthetic HGH or using it without the supervision of a doctor can have much more serious health implications on teens’ growing bodies, including increased risk of diabetes.

Legalizing Prostitution Would Protect Sex Workers From HIV

NPR News - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:36

When the police clamp down on female sex workers, the women may end up taking more risks — and making themselves more vulnerable to HIV.

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PM to check arms export licences

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:27
David Cameron vows to examine outstanding licences for the sale of arms to Russia after claims by MPs that they could breach the terms of an embargo.

Part-Time Work, Unpredictable Schedules: What's The Fix?

NPR News - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:24

Many part-time workers have to manage unpredictable hours and schedules, which can take a toll on employees. Host Michel Martin learns about how some government officials are addressing the concern.

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When time stood still

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:24
The Japanese man who lost everything but found peace

Indian boy has 232 teeth removed

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:23
Doctors in India extract 232 teeth from the mouth of a 17-year-old boy in a seven-hour operation.

Europe's troubles exposed by MH17 crash

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:19
MH17 crisis exposes EU's own troubles

The Epic 2,200-Mile Tour De France Is Also A Test Of Epic Eating

NPR News - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:12

Tour de France cyclists need to eat up to 9,000 calories a day to maintain their health and weight during the race. But many teams hire chefs to elevate the meals to gourmet status.

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VIDEO: Mayfly swarm fools radar

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:08
Millions of mayflies took to the air in Wisconsin, tricking radar into thinking it was raining

An Animal Makes A $10,000 Deposit, But Not At The Bank

NPR News - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:03

A Beverly Hills auction house has an unusual fossil for sale. It's not an ancient animal. It's something an ancient animal left behind — and it's very, very long.

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