National / International News

Lone Passenger Pigeon Escapes Pie Pan, Lands In Smithsonian

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:25

Passenger pigeons used to be the most abundant bird in North America. But hunters drove them to extinction, and by 1914, only one was left. A century later, that pigeon, named Martha, is on exhibit.

» E-Mail This

Wave Of Guatemalan Migrant Children Presents Unique Challenges

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:23

Many indigenous Guatemalan children entering the U.S. alone speak little or no Spanish. This language barrier contributes to the complexity of the unfolding humanitarian crisis at the border.

» E-Mail This

For Iraqi Christians, Return To Captured City Is A Fraught Mandate

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:07

Archbishop Emil Nona, the head of the Chaldean church in Mosul, Iraq, was out of town when ISIS captured his city. Now, he is going back to Mosul, as are some 50 Christian families. He knows the dangers, but he says he must tend his flock.

» E-Mail This

Insurgents Draw Westerners To Battle In Iraq And Syria

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:07

Thousands of foreign fighters are joining the fighting in Iraq and Syria. According to U.S. intelligence officials, the flow of foreign fighters includes a hefty contingent from the West. Why are so many Westerners are going, and will they bring the violence they learned abroad back home?

» E-Mail This

Ukraine's Latest Turn Toward EU Has Moscow Glowering

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:07

Ukraine's president has signed a historic trade and economic pact with the European Union, a move his predecessor rejected. The conflict that the first rejection sparked still simmers, with violence continuing in the country's east despite a shaky cease-fire.

» E-Mail This

Hot dog, it's a holiday week

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:07

From the Marketplace Datebook here's an extended look at events coming up the week of June 30:

What's happening in the housing market? On Monday the National Association of Realtors issues its monthly pending home sales index for May.

It's a holiday week for Congress leading up to Independence Day.

The National Organization for Women was established on June 30, 1966.

And remember Scarlett O'Hara's famous line? "After all...tomorrow is another day." We at Datebook headquarters love that sentiment. Margaret Mitchell's novel "Gone with the Wind" was published on June 30, 1936 according to history.com. It won the Pulitzer Prize the following year.

On Tuesday, the Commerce Department reports on construction spending for May.

Wanna take a ride? Wednesday is World UFO Day. Maybe you'll get lucky.

On Thursday the Labor Department releases its June jobs report.

And crank the A/C. We enter the dog days of summer.

U.S. markets are closed on Friday for Independence Day.

Exercising your independence with trip? You have some solid company. According to AAA 41 million Americans are rocketing out of town for the holiday.

And finally, July is National Hot Dog Month. According to the National Hot Dog & Sausage Council, Los Angeles beats all other cities for hot dog consumption. I am filled with pride.

Hot dog, it's a holiday week

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:07

From the Marketplace Datebook here's an extended look at events coming up the week of June 30:

What's happening in the housing market? On Monday the National Association of Realtors issues its monthly pending home sales index for May.

It's a holiday week for Congress leading up to Independence Day.

The National Organization for Women was established on June 30, 1966.

And remember Scarlett O'Hara's famous line? "After all...tomorrow is another day." We at Datebook headquarters love that sentiment. Margaret Mitchell's novel "Gone with the Wind" was published on June 30, 1936 according to history.com. It won the Pulitzer Prize the following year.

On Tuesday, the Commerce Department reports on construction spending for May.

Wanna take a ride? Wednesday is World UFO Day. Maybe you'll get lucky.

On Thursday the Labor Department releases its June jobs report.

And crank the A/C. We enter the dog days of summer.

U.S. markets are closed on Friday for Independence Day.

Exercising your independence with trip? You have some solid company. According to AAA 41 million Americans are rocketing out of town for the holiday.

And finally, July is National Hot Dog Month. According to the National Hot Dog & Sausage Council, Los Angeles beats all other cities for hot dog consumption. I am filled with pride.

Bathrobes And Baby Carriers: The Stuff Of Manliness?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:07

For All Things Considered's series on men in America, NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji asked some guys about the objects that make them feel manly. We want to hear from you, too.

