National / International News

AUDIO: Dentists promise fillings without drills

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 03:14
Nigel Pitts talks to Evan Davis about a new dental treatment that may eliminate the need for fillings.

England confirm Farah to run double

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 03:14
Team England confirm that Mo Farah will run in both the 5,000m and 10,000m at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

French exams hit by rail strike

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 03:09
Rail workers go on strike in France for a sixth day, as almost 700,000 students take their final school exams., the Baccalaureate.

Lights, Lights, Lights, Action! A Crazy New Light Projector

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-16 03:03

What if you could turn your finger into a paintbrush and, in real time, draw anything on any surface (even in the air), then turn your creation into a moving figure? No, don't imagine. Watch this.

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Lights, Lights, Lights, Action! A Crazy New Light Projector

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-16 03:03

What if you could turn your finger into a paintbrush and, in real time, draw anything on any surface (even in the air), then turn your creation into a moving figure? No, don't imagine. Watch this.

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Forced marriage law a 'powerful' step

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:59
A new law in England and Wales making it a criminal offence to force people into marriage sends "a powerful message", campaigners say.

Eavis defends 'keen' Metallica slot

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:56
Glastonbury's Michael Eavis defends Metallica's right to be this year's headline act, saying no band has been as "keen" to play at the festival.

What could China learn from UK?

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:51
What could China learn from the UK?

Militant Group Advances In Iraq, Taking Northern Iraqi Town

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:50

The Iraqi government was trying to verify a claim by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria that the group had killed hundreds of Shiite security forces.

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BBC to take classical music to class

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:40
The BBC is to organise school screenings and concerts as part of a campaign to introduce primary school pupils to classical music.

VIDEO: Russia halts gas supply to Ukraine

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:40
Ukraine says Russia has cut off all gas supplies to Kiev, in a major escalation of a dispute between the two nations.

AUDIO: Councils 'need power' over troubled schools

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:32
David Simmons and Nick Gibb speak to Evan Davis about local councils dealing with troubled schools

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must-have major

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:30

The demand for computer science majors is booming. Even students at liberal arts institutions are itching to learn how to write code and develop artificial intelligence.

It's hard to believe that the field wasn't considered a serious academic discipline back in the 1960s.

Joel Moses has been teaching computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for 47 years. But when he first arrived on campus in 1963, it was to be a founding member of Project MAC.

"Machine Aided Cognition, which is another way of saying artificial intelligence. And Multi Access Computers, which is another way of saying time sharing," Moses explained.

Project MAC marked the beginning of the formal study of computer scienceAt first, administrators were skeptical. They viewed computer science as just a passing fad.

"We had to prove ourselves,” Moses said. “And we did!”

Not only did Moses and his colleagues create time sharing, they automated calculus problems.

“People were pleasantly surprised that a computer could do that as well as humans," Moses said.

Then, in the 1970s, MIT's Lab for Computer Science was born. MIT researchers developed some of the basic programming that led to fax machines, e-mail, and the complex operating systems we all take for granted today. Computer science was finally making its mark.

“There was a turning point,” Moses said. “Sometime in the 80s I thought it was OK to major in computer science."

Today, one-third of all MIT engineering students are computer science majors. And the number of undergrads taking advanced courses in the field is growing.

We have to reach further with equipment and we can only do this with computer science," said PhD candidate Dehann Fourie.

Inside the lab, Fourie is working to program a robot that can both explore the deepest reaches of the ocean and be smart enough to know what it's found.

Ten thousand meters down, you are sort of in this dark abyss,” Fourie said. “Now you have to go do something useful and that doesn't just happen by itself."

"All these things people have talked about for decades are coming to fruition and the computers are getting better and better," said Moses. 

But he admits it's still early days: computer science is just beginning to really tackle speech and facial recognition and to advance artificial intelligence by figuring our how the human brain works.

Listen to Kirk’s extended interview with Joel Moses:

MIT is celebrating 50 years of computer science and the birth of a new field. To commemorate the ocassion, the university has compiled a list of 50 ways Project MAC transformed computer science.

 

How Comp-Sci went from passing fad to must have major

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:30

The demand for computer science majors is booming. Even students at liberal arts institutions are itching to learn how to write code and develop artificial intelligence.

