National / International News

Cipriani set to receive England call

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:46
Danny Cipriani and Nick Easter are poised to be included in the England training squad for the Six Nations opener against Wales.

LRA leader on way to Hague court

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:45
A Lords Resistance Army (LRA) leader, Dominic Ongwen, is on his way to The Hague from Africa to face war crimes charges.

Pope Francis Says Catholics Don't Need To Breed 'Like Rabbits'

NPR News - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:41

On his return from a week-long trip to Asia, Pope Francis emphasized the church's ban on artificial means of birth control and said Catholics should practice "responsible parenthood."

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VIDEO: Apology for playground tear gas

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:40
The Kenyan government has apologised after tear gas was fired at children who were protesting over the sale of their playground to a private developer.

4 Linked To Paris Attack Appear In French Court

NPR News - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:23

The four men, all in their 20s, are accused of providing logistical support to Ahmed Coulibaly, the gunman who took hostages at a Kosher supermarket during the Jan. 7-9 Paris attacks.

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Barbie Has Some Royal Competition In Nigeria

NPR News - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:23

The Queens of Africa are based on Nigeria's three largest groups — Igbo, Yuruba and Hausa — and each has traits meant to empower the girls who play with them.

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State of the Union, by the numbers

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:20
33,667

Jimmy Carter's 1981 State of the Union address holds the record for lengthiest speech, in terms of words – it had 33,667 of them. That's only about 10,000 words shy of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby." President Obama’s 2014 speech was a relatively concise 6,989 words. George Washington’s 1790 address holds the record for the speech with the fewest words, 1,089. 

 

1923

In 1923, Calvin Coolidge's State of the Union address was the first broadcast on the radio. The New York Times predicted that Coolidge's voice "will be heard by more people than the voice of any man in history.

  

228

Since George Washington’s inaugural speech in 1790, a total of 228 State of the Unions have been delivered. Some were delivered in the form of letters, not speeches. Thomas Jefferson was the first president to present a State of the Union in a letter format, with some historians claiming that Jefferson believed in-person delivery too closely resembled a British monarch addressing parliament and others attributing the outcome to his shyness.

 

43.3 percent

Of the proposals delivered during a speech, 43.3 percent, on average, actually are enacted during the following year, according to data collected from 1965 to 2002. But the actual legislative success varies from year to year.

Senate.gov

26

Since 1972, presidents have mainly worn colored ties along a blue spectrum. Over the ensuing years, the American public has witnessed 26 State of the Unions in which a president has worn a tie in shades of blue and 16 in shades of red. President Clinton must have missed the memo on colored neckwear, pulling off a dark and yellow polka dot number in 1998.

JOE MARQUETTE/AFP/Getty Images

VIDEO: The Jihadist who faked his death

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:12
A jihadist who faked his death so that he could return to the UK undetected has admitted four terrorism offences.

The Inner City Might Not Be To Blame For High Asthma Rates

NPR News - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:11

Children who live in inner cities in the Northeast are much more likely to have asthma. But a wider look finds that poor children in the suburbs are at high risk, too.

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Police radar looks through walls

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:57
The use of a radar device that can see through walls has been questioned by privacy experts in the US.

Woman tells of Glitter 'sex attack'

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:49
A woman who Gary Glitter allegedly tried to rape as a child "felt uncomfortable" at his presence but did not want to be rude and push him away, a court hears.

Guinean priests beaten up over Ebola

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:48
Three priests from a Baptist church in Guinea are beaten up and held hostage because local people mistook them for Ebola awareness campaigners.

How Your Food Gets The 'Non-GMO' Label

NPR News - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:48

Demand for foods certified as GMO-free is ballooning. Increasingly, it's conventional companies that want to earn the label. Here's how a company gets into the non-GMO game.

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DNA tests on Mexican bodies fail

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:45
Forensic scientists in Austria have failed to match burnt human remains with DNA samples in the Mexican inquiry into 43 missing students, officials say.

