National / International News

Pulitzer-winning poet Kinnell dies

BBC - 7 hours 5 min ago
Pulitzer Prize-winning US poet Galway Kinnell, best known for his spiritual poems connecting the experiences of daily life to larger forces, dies aged 87.

Tunisia's Secularists Victorious In Parliamentary Vote

NPR News - 7 hours 7 min ago

The Nidda Tounes (Tunisia Calls) party won just under 40 percent of the seats, beating out the ruling Islamist Ennahda party.

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Prison for S Korea bullying soldiers

BBC - 7 hours 9 min ago
A military court in South Korea gives prison sentences ranging from 25 to 45 years to four soldiers involved in the death of a junior soldier.

Tunisia secularists win elections

BBC - 7 hours 13 min ago
Tunisia's secularist Nidaa Tounes party wins 81 seats in parliament, pushing the Islamists of Ennahda into second place, official results show.

VIDEO: Lava flow creeps toward Hawaii homes

BBC - 7 hours 16 min ago
Molten lava from a volcano erupting on Hawaii's Big Island has been flowing slowly across the island.

PODCAST: Bring your own device

First, economic growth in America. GDP was quite solid as the summer wore on. More on that. And one of the most influential business tycoons in the world has come out publicly as gay: Tim Cook, the CEO of Apple. We spoke with actor and social justice advocate George Takei about the importance of Cook's Op-ed. Plus, passengers increasingly bring their own entertainment with them aboard flights...on their mobile devices. Now, airlines are responding, possibly with a policy of BYOD: bring your own device.

What midterm election results could mean for budgets

In five days, the polls will be open. And with gains for Republicans predicted but not assured, we turn to a person who tracks the future of the federal budget like a gearhead follows cars. 

Stan Collender contributes to Forbes, and once upon a time was a staffer for both the House and Senate Budget Committees. He joined host David Brancaccio to discuss what a Republican majority would mean for budget cuts in Washington.

Click the media player above to hear Stan Collender in conversation with Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio.

VIDEO: 'Why I needed Danish sperm donor'

BBC - 7 hours 30 min ago
A single mother with one-year-old twins explains to BBC Breakfast how she needed a Danish sperm donor and how she plans to tell the girls about their conception.

Quiz: Bonuses not quick to bounce back

Signing bonuses for new college grads nearly disappeared after the recession but are slowly becoming more common, according to a Michigan State University survey of employers.

What percentage of employers offer signing bonuses to new college graduates?

Hopes to reopen landslip-hit A83

BBC - 7 hours 48 min ago
Contractors hope to clear the remaining debris from a 2,000 tonne landslip on the A83 and reopen the road at the Rest and Be Thankful in Argyll.

New face of Cardiff centre revealed

BBC - 7 hours 51 min ago
Images showing the new face of Cardiff city centre are revealed showing how it will look following a massive development project.

Barclays sets aside £500m in probe

BBC - 8 hours 12 min ago
Barclays reports profits of £3.72bn for the first nine months of the year as it sets aside £500m relating to "investigations" into foreign exchange trading.

VIDEO: European Scrutiny Committee

BBC - 8 hours 13 min ago
The committee questions the UK Commissioner-designate Lord Hill

VIDEO: Becoming a mother at 70 in India

BBC - 8 hours 15 min ago
The BBC's Divya Arya reports from India, where women of 60 and 70 are becoming mothers for the first time.

In-flight entertainment's future may be on your tablet

Airlines have noticed that people increasingly bring their own entertainment with them onboard, on their mobile devices. That means the nature of in-flight entertainment is changing, too.

In fact, the future of in-flight entertainment could be BYOD: bring your own device.

Airline consultant Jay Sorensen sees a lot of people doing that already.  

“Before they get on the airplane, they’re gonna load up their device,” says Sorensen, president of IdeaWorks Company. “They’ll get caught up on all the past episodes of House of Cards onboard the airplane.”

That’s why airlines like Delta and United have invested in systems that stream in-flight entertainment straight to your mobile device. They see economy class passengers bypassing their seat-back screens. And they’re not alone.

Doing away with seat-back screens altogether would be lighter and cheaper for airlines, which Henry Harteveldt of Atmosphere Research Group says already pay a lot for content.