It's hard to believe that the field wasn't considered a serious academic discipline back in the 1960s.

Joel Moses has been teaching computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for 47 years. But when he first arrived on campus in 1963, it was to be a founding member of Project MAC.

"Machine Aided Cognition, which is another way of saying artificial intelligence. And Multi Access Computers, which is another way of saying time sharing," Moses explained.

Project MAC marked the beginning of the formal study of computer scienceAt first, administrators were skeptical. They viewed computer science as just a passing fad.

"We had to prove ourselves,” Moses said. “And we did!”

Not only did Moses and his colleagues create time sharing, they automated calculus problems.

“People were pleasantly surprised that a computer could do that as well as humans," Moses said.

Then, in the 1970s, MIT's Lab for Computer Science was born. MIT researchers developed some of the basic programming that led to fax machines, e-mail, and the complex operating systems we all take for granted today. Computer science was finally making its mark.

“There was a turning point,” Moses said. “Sometime in the 80s I thought it was OK to major in computer science."

Today, one-third of all MIT engineering students are computer science majors. And the number of undergrads taking advanced courses in the field is growing.

We have to reach further with equipment and we can only do this with computer science," said PhD candidate Dehann Fourie.

Inside the lab, Fourie is working to program a robot that can both explore the deepest reaches of the ocean and be smart enough to know what it's found.

Ten thousand meters down, you are sort of in this dark abyss,” Fourie said. “Now you have to go do something useful and that doesn't just happen by itself."

"All these things people have talked about for decades are coming to fruition and the computers are getting better and better," said Moses. 

But he admits it's still early days: computer science is just beginning to really tackle speech and facial recognition and to advance artificial intelligence by figuring our how the human brain works.

Listen to Kirk’s extended interview with Joel Moses:

MIT is celebrating 50 years of computer science and the birth of a new field. To commemorate the ocassion, the university has compiled a list of 50 ways Project MAC transformed computer science.

 

VIDEO: Political stickers to keep or swap

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:29
MPs reveal which stickers they want to keep, give away, or swap of their political colleagues and foes.

Patient sings through throat surgery

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:17
Professional singer Alama Kante sings through surgery to remove a tumour to prevent surgeons damaging her vocal cords.

Will the instability in Iraq flow to the pump?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:17

Oil traders are among the many people keeping a close watch on growing violence in Iraq.

They’re gathering a kind of intelligence, says Phil Flynn, with The PRICE Futures Group in Chicago: “You kind of price in the worst-case scenarios, and then you wait and see if that really happens,” he says.

Traders are worried about what would happen if the world were to lose access to Iraq’s oil, about two million barrels a day, according to Jim Burkhard, head of global oil market research for IHS.

That has traders worried about “spare capacity,” which Burkhard says is like “our emergency supply, in case there is a disruption.”

Right now, total spare capacity worldwide is roughly equal to what Iraq exports.

Paul Sullivan, who teaches courses on energy security at the National Defense University, sounds a note of caution: “The oil is coming out of Iraq without much disruption, except for psychological disruption.”

Still, when it comes to the price of oil, that can be powerful. Even though it takes several weeks for oil to get from the Persian Gulf to U.S. refineries, gas prices are already going up.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, here's what makes up the cost of every gallon of gas pumped at the service station:

$3.66

The average national gas price according to AAA is $3.66 a gallon. If you split that out according to the EIA, that price is made up of costs from crude oil, refining, distribution, marketing, retail costs and taxes. While dependency on foreign oil has decreased, 40 percent of crude oil and petroleum products consumed by Americans is still imported from foreign countries.

$2.45

"The biggest portion of the cost of gas goes to the crude-oil suppliers. This is determined by the world's oil-exporting nations, particularly the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)," according to Kevin Bonsor and Ed Grabianowski of How Stuff Works. Two-thirds of the retail price of gas is from the actual crude oil, and at today's prices that equates to $2.45.

$0.44

Twelve percent of your $3.66 per gallon goes towards refining costs and profits. That's approximately $0.44 cents that goes towards refining the oil and other terminal operations, including crude oil processing, oxygenate additives, product shipment and storage and brand advertising -- as well as profits. This also includes the cost of any oil spills.