VIDEO: A Richer World... but for whom?

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:36
The BBC's new A Richer World season is exploring global wealth, poverty and inequality. But what exactly does a richer world mean?

Malpractice Changes In Massachusetts Offer Injured Patients New Options

NPR News - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:17

Hospitals in the state are among the leaders in developing alternatives to medical liability litigation. A recently enacted law helps consumers who want to challenge hospitals and doctors.

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Defoe relishes Sunderland pressure

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:10
Jermain Defoe is happy to deal with the expectation he will score the goals to secure Sunderland's Premier League safety.

VIDEO: Is China really in economic trouble?

BBC - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:01
What China's GDP figures mean - in 60 secs

Winner reveals inside scoop on game show prizes

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:00

Congratulations! You've just won a ton of money and prizes on a game show.

But before you redraw your floor plans to accommodate those new kitchen appliances you won, consider the following:

1. The show may substitute cash for some of your prizes.

The video above shows just one way I got lucky when I won on "The Price is Right" back in 2010. I was quite pleasantly surprised, but still confused, when I was handed my prize paperwork. I discovered that instead of the three-month virtual assistant service, among other things, I had just won in my "showcase," I was getting the cash value instead.

On my prize sheet, certain prizes are labeled "C-I-L": cash in lieu. I wasn't given the option to receive the actual prize instead, and I couldn't trade one of the other prizes I won for their cash value, either.

As Art Alisi explains, that's because the show buys some of their prizes — and there's a way to tell if they did, if you listen closely during the show. "When they say, I’m just gonna say Goodyear tires [as an example], 'You've won a set of Goodyear tires, from the number one store, Goodyear,' then you know that was promoted. If they just said you won a wonderful set of rubber tires, they bought it. So it’s just as easy for them to give you the cash."

Again, not that I'm complaining.

2. Reruns once meant more gifts.

One thing should be made abundantly clear: If your show airs as a rerun during the off-season, you don't get paid a second time.

"Jeopardy!," among many other shows, used to give sponsored parting gifts to departing contestants – the classic Rice-A-Roni comes to mind. They don't do that anymore. My "parting gifts" from "Jeopardy!" amounted to a tote bag, a T-shirt and a glass frame for my photo with Alex Trebek.

When Jerome Vered played in the 1992 Tournament of Champions, he finished in third place and received the announced third-place parting gifts in addition to his runner-up prize of $7,500. What he didn't realize was that when his tournament games aired again over the summer, the show changed the fee plugs at the end of the episode.

"So about a month later, as a loser, I get this huge package from "Jeopardy!" of all these ... left-handed toothbrushes and all these other things they were giving away. I got a whole 'nother set, like a residual, but I didn’t actually get my money again."

These days, all you get for a rerun is a second chance to record your episode.

3. You don't receive your winnings immediately.

You don't get to drive off the set in the new car you just won, nor do they immediately pay you any money you win once you step off the stage. It usually takes between 90 and 150 days to receive your prizes.

Alisi says the prize department needs to verify that you are indeed who you say you are when you go on the show....

Alisi says: "I had one where someone told me he was an admiral, and the FBI came in and wanted to know where we found this man. And they told us, 'He’s not an admiral, he’s been impersonating an admiral for 30 years.' They arrested him, and whatever he won, they took away."

.. .and to make sure you've paid your taxes on your prizes. In the case of "The Price is Right," out-of-state contestants like me have to pay California state taxes before accepting any prize. "Let's say you're in Illinois, and we sent the prizes, and you didn't pay the taxes," Alisi says. "We're liable to pay those taxes. So we make sure you've paid the state taxes before we deliver the prizes."

Once a prize is won, the show contacts the appropriate prize supplier to let them know they'll need to save an extra – let's just say –desk chair for the lucky contestant. "We have to notify the prize providers to say that they’re going to be on the show, and then we send them another certification saying you have 90 days to send the gift," says Alisi.