“The movies and TV shows and music that we watch and listen to aren’t provided free,” he says. “Airlines license that. And it can cost them several millions of dollars a year, per airline.”

If all this TV-watching threatens to drain your battery, don’t worry. Harteveldt says airlines are also installing more plugs. 

The high cost of principal turnover

Heather Wolpert-Gawron has been teaching for eleven years at Jefferson Middle School in San Gabriel, Calif. During that time, she says, the school has had about ten principals.

“We had many years where the morale was low,” she says. “We just kind of felt abandoned.”

Some of those principals left on their own. Some were removed. According to a new report from the nonprofit School Leaders Network, half of new principals quit in their third year on the job.

The group, which provides training and support to principals, says the job has become too complex and isolating. Principals put in long hours overseeing teachers, meeting with parents and implementing one reform after another.

“It’s very demanding and you’re being pulled in different directions, so it really makes it difficult for you to focus on being an instructional leader,” says Connie Rodriguez, who left her position as a junior high school principal in San Antonio, Texas, after three years.

It costs about $75,000 to recruit and train each replacement, says Mariah Cone, vice president of knowledge with the School Leaders Network. The cost to student achievement is higher, she says, with studies showing that both math and English test scores drop when a principal leaves.

“It takes up to three to five years for the next principal to really be able to show gains,” Cone says.

If the next principal lasts that long. Cone says ongoing mentoring and training might help more of them stay longer.

 

@College Let me in! #prettyplease

It's college-tour season, and everyone is a reviewer on Twitter:

As much as I liked UIC, I probably had the worst and least informed tour guide imaginable. #Please #Learnyourschool #AndEtiquette

— Hayden T. Balduf (@HBalduf) October 15, 2014

Just witnessed the worst guided tour of Messiah College, all that was said in a few minute time span was "that is our green house"

— William Wical (@willwical) October 13, 2014

k so my college tour guide for UCSB was kind of like....the biggest babe ever to exist pic.twitter.com/quXGFrmxbR

— abbey (@AbbeyxBlanford) June 24, 2014

Be it bad or babealicious, college admissions officers are paying attention to all that sharing.

"Institutions of higher education are most definitely reviewing that to find out how they are being evaluated," says Jeff Fuller, director of student recruitment for the University of Houston and President of the National Association for College Admission Counseling

Fuller says if a kid has a bad experience on campus, an engaged admissions officer can respond fast; before a nasty tweet dings a school’s reputation.

"More and more colleges are hiring folks to manage their social media to make sure they remain current in what’s being discussed," Fuller says.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s admissions office has a small army working on social media.

"We have two blogs, we have multiple Facebook accounts, we have a Twitter account, we have an Instagram account," says Ashley Memory, an assistant director of admissions. 

There are three admissions officers and as many as four paid interns managing and creating content for those accounts.  

Memory says there is a little risk involved in having all these open forums—There will always be disappointed applicants.

More often than not, she says, negative comments are neutralized by the broader community of current UNC students or alumni.  

The main job of college admissions officers on social media is to communicate with potential students. First, they try to convince them to apply to their school. Then, if they are accepted, they convince them to attend.

Part of that job involves answering a lot of basic questions.

"Before they may have just picked up the phone and called our office, or may have sent our office an email, or they may have sought out the answer for themselves online," says Gabe Santi, from the admission office at Michigan State University. "Now, they may just post the question on Facebook or tweet at us." 

Can Michigan State tell me if I got accepted or not already #impatient

— sophia. (@samm_jamm) October 20, 2014

@samm_jamm Thanks for your patience!

— MSU Admissions (@msu_admissions) October 20, 2014

VIDEO: No hugs for Ebola volunteers

BBC - 8 hours 44 min ago
The United Nations is appealing for thousands of healthcare workers to volunteer to help in the countries worst affected by Ebola.

NHS finding it 'difficult to cope'

BBC - 8 hours 51 min ago
The NHS in Scotland is finding it "increasingly difficult to cope", according to the public spending watchdog.

Man arrested over McConville murder

BBC - 9 hours 1 sec ago
Police arrest a 73-year-old man in Dunmurry, on the outskirts of Belfast, in connection with the murder of Jean McConville.
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