National / International News

Arson spree suspect charged by police

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 12:22
A man is charged with arson after a spate of fires in Oxfordshire, including one that caused major damage to a council headquarters.

Teens Who Skimp On Sleep Now Have More Drinking Problems Later

NPR News - Fri, 2015-01-16 12:12

Missing out on sleep can lead to more than grumpiness. Teenagers who aren't getting enough sleep are also more apt to binge drink, a study finds, even years later.

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Chinese Spy Chief Latest Snared In Anti-Corruption Campaign

NPR News - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:52

Ma Jian, vice-minister in the Ministry of State Security, has reportedly been detained, possibly for insider trading. He would be the highest-ranking official to be caught in the ongoing probe.

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Gay kiss ban sparks Austria protest

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:50
Some 2,000 people stage a protest in Vienna after a lesbian couple were thrown out of a renowned cafe in Austria's capital for kissing.

VIDEO: Watch McIlroy's first hole-in-one

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:48
World number one Rory McIlroy records his first professional hole-in-one on day two of the Abu Dhabi Championship.

Fun fact Friday: Millions #TBT to their MySpace days

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:47

Leigh Gallagher with Fortune Magazine, and Sudeep Reddy with the Wall Street Journal talk with David Gura about the week's top stories. 

What else did we learn this week?

Fun fact: 50.6 million people still visit MySpace each month.

Thanks, millennial nostalgia. MySpace's most trafficked day of the week is Thursday due to people trying to find their old pictures to post on Instagram for “Throwback Thursday” or #TBT. 

Marketplace Tech's Silicon Tally quiz discussed this fun fact and others, including one about a glitter delivery service.

Silicon Tally: Et tu, glitter? Fun fact: The $2 bill has a historically dirty reputation: It’s the standard bet at a racetrack, often the amount of a political bribe and used to be standard payment for a lady of the night.

Coming soon: An entire documentary about $2 bills.

Why are there so few $2 bills? Fun fact: Sylvester Stallone is the actor who has the most Golden Raspberry nominations, which recognize the year’s worst in film. He's gotten 30.

Apparently he’s not a fan of the awards show, but they’re not a fan of him either.

The Razzies: Lampooning Hollywood for 35 years Fun fact: 30 to 35 percent of water pumped through the pipelines of utilities worldwide is lost to leaks and bursts.

The leaks add up to about 8.6 trillion gallons of water lost worldwide each year.

'Smart' devices used to hunt for water leaks Fun fact: “Wake me up” by Avicii is the most Shazam’d song of all time with 15 million-plus Shazams and counting.

At least someone is benefiting from that incessant earworm.

Shazam CEO: Introducing visual 'Shazaming'

Heavy snowfall causes transport woes

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:47
Heavy snowfall across southern and central Scotland on Friday evening leads to long delays on major transport networks.

U.S. Supreme Court Will Rule On Gay Marriage This Term

NPR News - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:46

The justices said today they will review restrictions on same-sex marriages in Ohio, Tennessee, Michigan and Kentucky. The case will be argued in April; a decision is expected by late June.

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Swiss move on franc catches currency brokers off guard

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:42

Fallout continues from the Swiss National Bank’s decision to stop pegging its currency to the euro. As the franc rapidly rose in value, many investors were caught off guard and suffered large loses.

In many cases, those trades were heavily leveraged, meaning customers might have to put down only a small percentage of the trade's value as a deposit. If they can’t pay their losses, their brokerage firms will be left holding the bag in some cases – and a handful are now raising zn alarm about their own financial health, says Boris Schlossberg of BK Asset Management.

Outside of brokerages and some financial institutions, don't expect the franc’s ripple effect to spread very far, says Nick Bennenbroek, head of foreign exchange strategy at Wells Fargo. However, in situations like this, uncertainty in one market can spread to others, and volatile exchange rates can be problematic for companies operating across multiple currencies, says Kevin Jacques, a professor at Baldwin Wallace University and former Treasury official.

 

Libel bill may cost blogger her home

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:25
A blogger is facing the prospect of having to sell her home after the deadline to pay libel damages to the chief executive of Carmarthenshire council passed.

Snowfall ends Rangers-Hearts game

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:22
The Championship match between Rangers and Hearts at Ibrox is abandoned at 0-0 after 25 minutes due to snow on the pitch.

Major health care player gets ready to retire

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:09

The most important person in health care you've never heard of said Friday she plans to retire next month. Marilyn Tavenner runs the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and oversees those two giant health care programs. What makes her job so important? To borrow a phrase from E.F. Hutton – when CMS talks, people listen. Why? 

The usual: money and power.

What DeSean Jackson Taught Us About Economic Mobility

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:08

Last year, the Philadelphia Eagles cut their star player DeSean Jackson over concerns that he still had ties to violent gangs in the Los Angeles neighborhood where he grew up. The incident highlighted the complicated connection between neighborhood, wealth, income, and the economic gaps that many people from poor neighborhoods can fall into when things go bad -- even after they've "made it." We revisit what the Jackson incident taught us, and talk to Jamelle Bouie of Slate, who writes about the connection between neighborhood, housing, race, and economic mobility.

Missing eagle Norman has landed

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:04
A golden eagle that escaped from a Bedfordshire falconer is found.

Your Wallet: Leaps

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:52

We're exploring leaps in our economy, and in our lives. We want to know, did you ever collect yourself and go for it?

Maybe buy that house? Get married?

Or jump into a big new financial commitment ...

We want to hear the dramatic stories of your leap. How did you land?

