National / International News

Root double ton puts England on top

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 09:58
Joe Root hits a maiden Test double century in England's 575-9 before Sri Lanka close day two of the first Test on 140-1.

VIDEO: Highlights: Mexico 1-0 Cameroon

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 09:55
Mexico beat Cameroon 1-0 in Group A with Oribe Peralta sweeping home a rebound for the game's only goal in the 61st minute.

VIDEO: Film Review - the week's new films

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 09:54
Film critic Mark Kermode reviews the week's film releases including Belle, Devil's Knot, and The Young and Prodigious TS Spivet.

Silence in the library

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 09:50
What happens when a library falls silent

Police ombudsman wins review right

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 09:11
The police ombudsman wins the right to a judicial review of the PSNI chief constable's decision to withhold information about 60 murders.

Marriage and money: Tips before you walk down the aisle

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-13 09:05

We often hear about how money issues in a marriage can be a major catalyst for divorce. Whether it's differences in spending habits, debt loads or credit scores, diverging beliefs and habits can be a huge red flag in a relationship.

A 2009 study by Jeffrey Dew, faculty fellow at the National Marriage Project and an assistant professor of Family, Consumer, and Human Development at Utah State University, found that couples who argue about money once a week were 30 percent more likely to  divorce over time than couples who reported disagreeing about finances just a few times per month.

"The best time [to talk about money] is when you're getting along, when you're in the romantic stage, " says relationship expert Andrea Syrtash "[That's] the very time when you should broach it because you'll probably be more open to listening to each other."

Skirting the issues is a big no-no according to Syrtash.

"Put everything on the table because so much of effective relationships is about managing expectations. You need to go in with your eyes wide open," she says. She says, adding that addressing financial differences also means not skimping on the details. "That doesn't just mean learning about your partner's history and partner's finances.  It's about exposing your own vulnerabilities around this."

Once you have gone through the exercise of coming clean, you may find that you and your partner think differently about money. But, she says that compromise is key.

"That's what partnership is about. You come in with different perspectives and you find common ground," she says. "And where you don't find common ground, the hope is that you'll have ultimately the same core values."

As far as protecting oneself from financial ruin caused be a future spouse, there's always a prenuptial agreement. Syrtash says that while they're not for everyone, prenups are not reserved for the rich and famous.

"For many people, if you earn wildly different salaries [or] if you come from a broken home and marriage feels a little bit overwhelming, they feel more secure having this practical approach should, god forbid, things not work out," she says.

In the end, as with most things concerning love and money, it all comes down to communication and cooperation.

The World's Watching Soccer, But Basketball Is On The Barbershop's Brain

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:59

The most popular global sporting event, the World Cup, kicked off this week in Brazil. But the Barbershop guys are fired up about games closer to home: the NBA finals.

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Remembering Ruby Dee: 'Think Of Me And Feel Encouraged'

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:59

In remembrance of the life of actress and activist Ruby Dee, Tell Me More presents an encore broadcast of Michel Martin's 2007 interview with the legendary actress and activist.

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Stories Of President George H.W. Bush, From 41 Closest Friends

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:58

President George H.W. Bush turned 90 this week. A new CNN documentary 41 On 41 speaks to 41 of his closest family and colleagues. Michel Martin learns more from Executive Producer Mary Kate Cary.

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Could Finland Teach The U.S. A Lesson On Guns?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:57

Host Michel Martin looks at gun culture in the America and abroad, and asks two experts what the U.S. can learn from how other countries handle firearms.

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Sweeping the World Cup office pool

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:52

No one won the $1 billion offered by Warren Buffett and mortgage company Quicken Loans during this year’s March Madness, but that’s not going to stop hopeful American workers from throwing a few bucks into their World Cup office pool.

The tournament is underway and the fate of your bracket is likely sealed, but what are the odds that you actually chose that elusive perfect pick?

It turns out that choosing brackets for the World Cup is a lot more complicated than most other matches.

Josh Levin, the executive editor of Slate and host of their sports podcast Hang Up And Listen, says building a perfect bracket for the World Cup is more challenging than the NCAA for one big reason.

“The bracket transmogrifies based on who wins in the group stage,” he says. “In the NCAA bracket, you know that if Duke wins in the first round, then they're going to play a certain team in the second round. In the World Cup, if Brazil wins first in its group then it’s on the left side of the bracket. If they finish second in the group they'll be on the right side of the bracket.”

