National / International News

VIDEO: West Africa on Ebola high alert

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:03
Sierra Leone has become the latest country to be put on alert over a potential outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus.

In Ranchers Vs. Weeds, Climate Change Gives Weeds An Edge

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:03

Invasive weeds are already a big headache for ranchers, who spend thousands of dollars to get rid of them. New research shows that a changing climate is likely to help many of these weeds thrive.

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'Sous Chef' Reveals The High-Adrenaline Dance Behind Your Dinner

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

In his new memoir, sous chef Michael Gibney spends 24 hours on the line, capturing the rhythm of a New York restaurant kitchen — from quiet morning prep work to dinner hour in full swing.

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At Nuclear Summit, Ukraine Questions Dominate The Day

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

President Obama is holding a series of bilateral meetings with world leaders in The Hague. Although the event is focused on nuclear disarmament, international attention is dominated by events in Ukraine.

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Facing Ebola Outbreak, Officials Must Contain Both Virus And Panic

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

Health workers in the West African nation of Guinea are working to control an outbreak of the Ebola virus. The disease has sickened 86 people and killed 59, according to the World Health Organization.

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Justices Divide By Gender In Hobby Lobby Contraception Case

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

The company, citing religion, argued before the Supreme Court that it shouldn't have to provide contraception coverage in its health plan. The coverage is mandated by the Affordable Care Act.

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After Oil Spill, Ships Start Moving — But Cleanup Has Just Begun

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

After a vast oil spill in the waters off Houston, authorities are reopening the shipping channel, hoping to ease the wait on those using it. Dave Fehling of Houston Public Media explains the cleanup.

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For Advocates And Telephone Companies, NSA Changes Are Welcome News

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

A House committee and the White House are proposing to move the NSA's phone records program to the hands of phone companies. Privacy advocates and phone companies both support these proposals.

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Out Of White House And Congress, Two Proposals To Change NSA Practices

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

House Republicans are proposing a limit on the National Security Agency's phone records program. President Obama also repeated support for having phone companies keep the records, rather than the NSA.

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VIDEO: China families vent missing plane fury

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:48
Angry relatives of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines plane have clashed with police outside Malaysia's embassy in the Chinese capital, Beijing.

Tuberculosis Roars Back With A Deadly Edge

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:44

PBS's Frontline travels to the epicenter of a rising epidemic: drug-resistant tuberculosis that's costly and tough to treat. Join us for a live Twitter chat tonight during the film's premiere.

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VIDEO: Ceiling collapse theatre set to reopen

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:36
The Apollo theatre in London's West End is ready to reopen, three months after its roof collapsed during a performance, injuring 76 people.

With Ribbons, Russians Show Support For Takeover In Crimea

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:33

Politicians have adopted the orange and black ribbons in a symbolic move that was first introduced by Catherine the Great in the 18th century.

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Met chief orders ban on shredding

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:29
The head of the Metropolitan Police asks "that there is no more shredding" of documents while he deals with claims that files relating to a corruption review were destroyed.

Obama: Pray for US mudslide victims

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:27
President Barack Obama urges Americans to pray for victims of the Washington state mudslide as officials predict the death toll of 14 will rise.

Oil and gas will drive future control of the South China Sea

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13

The global geopolitical conversation this week is focused on Europe and Ukraine and what the G7 is going do about Russia.

However, eventually and probably sooner rather than later, the conversation is going to turn back to Asia. President Obama's got a trip scheduled to the region next month, and somewhere in his conversations with leaders there the South China Sea is going to come up; who gets to control it and who gets the oil and natural gas reserves that are under the ocean floor.

In his new book “Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and The End of a Stable Pacific”, Robert Kaplan breaks down how a possible dispute over the South China Sea could have a substantial impact.

Kaplan notes that the South China Sea is said to have oil reserves of seven billion barrels and over 900 cubic feet of natural gas. This makes it very attractive to countries in the region. Kaplan said the biggest competitor for control of the South China Sea is China. 

