National / International News

Weekly Wrap:

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:57

Joining Adriene to talk about the week's business and economic news are Linette Lopez of Business Insider and the Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy. The big topics this week: Greece nears default, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen releases a message this week about the possibility of a rate hike and Pope Francis criticizes consumerism. 

 

Socially anxious? Try some kimchi

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:56

I'm delivering this to you — I'll admit it — with some amount of skepticism.

But it's kind of amazing.

And it's about pickles — one of the world's great foods.

Researchers at William & Mary and the University of Maryland say they've discovered a connection between eating fermented foods, such as pickles and kimchi, and feeling less anxious.

Just think, loading up on sauerkraut could help you ace that job interview. (Maybe.)  

Researchers still need to run experiments to see if they can prove any actual causation. 

Independent record labels push back against Apple

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:54

Taylor Swift’s smash album "1989" will not be available on Apple’s new music streaming service when it launches on June 30.

Swift has pulled the album from both Apple Music and Spotify over concerns the streaming services do not provide fair compensation for artists.

Now, independent artists and record labels are crying foul, too — upset over Apple’s contract stipulation of not paying artists’ royalties during the initial three-month roll out. Apple plans to charge customers $9.99 a month for the streaming service.

The Beggars Group is the parent company of indie labels such as Matador and 4AD, as well as popular artists such as Alabama Shakes, Adele and Radiohead. The company put up a blog post outlining its disagreement with Apple.

Still, Apple is a company that is very close to the hearts, and wallets, of many musicians, many of whom use Apple technology to produce their product, while also making a decent living selling music in its iTunes store.

But is all of that enough to convince independent artists to give away their music for free on Apple’s new streaming service?

“Maybe,” says Jim DeRogatis, co-host of Sound Opinions on Chicago Public Radio. 

“The models are changing so quickly, I don't know of any label, independent or major, that really has a clear idea of what Apple Radio, Apple Music or Beats Music is going to end up being,” DeRogatis says.

He notes that independent labels are right to be wary of any business model that devalues their product, but saying no to a company with the clout and reach of Apple is not an easy call.

“You know, many artists say, 'It's better to have people listening to my music, even if I'm not making any money, than not listening.' ”

But others say the fact that Apple spent months and months hammering out special arrangements with major labels, only to give independents a “take it or leave it” offer, just isn’t fair.

Jesse Von Doom is the CEO of Cash Music, a nonprofit tech startup that provides business tools for musicians.

“You're talking about a significant portion of the market that is dealt with as an afterthought, and that happened again with Apple,” Von Doom says.

“They're coming to people saying, 'Look, we're going to do this streaming product, we're the biggest company in the world, we have more money than God, and we're going to ask you to take the financial hit while we onboard customers.’"

Von Doom worries that Apple’s move into streaming and away from retail risks killing a really important source of income for musicians.

"I think it feels to a lot of artists like Apple is trying to make music just another feature of a phone." 

Indpedendent record labels push back against Apple

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:54

Taylor Swift’s smash album "1989" will not be available on Apple’s new music streaming service when it launches on June 30.

Swift has pulled the album from both Apple Music and Spotify over concerns the streaming services do not provide fair compensation for artists.

Now, independent artists and record labels are crying foul, too — upset over Apple’s contract stipulation of not paying artists’ royalties during the initial three-month roll out. Apple plans to charge customers $9.99 a month for the streaming service.

The Beggars Group is the parent company of indie labels such as Matador and 4AD, as well as popular artists such as Alabama Shakes, Adele and Radiohead. The company put up a blog post outlining its disagreement with Apple.

Still, Apple is a company that is very close to the hearts, and wallets, of many musicians, many of whom use Apple technology to produce their product, while also making a decent living selling music in its iTunes store.

But is all of that enough to convince independent artists to give away their music for free on Apple’s new streaming service?

“Maybe,” says Jim DeRogatis, co-host of Sound Opinions on Chicago Public Radio. 

“The models are changing so quickly, I don't know of any label, independent or major, that really has a clear idea of what Apple Radio, Apple Music or Beats Music is going to end up being,” DeRogatis says.

He notes that independent labels are right to be wary of any business model that devalues their product, but saying no to a company with the clout and reach of Apple is not an easy call.

“You know, many artists say, 'It's better to have people listening to my music, even if I'm not making any money, than not listening.' ”

But others say the fact that Apple spent months and months hammering out special arrangements with major labels, only to give independents a “take it or leave it” offer, just isn’t fair.

