National / International News

VIDEO: Turning tyres into art

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:43
Turning Senegal's discarded rubber into art

VIDEO: Gaza conflict: Allegations of war crimes

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:37
The UN Human Rights Council has appointed an independent commission to investigate allegations of war crimes by both sides in the Israel Gaza conflict. Orla Guerin reports.

Dagenham & Redbridge 6-6 Brentford (2-4 pens)

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:24
Brentford and Dagenham & Redbridge share 12 goals in the joint highest scoring League Cup tie in history.

VIDEO: 'I went to a Soviet holiday camp'

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:23
Life in the Soviet Union's top holiday camp

The Perseid Meteor Shower Peaks Overnight

NPR News - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:22

The best time to see the shower, which comes every August, is between 3 and 4 a.m. in your local time zone.

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Guide dogs and guns

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:21
Meet the Americans who can't see but still love guns

Violence levels high at private jail

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:19
There are four times as many violent assaults at a privately-run prison in South Yorkshire than at similar jails, inspectors find.

Head teachers plan own league tables

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:12
Head teachers say they will publish their own independent exam school league tables, bypassing any political involvement.

A love of rugs which led to the stars

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:07
The man who sells rugs to the stars

Vine's six-second superstars cash in

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:05
Vine clip creators cash in on their fame

Rooney named as new Man Utd captain

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 15:01
Manchester United make Wayne Rooney their new captain, with midfielder Darren Fletcher named as vice-captain.

Fleeing Yazidis bring tales of woe

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 14:50
Yazidi refugees tell of horrors as they flee militants in Iraq

Mexican mine 'slow to report leak'

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 14:45
A copper mine in north-west Mexico was slow to report that large quantities of a toxic chemical were spilling into a river last week, officials say.

VIDEO: Yazidi exodus to Syria border

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 14:38
Thousands of people from the Yazidi religious community are seeking safety in northern Iraq, after crossing into Syria by foot and walking back into Kurdistan.

Liverpool agree £12m fee for Moreno

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 14:36
Liverpool agree to pay Sevilla £12m for Spanish left-back Alberto Moreno, with Martin Kelly set to join Crystal Palace.

Pavey, 40, wins Euros 10,000m gold

BBC - Tue, 2014-08-12 14:08
Britain's Jo Pavey, 40, becomes the oldest ever European Championships female gold medalist by winning 10,000m in Zurich.

Uber And Lyft Spar Over Alleged Ride Cancellations

NPR News - Tue, 2014-08-12 14:03

The companies, which help customers request car rides on demand, both say their competitor has intentionally requested and then canceled rides on drivers.

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How Campus Sexual Assaults Came To Command New Attention

NPR News - Tue, 2014-08-12 13:53

In just a few years, the issue has gone from mostly whispers to receiving the attention of the White House. Now, colleges throughout the country are trying to increase awareness about the issue.

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Healthkit is a symptom of tech's rush into health care

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-08-12 13:48

There’s already a lot of buzz building around the iPhone 6, which is expected to be announced in September. Word is that Apple will use its newest phone, and the accompanying release of iOS 8, to make a big push into mobile health. 

The tech giant is reportedly trying to team up with healthcare providers and mobile app developers to track everything from our blood pressure to how many steps we take in a day.

Apple’s not the only company getting into the space. Health care is becoming a hot spot for tech companies. Two of the biggest factors driving tech companies into health care are the smartphone, which is basically a mini computer in your pocket, and the proliferation of cheap sensors, said Dean Sawyer, CEO of Jointly Health

"For example, there’s one patch we’re using called Vital Connect," Sawyer said. "It captures your heart rate, ECG, your respiratory rate, your posture, all from one patch and it’s sending that data out continuously."

Advances in artificial intelligence also make it easier to crunch that data. In Jointly Heath’s case, it uses data to predict when patients with chronic illnesses will get sicker, so doctors can treat them before they land in the hospital. 

Everyone from health care providers to insurers love this because hospital treatments are so expensive, said Michael Chui, who leads research on the impact of information technology for the McKinsey Global Institute.

"The real opportunity here is really around trying to control healthcare costs," he said. 

Chui said the promise of controlling costs is driving demand for this kind of technology among health care providers.

"When we looked at the potential for using big data and other technologies to try to control those costs, we think that up to $300 to $400 billion annually is at stake," he said. 

There’s just as much money to be made as saved. Sawyer of Jointly Health said in his little corner of the market — the "remote patient monitoring space" — there's a projected $18 to $20 billion just over the next four or five years."

Then there’s the job of securing all that data flying around. It’s creating another opportunity for tech companies.

Europe faces produce glut after Russian ban

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-08-12 13:48

Fancy an apple? The Warsaw government hopes so. It’s asked the U.S. to buy apples now that Poland’s farmers have been shut out of their biggest export market: Russia.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has banned most food imports from the EU, the U.S. and other western countries in retaliation for sanctions imposed on Russia over Ukraine. That’s left European farmers, in particular, with the headache of offloading their unwanted produce.

Last year European farmers sold $16 billion worth of food to Russia, which is 12 times what the U.S. supplied. Peter Kendall, a British farming industry spokesman, worries that the EU is losing one of its best customers for milk, butter and cheese.

'They’re taking away a market that takes 300,000 tons of dairy products from the European Union a year. This could have really very damaging impacts," Kendall says.

The answer could be that European farmers will  have to try to sell their surplus produce at a decent price abroad. However, the U.S., Australia and other countries that export to Russia have also been sanctioned and they’ll have their own surpluses to sell.

British pig farmer Jim Leavesley is bracing himself for an influx of pork from Canada and Brazil.

“If you have something like only 5 percent extra supply into the market,” says Leavesley, “this can have a devastating effect upon the whole of the price paid across the whole of the European herd.”

Consumers may be licking their lips at the prospect of lower prices, but they shouldn’t, warns meat industry spokesman Mick Sloyan: Farmers still have to make a living.

"They stop producing if prices go too low and then, subsequently, prices rocket," he says. "So, seeing prices going up or down all over the place really isn’t in the interest of consumers.”

The European Commission has just unveiled a potential solution: They have plans to prop up peach farmers affected by the Russian sanctions. The EU will buy 10 percent of their crop and withdraw it from sale.

So, with peach mountains and milk lakes looming, Europe could soon be adding to its agricultural reserves.

 

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