“The Chinese themselves claim what’s called the nine dash line or the whole heart of the sea itself” said Kaplan. “China sees the South China Sea, the way the United States saw the Caribbean in the 19th and early 20th century; as the blue water extension of its continental landmass that it must dominate”.

Kaplan said the possible dispute over who owns the South China Sea could have a staunching economic impact.

“If the pacific is no longer stable, that will affect investment, growth rates, etc.” said Kaplan. “If you ask me what’s the biggest question in the world today; it’s not ‘Will Iran get its Nukes?’ it’s the direction of the Chinese economy.”

China claims that the South China Sea will produce 130 million barrels of oil.  Kaplan said that if this calculation is correct, the South China Sea is only second to Saudi Arabia in terms of how much oil it has.

Oil and gas will drive future control of the South China Sea

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13

The global geopolitical conversation this week is focused on Europe and Ukraine and what the G7 is going do about Russia.

However, eventually and probably sooner rather than later, the conversation is going to turn back to Asia. President Obama's got a trip scheduled to the region next month, and somewhere in his conversations with leaders there the South China Sea is going to come up; who gets to control it and who gets the oil and natural gas reserves that are under the ocean floor.

In his new book “Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and The End of a Stable Pacific”, Robert Kaplan breaks down how a possible dispute over the South China Sea could have a substantial impact.

Kaplan notes that the South China Sea is said to have oil reserves of seven billion barrels and over 900 cubic feet of natural gas. This makes it very attractive to countries in the region. Kaplan said the biggest competitor for control of the South China Sea is China. 

“The Chinese themselves claim what’s called the nine dash line or the whole heart of the sea itself” said Kaplan. “China sees the South China Sea, the way the United States saw the Caribbean in the 19th and early 20th century; as the blue water extension of its continental landmass that it must dominate”.

Kaplan said the possible dispute over who owns the South China Sea could have a staunching economic impact.

“If the pacific is no longer stable, that will affect investment, growth rates, etc.” said Kaplan. “If you ask me what’s the biggest question in the world today; it’s not ‘Will Iran get its Nukes?’ it’s the direction of the Chinese economy.”

China claims that the South China Sea will produce 130 million barrels of oil.  Kaplan said that if this calculation is correct, the South China Sea is only second to Saudi Arabia in terms of how much oil it has.

Oil and gas will drive disputes on future control of the South China Sea

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13

The global geopolitical conversation this week is focused on Europe and Ukraine and what the G7 is going do about Russia.

However, eventually and probably sooner rather than later, the conversation is going to turn back to Asia. President Obama's got a trip scheduled to the region next month, and somewhere in his conversations with leaders there the South China Sea is going to come up; who gets to control it and who gets the oil and natural gas reserves that are under the ocean floor.

In his new book “Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and The End of a Stable Pacific”, Robert Kaplan breaks down how a possible dispute over the South China Sea could have a substantial impact.

Kaplan notes that the South China Sea is said to have oil reserves of seven billion barrels and over 900 cubic feet of natural gas. This makes it very attractive to countries in the region. Kaplan said the biggest competitor for control of the South China Sea is China. 

“The Chinese themselves claim what’s called the nine dash line or the whole heart of the sea itself” said Kaplan. “China sees the South China Sea, the way the United States saw the Caribbean in the 19th and early 20th century; as the blue water extension of its continental landmass that it must dominate”.

Kaplan said the possible dispute over who owns the South China Sea could have a staunching economic impact.

“If the pacific is no longer stable, that will affect investment, growth rates, etc.” said Kaplan. “If you ask me what’s the biggest question in the world today; it’s not ‘Will Iran get its Nukes?’ it’s the direction of the Chinese economy.”

China claims that the South China Sea will produce 130 million barrels of oil.  Kaplan said that if this calculation is correct, the South China Sea is only second to Saudi Arabia in terms of how much oil it has.

Treasury to sell more Lloyds shares

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13
The government announces plans to return more of Lloyds Banking Group to the private sector, with the sale of a 7.5% stake to investors.

Holder Ding beaten in first round

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:08
Ding Junhui is beaten by Ben Woollaston in the first round of the Players' Championship Grand Final in Preston.

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