Yes, he just used the word transmogrifies in a sentence. “So you kind of need to predict how teams are going to do in space and in time,” Levin says.

The hands down favorite to win the competition, with backing from FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver, is the home team of Brazil. Silver’s Soccer Power Index developed for ESPN puts Brazil at a 45 percent chance of winning.

“There is an algorithm based on past performance, he looks at how teams have done in the World Cup on home soil,” says Levin.

“It considers the fact that Brazil has not lost a competitive game at home since 1975, which is something you'd probably want to factor in. And also Brazil just has a really, really strong team.”

So if you, Josh Levin, and the rest of your office pick the Brazilians to sweep the World Cup then your decisions in the earlier rounds are really going to matter.

“It could come down to the person who picked Columbia to get out of Group C as opposed to Ivory Coast or the prescient prognosticator who had Uruguay making it to the semifinals,” says Levin.

“So you've got to pay close attention to those early round picks.”

Chelsea defender Luiz to join PSG

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:50
Paris St-Germain announce the signing of Chelsea defender David Luiz on a five-year contract.

Oil markets spike on Iraq concerns

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:44
The price of Brent crude spiked on Friday after rising this week over concerns about the ongoing insurgency in Iraq

10 things we didn't know last week

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:42
Drinking strong black coffee cleans your teeth, plus more nuggets from the week's news.

In One Map, The Dramatic Rise Of ISIS In Iraq And Syria

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:41

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, was created just last year, but it has seized many towns and cities in both countries. Here's an animated map showing its gains since the start of 2013.

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Liberals win majority in Ontario

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:40
The Ontario Liberal Party has won a majority in the provincial legislature in a surprising result.

Ukrainian forces win back port city

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:35
Government troops break the rebel hold on the east Ukrainian port city of Mariupol in a dawn raid, as separatists boost their arsenal with tanks.

Don't have cable and want to watch the World Cup?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:34

While only about 3 percent of Americans claim men’s soccer as their favorite sport, the 2014 World Cup seems to have compelled some non-fans to pay attention.

For the next month, as 32 soccer teams face off in Brazil, people from around the globe will be glued to their TV screens. Most of them will be able to watch the games for free. But if you're part of an ever growing contingency of Americans known as "cord cutters," those who have boldly cancelled their cable subscriptions in favor of streaming content on the internet, you’re going to have to get a little more creative.

Four years ago, over 24 million Americans tuned in to watch the World Cup. (No small potatoes, but still a paltry figure when compared to the 111.5 million people who tuned in to watch this year's Super Bowl.) Since then, cord-cutting has increased by 44 percent, from 5.1 million to 7.6 million households.

If you live in one of those homes, the bad news is ABC is only broadcasting a handful of the matches for free on broadcast TV, and won't be putting any of them online. Most of the games will be shown on ESPN, meaning you'll need a cable subscription if you want to watch. (If you do have cable, you can use the WatchESPN digital video service to stream games.)

That is -- if you want to watch in English.

Spanish language broadcast network Univision may be your saving grace. Univision is streaming the first 56 matches at its website (Google's Chrome browser can translate the site if you can't read Spanish) and Univision will broadcast games after the quarterfinals on TV. Univision pulled in two times the number of viewers as ESPN during the 2010 Cup.

For the more savvy internet users among you, the thing all the cool kids are doing to watch this World Cup is to use a VPN, or virtual private network. VPNs essentially fool a streaming service that is restricted to a certain country into thinking you live there. Tunnelbear, VyprVPN, and Unotelly are all popular and easy to use VPNs.

And, of course, there’s always the old fashioned way: Knock off work early, head to your local bar, plop down on a stool, order a drink, look up at the TV and enjoy. This might not be the most healthy or economical way, but it could be the most fun. But as they say in the commercials, please drink responsibly.

Still not satisfied? Deadspin has put together an exhaustive list, game-by-game, or where you can watch each match online.

Can A Female Politician Be Insulted Without It Being Sexist?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:28

Debate is raging online about whether profane chants directed at President Dilma Rousseff during Brazil's World Cup match against Croatia were sexist.

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Few new dads take extra paid leave

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-13 08:24
Fewer than one in 50 new fathers are using their right to extra paid time off if their partner goes back to work after having a baby, latest figures suggest.
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