4. The show isn't the only entity paying out prize money. 

Prizes for our second and third place contestants provided by Aleve.

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures Television

Call it a sneaky way to get in some additional advertising, but in the case of the above photo, Aleve will actually cut the runners-up a check for the standard second- and third-place prize.

You see it elsewhere, too. When "Wheel of Fortune" used to have the "Jackpot Round," which would be prefaced by a short plug for the round's sponsor. The arrangement with the show was similar to that of the Aleve plug "Jeopardy!" uses today, but with a significant difference. 

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures Television

Aleve pays out $3,000 an episode, because, unless something strange happens, every show will have someone finishing in both second and third place. However, the sponsor of the "Jackpot Round," says former prize coordinator Adam Nedeff, only had to pay out when the jackpot was won. If it wasn't won, which was most of the time, the sponsor effectively got a free commercial. 

But suppose there was a week when the Jackpot was won every time it was offered. Nedeff says the sponsor only was responsible for paying three of those Jackpots; "Wheel" would pay the rest, and the sponsor would get the free commercial on those nights anyway.

"That was the best way to get the sales pitch," Nedeff says, "because the sponsor of that round is getting a fantastic deal. It’s not, 'Hey, it’s "Wheel of Fortune," it’s this fantastic show that all of America is watching,' it’s, 'You are getting a really, really cheap commercial here.'”

5. Trips aren't always worth as much as the show says they're worth.

It's no secret that game show winners are taxed on whatever they win, and the amount of taxes a contestant has to pay partly depends on the value of the prizes they win.

In the case of trip prizes, though, the value announced on the show may be different from what the player is actually taxed on, because the value announced on the show reflects the price of the trip during the sponsoring hotel's peak season.

"One of the things we have to hammer home is that we have to honor blackout dates," says Nedeff. "A lot of places do not want to offer a trip that’s going to be redeemed during Thanksgiving or Christmas weeks, because that’s the week when the big money is coming in for the hotels."

Contestant paperwork explicitly states that winners of trips have up to 365 days following their airdate to redeem their prize, so the value of the trip can fluctuate depending on when the trip is taken.

"If the person actually did redeem the trip, we would find out what the comparable rate would have been for the time of year that they were staying there," says Nedeff. "And when it came time to pay the taxes for their prizes, the contestant was only taxed on what they would have paid during the offseason."

5 things you didn't know about game show prizes ... unless you've won one

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:00

Congratulations! You've just won a ton of money and prizes on a game show.

But before you redraw your floor plans to accommodate those new kitchen appliances you won, consider the following:

1. The show may substitute cash for some of your prizes.

The video above shows just one way I got lucky when I won on "The Price is Right" back in 2010. I was quite pleasantly surprised, but still confused, when I was handed my prize paperwork. I discovered that instead of the three-month virtual assistant service, among other things, I had just won in my "Showcase Showdown," I was getting the cash value instead.

On my prize sheet, certain prizes are labeled "C-I-L": cash in lieu. I wasn't given the option to receive the actual prize instead, and I couldn't trade one of the other prizes I won for their cash value, either.

As Art Alisi explains, that's because the show buys some of their prizes — and there's a way to tell if they did, if you listen closely during the show. "When they say, I’m just gonna say Goodyear tires [as an example], 'You've won a set of Goodyear tires, from the number one store, Goodyear,' then you know that was promoted. If they just said you won a wonderful set of rubber tires, they bought it. So it’s just as easy for them to give you the cash."

Again, not that I'm complaining.

2. Reruns once meant more gifts.

One thing should be made abundantly clear: If your show airs as a rerun during the off-season, you don't get paid a second time.

"Jeopardy!," among many other shows, used to give sponsored parting gifts to departing contestants – the classic Rice-A-Roni comes to mind. They don't do that anymore. My "parting gifts" from "Jeopardy!" amounted to a tote bag, a T-shirt and a glass frame for my photo with Alex Trebek.

