National / International News

Bath 16-30 Northampton

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 05:40
Stephen Myler kicks 20 points as Northampton Saints come from behind to beat Bath and win the Amlin Challenge Cup.

Bjorn equals Wentworth record

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 05:39
Thomas Bjorn cards eight birdies and an eagle as he equals the course record in BMW PGA Championship first round.

NATO Says It Sees 'Limited' Russian Troop Activity Near Ukraine

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-22 05:19

NATO officials say they're seeing signs Russian troops might withdraw from its border with Ukraine, although many soldiers remain in the area.

» E-Mail This

Man died after A&E hospital wait

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 05:16
A man died after having to wait more than four hours in an ambulance because there was no room in a hospital in south Wales, an inquest hears.

VIDEO: What can you do in a polling station?

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 05:10
Electoral experts are tested on their knowledge of what voters can - or cannot do - in a polling station.

VIDEO: Does the weather affect voter turnout?

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:56
BBC weatherman Matt Taylor looks at the UK forecast for Thursday, as some voters head to the polls.

British home buyers fear a 'super bubble'

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:49

There’s an old saying that an Englishman's home is his castle.

If he lives in London, it's likely to be a pretty small castle, and there definitely won't be room for a moat -- unless he’s prepared to pay a king's ransom.

House prices in the British capital are rising at breakneck speed, fueling talk of a price bubble, or even a superbubble.

Prices rose 18 percent last year, according to a recent survey by the Nationwide Building Society. The average price of a home in the British capital is now more than $600,000.    In a desirable part of town, a simple two-bedroom condo can cost millions.

“We’re doing great business here, and have done since early 2009 when the market recovered,” says Peter Rollings, chief executive of real-estate agency Marsh and Parsons. “We’re now 40-50 percent  above our 2007 highs, driven by super demand from UK and overseas buyers.”

But while property agents are breaking out the champagne, it is becoming increasingly difficult for people on ordinary incomes to get into the market. One such person is Jacob Kennedy, a software engineer who works in London’s financial district.

“The prices always seem to go up just at the point when I think I might be able to afford it,” he says. “I always seem to be one or two steps behind the curve”.

Some experts claim hot money from abroad is distorting the market, and rich foreigners looking for a lucrative investment are pricing locals out of London. Daniel Bentley of the think tank Civitas says something needs to be done about it.

“I think we need to introduce new restrictions on foreign investors, and make sure that with each investment that is made, that money is creating new housing and not simply adding to the demand,” he says.

But others disagree. Peter Rollings believes London property has always been unaffordable for most people.

“It’s a city-state," he says. “Here, where we are in prime central London,  probably 40-45 percent of our buyers last year were from overseas. Now that doesn’t mean jetting in, buying a property, and jetting off again. It means they are living here and contributing to the local economy. So anyone who wants to get rid of them is in cloud cuckoo land, I think.”

Some analysts believe that the property market in this city is already heavily overvalued, that it's a bubble waiting to burst, and prices could one day plummet.

If that happens, it will certainly be welcomed by London's legions of would-be housebuyers. Right now, there’s little sign of it.

British home buyers fear a 'super bubble'

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:49

There’s an old saying that an Englishman's home is his castle.

If he lives in London, it's likely to be a pretty small castle, and there definitely won't be room for a moat -- unless he’s prepared to pay a king's ransom.

House prices in the British capital are rising at breakneck speed, fueling talk of a price bubble, or even a superbubble.

Prices rose 18 percent last year, according to a recent survey by the Nationwide Building Society. The average price of a home in the British capital is now more than $600,000.    In a desirable part of town, a simple two-bedroom condo can cost millions.

“We’re doing great business here, and have done since early 2009 when the market recovered,” says Peter Rollings, chief executive of real-estate agency Marsh and Parsons. “We’re now 40-50 percent  above our 2007 highs, driven by super demand from UK and overseas buyers.”

But while property agents are breaking out the champagne, it is becoming increasingly difficult for people on ordinary incomes to get into the market. One such person is Jacob Kennedy, a software engineer who works in London’s financial district.

“The prices always seem to go up just at the point when I think I might be able to afford it,” he says. “I always seem to be one or two steps behind the curve”.

Some experts claim hot money from abroad is distorting the market, and rich foreigners looking for a lucrative investment are pricing locals out of London. Daniel Bentley of the think tank Civitas says something needs to be done about it.

“I think we need to introduce new restrictions on foreign investors, and make sure that with each investment that is made, that money is creating new housing and not simply adding to the demand,” he says.

But others disagree. Peter Rollings believes London property has always been unaffordable for most people.

“It’s a city-state," he says. “Here, where we are in prime central London,  probably 40-45 percent of our buyers last year were from overseas. Now that doesn’t mean jetting in, buying a property, and jetting off again. It means they are living here and contributing to the local economy. So anyone who wants to get rid of them is in cloud cuckoo land, I think.”

Some analysts believe that the property market in this city is already heavily overvalued, that it's a bubble waiting to burst, and prices could one day plummet.

If that happens, it will certainly be welcomed by London's legions of would-be housebuyers. Right now, there’s little sign of it.

GOP Strategy To Run Against Health Law Hits Snags

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:46

Democrats in some states are hammering Republicans for their opposition to the health law's expansion of Medicaid.

» E-Mail This

Missing US woman found 10 years on

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:40
A California woman reported missing when she was 15 is found alive 10 years later, and her suspected captor is arrested.