$0.33

Gas consumers, you and I, also help cover the cost of franchise fees, rents, wages, environmental fees, credit cards fees and insurance costs. This includes billboard, TV and newspaper ads. These, among a few other costs, are all encompassed in the distribution, marketing, and retail costs and profits, or 9 percent of the retail price for a gallon of gas.

$0.44

And another 12 percent of the retail price goes towards taxes, including, among others, state and federal. Federal taxes averaged around 18.4 cents per gallon and state taxes averaged 23.52 cents per gallon according to the U.S. EIA.

A Chinese Chemical Company And A 'Bath Salts' Epidemic

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:13

When the drugs first appeared, U.S. law enforcement officials had a tough time figuring out what they contained and where they came from. One source was a lab in Shanghai.

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Horseshoe crab blood (and, why conservation pays)

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-16 02:00

Quite possibly, the gentle horseshoe crab has swum ashore during the full and new moons of May and June to spawn for 445 million years. 

Horseshoe crab-like creatures were here when the dinosaurs appeared, and they were here after the dinosaurs disappeared. They survived ancient global warming and ice ages alike. And then people happened. 

“Over a hundred years ago, they were ground up and put on land as a fertilizer,” says Eric Hallerman, professor of fish conservation at Virginia Tech. In places like the Delaware Bay, 90 percent of the crab population was wiped out, and not a great many people cried about it. 

Then in the '70s, people discovered that they need the crabs for something much more valuable.  

“Every human on the face of the earth, if they’ve ever been given an injectable medicine, has been touched by LAL,” says Allen Bergenson with biomedical firm Lonza. 

LAL – Limulus Amebocyte Lysate – is a test for bacterial contamination made from the crab’s blood (usually made without killing the crabs). Lonza is one of four companies that manufacture it. The test is used throughout the medical industry to ensure medical instruments and materials don’t cause fever or complications when introduced to the blood.

It’s among the reasons that, gradually, people and governments started to care about the crab. 

“We’ve created laws that make sure the animals are returned to sea, that require them to be harvested by hand,” says John Dubczak, general manager with biomed company Charles River Endosafe in South Carolina. In that state the industry lobbied to ban fishermen from harvesting hundreds of thousands of crabs to use as bait for sea snails and eels. 

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission intervened in 1998 to relieve pressure on the crab from the bait industry. 

Now, the biomedical industry is competing within itself to see who can use the fewest crabs. 

Charles River has developed a highly sensitive test that only uses one twentieth the normal amount of horseshoe crab’s blood. Lonza has a synthetic version that doesn’t use any crab’s blood. The firms argue, sometimes bitterly, over which product is better. The synthetic version doesn’t have the same regulatory standing as the crab-based version (it’s not currently listed in the United States Pharmacopoeia, an official list of sanctioned drugs and uses), and for now that has dissuaded the pharmaceutical industry from embracing it.

Whatever the result, the competition raises a different way of thinking about nature.

“Instead of nature for nature’s sake, nature for people’s sake,” explains Janet Ranganathan, Vice President for Science and Research at the World Resources Institute. She’s referring to a concept called “Ecosystem Services.” When people realize the value in nature, and then pay to maintain it, everyone wins. 

In many cases, this approach has saved entire ecosystems.

“In the '80s, water quality was degrading in NYC because of development in the Catskill and Delaware watershed,” she says. Instead of building a $6 billion water filtration plant the city spent a fraction of that ($1.5 billion) just protecting the forests that purified water by paying landowners to maintain and restore it. 

It doesn’t always work, of course. Upstream agriculture on the Mississippi causes dead zones downstream that negatively affect fishermen, Ranganathan gives as an example. “You have one industry trumping another,” and polluters don’t have to pay for the disruption in services that nature provides. 

But things appear to be working out somewhat for the horseshoe crabs. Overall, the pressure on their population appears sustainable, according to the ASMFC, though there are troubling declines numbers in certain regions.

In some cases, making money off of nature can be a good way to protect it. 

Referendum abuse 'should be ignored'

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-16 01:55
The Scottish independence debate should not allow itself to be "drowned out" by online abuse, the moderator of the Church of Scotland says.
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