National / International News

Stranded pigeon in helicopter rescue

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 03:14
A lost pigeon which landed on a North Sea oil platform is flown back to land by helicopter.

Skip lorry driver killed by own truck

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 03:13
A skip lorry driver dies after being run over by his own vehicle as it rolled towards a hospital building, police say.

PODCAST: Calpers could shake up Wall Street

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-08 03:09

The biggest of public pension funds could shake up Wall Street today. More on that. Plus, in the weeks before the Supreme Court reveals its opinion about same-sex marriage again, it is not clear what the U.S. Military will enforce on equality for gay members. We take a closer look. And San Francisco’s city attorney has filed a lawsuit against McDonalds stating the local franchise right next to the Golden Gate Park should be controlling the population that congregate around its doors. But is it a local business responsibility to clean up the area?

Boots sheds 700 jobs in cost-cutting

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 03:02
Boots announces it is to cut about 700 jobs as part of a restructuring, following its merger with US giant Walgreens.

Calpers' quest to pay lower money management fees

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-08 03:00

The California Public Employees’ Retirement System, the nation’s largest public pension fund, is expected to announce Monday that it’s taking a big red marker to the list of firms managing its money, cutting their number by roughly half.

At the heart of this is an attempt to lower the amount of money the pension giant pays to companies that manage its billions, says Kent Smetters, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

Smetters expects other pension funds to follow Calpers’ lead.

Calpers also recently announced they were getting out of hedge funds for a similar reason.

Why this focus on lowering expenses?

“They’re only about 77 percent funded,” says Robert Pozen, who teaches at Harvard Business School. “Unfortunately, like most of these funds, they don’t have enough money now to invest to pay all these benefits over time.”

Pozen says by investing more money with fewer firms, Calpers will have more clout to negotiate lower fees. Cutting those costs now means more money for pensioners in the future. 

VIDEO: Gay 'sin' sacking woman wins case

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:58
A Christian nursery worker who was sacked for telling a lesbian colleague that "homosexuality is a sin" wins a discrimination claim against her employer.

DNA collected from China ship dead

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:55
China completes the DNA collection needed to identify the 432 bodies recovered so far from the Yangtze boat disaster.

Day 2 Of G-7 Meeting Focuses On Climate Change, Terrorism

NPR News - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:55

The first day was dominated by talks on Russia, which was left out of the meeting for the second year. President Obama declared that the U.S. was "inseparable" from its European allies.

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Sol Campbell plans London mayor bid

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:40
Former England footballer Sol Campbell confirms his intention to run as a candidate for the Mayor of London.

France trial for 'magic cheese scam'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:37
A woman goes on trial in France for allegedly operating a scam in which thousands of Chileans paid millions to produce a supposedly "magic cheese" for use in cosmetics.

'UDA involved' in fatal Derry attack

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:24
The father of a Londonderry man, who died following a sectarian attack in 2006, says he believes the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) was involved in the attack.

No party can rule alone - Erdogan

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:22
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says an inconclusive election result means no party can govern alone and urges the nation's political forces to act responsibly.

Salazar claims could 'dog' Farah

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:20
Doping allegations aimed at coach Alberto Salazar could "dog" Mo Farah's career, says UK Athletics chairman Ed Warner.

VIDEO: Groundhogs, Pacino & golf buggy stunts

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:19
Watch an alternative take on the weekend's Formula 1 action as we pick out some of the lighter moments as Lewis Hamilton cruises to a comfortable win in Canada.

Voters 'relieved at Labour loss'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:18
Acting leader Harriet Harman says many Labour voters were privately relieved at the party's election loss, as they felt it had the "wrong message".

Turkey: Bloody nose for Erdogan

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:13
What now for Turkey's long-dominant AK Party, asks the BBC's Mark Lowen in Istanbul.

Eritrea 'ruled by fear, not law'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:06
Eritrea carries out systematic and widespread human rights abuses on a massive scale, driving some 5,000 people a month to flee, a UN report says.

Tesla challenge to dealers goes beyond electric cars

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:00

Tesla Motors is in a state by state fight to sell its electric cars directly to consumers. States have strong franchise laws that give only dealers that privilege, and dealers are using their political power to keep it that way. But maybe not all of them. Some on Wall Street think a few dealers might be fine with Tesla getting its way.