Which cities will profit off the Star Wars museum?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:38

Chicago wants to lure director George Lucas to build his Lucas Cultural Arts Museum in the Windy City instead of San Francisco.

“We expect that the Lucas Cultural Arts Museum would generate between $2 and $2.5 billion in direct economic impact over ten years,” says Gillian Darlow, who co-chaired a task force to find a site for the museum in Chicago.

Attracting visitors is a pretty safe bet. Star Wars fans are devoted and they spend money. (A full storm-trooper costume can cost upwards of $1,200.)

But some conservationists and football fans aren’t crazy about the proposed site for the museum -- currently, it’s the Chicago Bears’ parking lot.

Dame Kiri attacks 'bullying' critics

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:34
Dame Kiri Te Kanawa speaks out in support of Glyndebourne singer Tara Erraught, after she was described as "stocky" and "dumpy" by critics.

Ukrainian Soldiers Killed In Attack By Separatists

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:34

Pro-Russian separatists attacked a military checkpoint in eastern Ukraine Thursday, killing at least 11 soldiers and wounding about 30. The country is preparing to hold national elections on Sunday.

» E-Mail This

Rise in EU immigration to the UK

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:32
There has been a rise in the arrival of EU citizens but overall net migration to the UK remained unchanged in the year to December 2013, official figures show.

No excuses if I don't perform - Rooney

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:30
Fully fit England forward Wayne Rooney says there will be no excuses if he does not perform at the World Cup in Brazil.

VIDEO: Blazing bus rolls towards fire engine

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:21
A fire crew in the US state of Minnesota by a blazing school bus after the bus started rolling towards it.

The economic backdrop to China's terrorist attacks

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:19

Chinese officials are calling it a terrorist attack. Early this morning in the western city of Urumqi, 31 people were killed and at least 90 others injured when vehicles plowed into a crowded market and then exploded. It’s the latest in a series of attacks in China. In March, a knife attack by a group of men killed dozens in Southwest China, and just a few weeks ago, a bombing and knife attack at a train station in Urumqi, injured dozens more. China’s government have blamed the previous attacks on Uighur separatists -- Uighurs are an ethnic Muslim minority who live in China’s vast Northwest region of Xinjiang, a Chinese province roughly the size of Alaska that borders Central Asia. China has so far not blamed any particular group for today’s attack.

#Xinjiang blast: Police cordoned off the scene after the explosion that has killed unknown number of people on May 22 pic.twitter.com/lZQRIAOC8C

— People's Daily,China (@PDChina) May 22, 2014

Today’s attack comes a week after the trial runs for a line that will connect Xinjiang with the rest of China by high-speed rail for the first time. In the past, Xinjiang was always considered very far away from the rest of China -- parts of it are closer to Baghdad than they are to Beijing and the people who live their have Caucasian facial features, many Uighurs don’t speak Chinese. But now a new train will reduce what was a trip that took days into hours, and that underscores China’s political control over this region, extending to economic control. Historically, Uighurs have always been businessmen -- this is the home to the ancient silk route. But these days, many Uighurs are frustrated because they feel they’ve lost a lot of economic decision-making power over their homeland to people they consider outsiders from Eastern China who now dominate government and business there.

Terrorist attack kills at least 31, injures 94 at Urumqi market http://t.co/f7G9RxXCQp

— China Xinhua News (@XHNews) May 22, 2014

 

The economic backdrop to China's terrorist attacks

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:19

Chinese officials are calling it a terrorist attack. Early this morning in the western city of Urumqi, 31 people were killed and at least 90 others injured when vehicles plowed into a crowded market and then exploded. It’s the latest in a series of attacks in China. In March, a knife attack by a group of men killed dozens in Southwest China, and just a few weeks ago, a bombing and knife attack at a train station in Urumqi, injured dozens more. China’s government have blamed the previous attacks on Uighur separatists -- Uighurs are an ethnic Muslim minority who live in China’s vast Northwest region of Xinjiang, a Chinese province roughly the size of Alaska that borders Central Asia. China has so far not blamed any particular group for today’s attack.

#Xinjiang blast: Police cordoned off the scene after the explosion that has killed unknown number of people on May 22 pic.twitter.com/lZQRIAOC8C

— People's Daily,China (@PDChina) May 22, 2014

Today’s attack comes a week after the trial runs for a line that will connect Xinjiang with the rest of China by high-speed rail for the first time. In the past, Xinjiang was always considered very far away from the rest of China -- parts of it are closer to Baghdad than they are to Beijing and the people who live their have Caucasian facial features, many Uighurs don’t speak Chinese. But now a new train will reduce what was a trip that took days into hours, and that underscores China’s political control over this region, extending to economic control. Historically, Uighurs have always been businessmen -- this is the home to the ancient silk route. But these days, many Uighurs are frustrated because they feel they’ve lost a lot of economic decision-making power over their homeland to people they consider outsiders from Eastern China who now dominate government and business there.

Terrorist attack kills at least 31, injures 94 at Urumqi market http://t.co/f7G9RxXCQp

— China Xinhua News (@XHNews) May 22, 2014

 

VIDEO: 'This is quite possibly start of coup'

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:17
The BBC's Jonah Fisher reporting in Bangkok on talks aimed at resolving Thailand's political crisis, describes the scene as it becomes apparent a coup was imminent.

Day in pictures: 22 May 2014

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 04:07
News photos from past 24 hours: 22 May
ON THE AIR

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4