» E-Mail This

VIDEO: Banksy removal 'could break law'

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 12:01
Confusion surrounds the future of a Banksy artwork in Cheltenham as a council warns removing the work may break the law.

The Shifting Legacy Of The Man Who Shot Franz Ferdinand

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:52

Gavrilo Princip helped spark World War I when he assassinated the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne a hundred years ago. In death, he's been a more potent symbol than he ever was in life.

» E-Mail This

Thousands flee floods in Paraguay

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:41
Torrential rains force the evacuation of more than 200,000 people living near the Paraguay and Parana rivers in Paraguay.

Glastonbury power back after lightning

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:28
Power is restored to the stages at Glastonbury after an electrical storm caused the festival to be shut down temporarily on safety grounds.

Space tourism: Still for the future, New Mexico learns

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:27

Money's everywhere. And then sometimes… suddenly… it's not.

Down in the Southern New Mexico desert four years ago, there was a kind of birthday.

Richard Branson, the billionaire behind Virgin Records, Virgin Mobile, Virgin Atlantic, christened Virgin Galactic and promised tourists a two and a half hour flight to space for $250,000 per trip.

The operation set up shop outside Las Cruces at a place called Spaceport America.

Josh Wheeler wrote about it for Buzzfeed. "It rises up in the middle of the desert, almost from ground level, on the south side, then opens up with this giant three story glass wall with this giant runway, coming out of it on the other side. It's really sort of a beautiful building to find out in the middle of the desert."

Fred Martino, Director of Content at the public radio station KRWG in Las Cruces,  lives near the facility.

"When people heard about this idea, they really were excited about it. And not just from an economic development standpoint," Martino says. "The idea that they would live in the place where space travel would be possible, that was really an exciting idea. So was what the Spaceport could bring with it, in a state where 30 percent of children live in poverty. New Mexico would front the money for the Spaceport. And Virgin would pay rent, and bring big spending space tourists, money and jobs. Plus, a chance to be a part of something kind of magical."

Except, it hasn't happened yet. There have been no Virgin Galactic space flights in 2012. Or 2013. There were construction delays. Haggles with regulators. Insurance problems. Political fights .

"There was some concern at one point about Virgin Galactic's future in New Mexico," Martino says. "And it had to do with the legislation that was being proposed at the state level to give liability protection for the folks who do the launches, build the equipment for the spaceport. And the Spaceport came with a big price tag. More than $200 million… money from the state, the local counties, and their taxpayers. For now, the action at the Spaceport is mostly from Elon Musk's company Space X. And NASA."

Josh Wheeler rode the one bus on the one road that drives to it. "The couple times I visited nothing was happening out there."

Virgin Galactic has said it will stay at Spaceport America. But state officials are no longer counting on those space tourists to make the money back. "They were no longer going to get the economic development that comes from the being cradle of a nascent industry, they had to rely on the promise of a tourist boom," Wheeler says.

For now, those are the people New Mexico is relying on to recoup its money: what they call "terrestrial space tourists," who will ride a bus out to the desert to see the Spaceport, and never get off the ground.

"It's very ironic, that on the one hand you have people that can afford a $250,000 ticket going up into sub-orbital space, and getting those amazing views. And on the other hand, you'll have people that can't afford those tickets, who are expected to just come and watch those people who do have that money, go and have this potentially life changing experience," Wheeler says.

What happens next here? What Virgin Galactic does next will dictate that. Richard Branson told Fusion that he's "90 percent certain" they will launch this year.

We reached out to both Virgin Galactic and Spaceport America, but as of now, we haven't heard back.

Space tourism: Still for the future, New Mexico learns

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:27

Money's everywhere. And then sometimes… suddenly… it's not.

Down in the Southern New Mexico desert four years ago, there was a kind of birthday.

Richard Branson, the billionaire behind Virgin Records, Virgin Mobile, Virgin Atlantic, christened Virgin Galactic and promised tourists a two and a half hour flight to space for $250,000 per trip.