 

Itinerant bees have an important role in economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:36

Most gaps, whether they're global or personal, are pretty easy to see, or visualize. But there's a major economic gap in agriculture that's invisible, for now. And that's because it's being filled. By bees. 

Without bees, we'd lose more than honey.... We'd lose billions of dollars from our economy – $15 billion each year in the U.S. alone and $100 billion globally.

And we might taste the gap, too: Without bees, our plates would be a lot less colorful. Bees are crucial to the farming of fruits and vegetables, as well as grains, and meat (which relies on cattle fed on alfalfa, which depends on bees).

We spoke with Noah Wilson-Rich, founder of urban beekeeping business The Best Bees Company, about how to keep bees happy, healthy and productive in our economy.

He's trying to change the way most bees live now, which is a little bit like long-haul truckers.

About half of all honey bees in the United States live on flatbed trucks, in rest stops or on planes. They travel from crop to crop, pollinating flowers and collecting nectar for their own food throughout the year.

Bee travel is a function of monoculture crops: because there isn't enough food for bees in any one place, they move between agricultural hot spots. Bees pollinate almond blossoms in California, blueberries in Maine and then move on to cranberries, apples, oranges, lemons, traveling the country.

Wilson-Rich focuses on urban beekeeping as a way to keep bees healthy and stop all the travel. Bees, like most creatures, are healthier when they eat a varied diet. And recently, research has shown that bees produce more honey in urban settings than rural ones. 

Companies like The Best Bee Company integrate hives into cities, attaching them to homes, apartments, businesses and schools. 

As humans live more harmoniously alongside bees, Wilson-Rich says, the bee population will continue to increase, reaching levels that existed before colony collapse disorder depleted their number in 2006. 

To hear more about the bee economy, listen to the interview in the player above. 

Itinerant bees play an important role in economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:36

Most gaps, whether they're global or personal, are pretty easy to see, or visualize. But there's a major economic gap in agriculture that's invisible, for now. And that's because it's being filled. By bees. 

Without bees, we'd lose more than honey.... We'd lose billions of dollars from our economy – $15 billion each year in the U.S. alone and $100 billion globally.

And we might taste the gap, too: Without bees, our plates would be a lot less colorful. Bees are crucial to the farming of fruits and vegetables, as well as grains, and meat (which relies on cattle fed on alfalfa, which depends on bees).

We spoke with Noah Wilson-Rich, founder of urban beekeeping business The Best Bees Company, about how to keep bees happy, healthy and productive in our economy.

He's trying to change the way most bees live now, which is a little bit like long-haul truckers.

About half of all honey bees in the United States live on flatbed trucks, in rest stops or on planes. They travel from crop to crop, pollinating flowers and collecting nectar for their own food throughout the year.

Bee travel is a function of monoculture crops: because there isn't enough food for bees in any one place, they move between agricultural hot spots. Bees pollinate almond blossoms in California, blueberries in Maine and then move on to cranberries, apples, oranges, lemons, traveling the country.

Wilson-Rich focuses on urban beekeeping as a way to keep bees healthy and stop all the travel. Bees, like most creatures, are healthier when they eat a varied diet. And recently, research has shown that bees produce more honey in urban settings than rural ones. 

Companies like The Best Bee Company integrate hives into cities, attaching them to homes, apartments, businesses and schools. 

As humans live more harmoniously alongside bees, Wilson-Rich says, the bee population will continue to increase, reaching levels that existed before colony collapse disorder depleted their number in 2006. 

To hear more about the bee economy, listen to the interview in the player above. 

The bee economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:36

Most gaps, whether they're global or personal, are pretty easy to see, or visualize. But there's a major economic gap in agriculture that's invisible, for now. And that's because it's being filled. By bees. 

 

Without bees, we'd lose more than honey.... We'd lose billions of dollars from our economy – $15 billion each year in the U.S. alone and $100 billion globally. 

 

And we might taste the gap, too: Without bees, our plates would be a lot less colorful. Bees are crucial to the farming of fruits and vegetables, as well as grains, and meat (which relies on cattle fed on alfalfa, which depends on bees).

 

We spoke with Noah Wilson-Rich, founder of urban beekeeping business The Best Bees Company, about how to keep bees happy, healthy and productive in our economy. 

 

He's trying to change the way most bees live now, which is a little bit like long-haul truckers.

 

About half of all honey bees in the United States live on flatbed trucks, in rest stops or on planes. They travel from crop to crop, pollinating flowers and collecting nectar for their own food throughout the year. 

 

Bee travel is a function of monoculture crops: because there isn't enough food for bees in any one place, they move between agricultural hot spots. Bees pollinate almond blossoms in California, blueberries in Maine and then move on to cranberries, apples, oranges, lemons, traveling the country. 

 

Wilson-Rich focuses on urban beekeeping as a way to keep bees healthy and stop all the travel. Bees, like most creatures, are healthier when they eat a varied diet. And recently, research has shown that bees produce more honey in urban settings than rural ones. 

 

Companies like The Best Bee Company integrate hives into cities, attaching them to homes, apartments, businesses and schools. 

 

As humans live more harmoniously alongside bees, Wilson-Rich says, the bee population will continue to increase, reaching levels that existed before colony collapse disorder depleted their number in 2006. 

 

To hear more about the bee economy, listen to the interview in the player above. 

Fla. Police Department Used Black Mug Shots For Target Practice

NPR News - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:35

The practice was discovered when a National Guard sergeant found that one of the mug shots was her brother's. The North Miami Beach police chief says pictures of whites and Hispanics are also used.

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Jailed ex-marine's debate postponed

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:33
A debate on a former Royal Marine's murder conviction for killing an Afghan insurgent is postponed at the request of his family.

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