Jesse Von Doom is the CEO of Cash Music, a nonprofit tech startup that provides business tools for musicians.

“You're talking about a significant portion of the market that is dealt with as an afterthought, and that happened again with Apple,” Von Doom says.

“They're coming to people saying, 'Look, we're going to do this streaming product, we're the biggest company in the world, we have more money than God, and we're going to ask you to take the financial hit while we onboard customers.’"

Von Doom worries that Apple’s move into streaming and away from retail risks killing a really important source of income for musicians.

"I think it feels to a lot of artists like Apple is trying to make music just another feature of a phone." 

Detroit's Iconic Fisher Building Up For Auction

NPR News - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:53

An important part of Detroit's skyline is on the auction block — the 29-story Fisher Building. The bank foreclosed on it, and next week, it goes up for sale online.

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Stopping SAS march 'not an option'

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:50
A fatal SAS reservist training exercise would have been "significantly inhibited" if safety guidelines had been followed, an inquest hears.

Big rise in terror attacks, US says

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:48
The US State Department says the number of terror attacks around the world rose by a third in 2014 compared with the previous year.

Greece: What tourists need to know

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:42
What you need to know if you're going on holiday to Greece

The man who farms tables and chairs

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:42
The man who grows tables and chairs

VIDEO: The man who grows trees into chairs

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:36
A designer in Derbyshire says he has found a new and dramatically more efficient way of making furniture.

The Rise of Women Gamers at E3 2015

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:34

E3 — video games, gamers and traditionally lots and lots of men. But there are signs that the total male domination is changing.

Produced by Preditorial | www.preditorial.tv
Director of Photography and Editor: Anton Seim
Reporter: Adriene Hill

"Windfall" TheFatRat, Released on Tasty Records
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

After Verses Turn To Versus, Poet Emerges With Renowned Oxford Post

NPR News - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:33

If you didn't know better, you might mistake the hubbub for American politics. But, amid the fickle endorsements and dustups, poet Simon Armitage won election as the newest Oxford professor of poetry.

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The Neighs Have It: Horse Outruns Man, But Just Barely

NPR News - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:31

The annual Man v. Horse Marathon in Wales sounds like a lopsided contest favoring racers with four feet. But scientists say that Homo sapiens evolved to be incredible endurance athletes, too.

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Farah attention depressing - Philip

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:30
GB sprinter Asha Philip says the recent attention on double Olympic champion Mo Farah has heaped negativity on the sport.

There's a new festival circuit for diehard TV fans

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:24

It's been said we’re in a second golden age of television. There’s more content on more platforms than ever before, but the sheer volume of TV shows can make it hard for new programs to stand out. Enter the television fest. It’s like a film festival but for episodic content. Elizabeth Wagmeister writes for Variety, and she recently covered the TV festival circuit in a piece called "Why Television Is Hitting the Road for Festivals." 

On why TV shows are turning to festivals: 

 Festivals make sense for television because the TV industry is booming … festivals are a great place for new shows and returning shows to get exposure. The best fans for TV are the ones that are going to these festivals…. When they’re there, they’re going to go on Facebook. They’re going to go on Instagram, and then the buzz spreads. 

On how TV festivals operate: 

Some of them will have different screenings at a time, so you have to choose. A big example of that is Comi-Con, which of course is film and TV, but there’s so many fans that want to go that every room is jam packed. Other ones, they’ll just have one screening at a time and it depends on how mature these festivals are. 

Kansas City Royals Are Running The Bases In All-Star Game Balloting

NPR News - Fri, 2015-06-19 12:07

Major League Baseball has invalidated millions of online ballots for next month's game. Officials say ballots are invalidated every year, but the Royals' strong showing this year has raised eyebrows.

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Blatter backs integrity checks

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 11:58
Fifa president Sepp Blatter backs a proposal for the organisation's top officials to pass integrity checks.

Tour owner could quit UCI calendar

BBC - Fri, 2015-06-19 11:23
Tour organiser Amaury Sport Organisation may pull its races from the 2016 UCI international calendar, it has been claimed.

#NPRreads: Wealthier Grays And The Intersection Of Race And Guns

NPR News - Fri, 2015-06-19 11:21

This week's selection of articles and essays covers a surprising economic fact about seniors, the psychological damage done to juveniles in solitary and a look at the South Carolina church shooting.

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$1 Million Bond For Church Shooting Suspect

NPR News - Fri, 2015-06-19 11:10

Dylann Roof appeared via videolink for a court hearing today, where he stood expressionless as victims' family members poured out their emotions.

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