The operation set up shop outside Las Cruces at a place called Spaceport America.

Josh Wheeler wrote about it for Buzzfeed. "It rises up in the middle of the desert, almost from ground level, on the south side, then opens up with this giant three story glass wall with this giant runway, coming out of it on the other side. It's really sort of a beautiful building to find out in the middle of the desert."

Fred Martino, Director of Content at the public radio station KRWG in Las Cruces,  lives near the facility.

"When people heard about this idea, they really were excited about it. And not just from an economic development standpoint," Martino says. "The idea that they would live in the place where space travel would be possible, that was really an exciting idea. So was what the Spaceport could bring with it, in a state where 30 percent of children live in poverty. New Mexico would front the money for the Spaceport. And Virgin would pay rent, and bring big spending space tourists, money and jobs. Plus, a chance to be a part of something kind of magical."

Except, it hasn't happened yet. There have been no Virgin Galactic space flights in 2012. Or 2013. There were construction delays. Haggles with regulators. Insurance problems. Political fights .

"There was some concern at one point about Virgin Galactic's future in New Mexico," Martino says. "And it had to do with the legislation that was being proposed at the state level to give liability protection for the folks who do the launches, build the equipment for the spaceport. And the Spaceport came with a big price tag. More than $200 million… money from the state, the local counties, and their taxpayers. For now, the action at the Spaceport is mostly from Elon Musk's company Space X. And NASA."

Josh Wheeler rode the one bus on the one road that drives to it. "The couple times I visited nothing was happening out there."

Virgin Galactic has said it will stay at Spaceport America. But state officials are no longer counting on those space tourists to make the money back. "They were no longer going to get the economic development that comes from the being cradle of a nascent industry, they had to rely on the promise of a tourist boom," Wheeler says.

For now, those are the people New Mexico is relying on to recoup its money: what they call "terrestrial space tourists," who will ride a bus out to the desert to see the Spaceport, and never get off the ground.

"It's very ironic, that on the one hand you have people that can afford a $250,000 ticket going up into sub-orbital space, and getting those amazing views. And on the other hand, you'll have people that can't afford those tickets, who are expected to just come and watch those people who do have that money, go and have this potentially life changing experience," Wheeler says.

What happens next here? What Virgin Galactic does next will dictate that. Richard Branson told Fusion that he's "90 percent certain" they will launch this year.

We reached out to both Virgin Galactic and Spaceport America, but as of now, we haven't heard back.

Tech IRL: A second life for pay phones

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:21

Ever walk down the street and see a phone booth? Do you even notice it anymore?

There are some city planners and internet companies out there that do.

Cities in the United States and around the world are working on turning those neglected telephones into wi-fi hotspots. Among them: New York City.

Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson joins Weekend host Lizzie O’Leary to explore tech in real life.

Tech IRL: A second life for pay phones

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:21

Ever walk down the street and see a phone booth? Do you even notice it anymore?

There are some city planners and internet companies out there that do.

Cities in the United States and around the world are working on turning those neglected telephones into wi-fi hotspots. Among them: New York City.

Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson joins Weekend host Lizzie O’Leary to explore tech in real life.

Armed police hunt for 'man with gun'

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:14
Dozens of police officers are involved in an armed manhunt in Cornwall for a man who they fear might be carrying a gun.

Superb Murray races into round four

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:13
Andy Murray beats Spanish 27th seed Roberto Bautista Agut in straight sets to reach the fourth round at Wimbledon

VIDEO: Fourteen killed in gas pipeline blast

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:09
At least 14 people have died after a state owned gas pipeline exploded in the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh.

Federal Panel Backs FluMist For Kids, But The Shot Isn't Dead Yet

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 11:07

The live vaccine nose spray protects children better, a federal panel says, but pediatricians aren't sold. They say it's too risky for the many children with asthma or compromised immunity.

» E-Mail This

ON THE AIR

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4