The issue is way bigger than Tesla, which sells a relative handful of cars. Franchise laws protect dealers from competition. But they can also make it tricky for certain dealers to get bigger.

“If these laws were amended or liberalized more to open up the opportunities that dealers have to consolidate, that would actually be to their advantage,” says Dan Crane, associate dean at Michigan’s Law School.

Crane and other Tesla supporters say that opening up the system would lower prices for consumers. But it could also set off a wave of mergers. There are thousands of car dealers. Buyouts could shrink that to hundreds, even dozens. Many established dealers don’t want that, so they’re fighting to preserve their franchise laws.

Click the media player above to hear more.

Mark Garrison: If you wanna dig into franchise laws, buckle up, says longtime auto exec Gerry Meyers.

Gerry Meyers: I’m glad you raised the subject, because it’s a can of worms.

And it’s way bigger than Tesla, which only sells a handful of cars in any case. Franchise laws protect dealers from competition. But they can also make it tricky for certain dealers to get bigger, says Dan Crane, associate dean at Michigan’s Law School.

Dan Crane: If these laws were amended or liberalized more to open up the opportunities that dealers have to consolidate, that would actually be to their advantage.

Crane and other Tesla supporters argue opening up the system would lower prices for consumers. But it could also set off a wave of mergers. There are thousands of car dealers. Buyouts could shrink that to hundreds, even dozens. But many established dealers don’t want that, so they’re fighting.

Brian Terr: They’re tremendously strong.

Edmunds.com VP Brian Terr says dealer political power, built on jobs and money they bring local communities, means franchise laws will be tough to change anytime soon. I'm Mark Garrison, for Marketplace.

Some gay veterans get fewer benefits

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:00

The Senate resumes debate on Monday on the National Defense Authorization Act, after last week failing to pass an amendment that would have changed the law to ensure all married gay veterans receive the same benefits as their straight counterparts.

Currently, the law says the VA can only consider a veteran married if the marriage is legal in the state where that veteran lives. That means in 13 states, where same-sex marriage is not legal, gay vets lose out on some benefits.

Ashley Broadway, who lives in Virginia where same-sex marriage is legal, is the president of The American Military Partner Association, an advocacy group.

"I'm a spouse of an almost 20-year active duty service member," who is planning to retire in a few years, Broadway says. They have two children together. And, Broadway says, they are concerned about where they will live in the future.

Broadway wants a change in the law so that wherever they move in retirement, "we would be able to have the same type of benefits that our straight counterparts [have]."

Those benefits include certain disability benefits, which are increased for married vets with children, and certain medical benefits which are available to their family members.

The amendment that failed last week was offered by New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

"If anybody ought to be treated equally, it ought to be those people who have put their lives on the line for this country," Shaheen says.

The issue could be moot if the Supreme Court rules in favor of same-sex marriage, in a decision that is expected by the end of June. But if the high court's ruling is more nuanced and open to interpretation, Shaheen says a bill may be the way to address the issue.

Some gay veterans get less benefits

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-08 02:00

The Senate resumes debate on Monday on the National Defense Authorization Act, after last week failing to pass an amendment that would have changed the law to ensure all married gay veterans receive the same benefits as their straight counterparts.

Currently, the law says the VA can only consider a veteran married if the marriage is legal in the state where that veteran lives. That means in 13 states, where same-sex marriage is not legal, gay vets lose out on some benefits.

Ashley Broadway, who lives in Virginia where same-sex marriage is legal, is the president of The American Military Partner Association, an advocacy group.

"I'm a spouse of an almost 20-year active duty service member," who is planning to retire in a few years, Broadway says. They have two children together. And, Broadway says, they are concerned about where they will live in the future.

Broadway wants a change in the law so that wherever they move in retirement, "we would be able to have the same type of benefits that our straight counterparts [have]."

Those benefits include certain disability benefits, which are increased for married vets with children, and certain medical benefits which are available to their family members.

The amendment that failed last week was offered by New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

"If anybody ought to be treated equally, it ought to be those people who have put their lives on the line for this country," Shaheen says.

The issue could be moot if the Supreme Court rules in favor of same-sex marriage, in a decision that is expected by the end of June. But if the high court's ruling is more nuanced and open to interpretation, Shaheen says a bill may be the way to address the issue.

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