When Jerome Vered played in the 1992 Tournament of Champions, he finished in third place and received the announced third-place parting gifts in addition to his runner-up prize of $7,500. What he didn't realize was that when his tournament games aired again over the summer, the show changed the fee plugs at the end of the episode.

"So about a month later, as a loser, I get this huge package from "Jeopardy!" of all these ... left-handed toothbrushes and all these other things they were giving away. I got a whole 'nother set, like a residual, but I didn’t actually get my money again."

These days, all you get for a rerun is a second chance to record your episode.

3. You don't receive your winnings immediately.

You don't get to drive off the set in the new car you just won, nor do they immediately pay you any money you win once you step off the stage. It usually takes between 90 and 150 days to receive your prizes.

Alisi says the prize department needs to verify that you are indeed who you say you are when you go on the show....

Alisi says: "I had one where someone told me he was an admiral, and the FBI came in and wanted to know where we found this man. And they told us, 'He’s not an admiral, he’s been impersonating an admiral for 30 years.' They arrested him, and whatever he won, they took away."

.. .and to make sure you've paid your taxes on your prizes. In the case of "The Price is Right," out-of-state contestants like me have to pay California state taxes before accepting any prize. "Let's say you're in Illinois, and we sent the prizes, and you didn't pay the taxes," Alisi says. "We're liable to pay those taxes. So we make sure you've paid the state taxes before we deliver the prizes."

Once a prize is won, the show contacts the appropriate prize supplier to let them know they'll need to save an extra – let's just say –desk chair for the lucky contestant. "We have to notify the prize providers to say that they’re going to be on the show, and then we send them another certification saying you have 90 days to send the gift," says Alisi.

4. The show isn't the only entity paying out prize money. 

Prizes for our second and third place contestants provided by Aleve.

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures Television

Call it a sneaky way to get in some additional advertising, but in the case of the above photo, Aleve will actually cut the runners-up a check for the standard second- and third-place prize.

You see it elsewhere, too. When "Wheel of Fortune" used to have the "Jackpot Round," which would be prefaced by a short plug for the round's sponsor. The arrangement with the show was similar to that of the Aleve plug "Jeopardy!" uses today, but with a significant difference. 

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures Television

Aleve pays out $3,000 an episode, because, unless something strange happens, every show will have someone finishing in both second and third place. However, the sponsor of the "Jackpot Round," says former prize coordinator Adam Nedeff, only had to pay out when the jackpot was won. If it wasn't won, which was most of the time, the sponsor effectively got a free commercial. 

But suppose there was a week when the Jackpot was won every time it was offered. Nedeff says the sponsor only was responsible for paying three of those Jackpots; "Wheel" would pay the rest, and the sponsor would get the free commercial on those nights anyway.

"That was the best way to get the sales pitch," Nedeff says, "because the sponsor of that round is getting a fantastic deal. It’s not, 'Hey, it’s "Wheel of Fortune," it’s this fantastic show that all of America is watching,' it’s, 'You are getting a really, really cheap commercial here.'”

5. Trips aren't always worth as much as the show says they're worth.

It's no secret that game show winners are taxed on whatever they win, and the amount of taxes a contestant has to pay partly depends on the value of the prizes they win.

In the case of trip prizes, though, the value announced on the show may be different from what the player is actually taxed on, because the value announced on the show reflects the price of the trip during the sponsoring hotel's peak season.

"One of the things we have to hammer home is that we have to honor blackout dates," says Nedeff. "A lot of places do not want to offer a trip that’s going to be redeemed during Thanksgiving or Christmas weeks, because that’s the week when the big money is coming in for the hotels."

Contestant paperwork explicitly states that winners of trips have up to 365 days following their airdate to redeem their prize, so the value of the trip can fluctuate depending on when the trip is taken.

"If the person actually did redeem the trip, we would find out what the comparable rate would have been for the time of year that they were staying there," says Nedeff. "And when it came time to pay the taxes for their prizes, the contestant was only taxed on what they would have paid during the offseason."

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