National / International News

Video cameras spread to more workplaces

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-29 02:00

Police departments all over the country are ordering body-cams and dash-cams for their patrol officers these days as they face pressure to monitor how officers treat civilians.

Those tiny video cameras, meanwhile, are spreading into a lot of workplaces that have nothing to do with police officers and guns.

“Hospitals, retail, we’re seeing them in manufacturing, we’re seeing them in every industry,” says Kate Bronfenbrenner, director of Labor Education Research at Cornell University's School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

The cameras are getting better with technological advances, and they're getting cheaper as more suppliers enter the market. They can be mounted on a dashboard or a helmet, an office door or in the ceiling of a factory. And Bronfenbrenner says companies in industries such as fast food and warehousing sometimes install them where workers congregate to monitor and intimidate union organizers. Plus, she says, “when they’re in the service sector, they’re violating not only the privacy of the worker, they’re violating the privacy of the customer.”

Video monitoring can benefit management and workers, says social psychologist Jack Aiello at Rutgers University — especially in workplaces that require high security, like food and pharmaceutical factories, power plants and commuter trains. “The cameras might be extremely effective to protect goods and people in circumstances where there might be abuse or theft.”

Aiello says so far there aren’t many legal restrictions to videotaping at work. He was an expert witness in a case where workers at a power company were videotaped in a locker room.

“What it did was to completely undermine the relationship that they had with their organization,” he says. “They became paranoid, and some of them were looking behind mirrors and pictures in their houses. People start to feel a Big Brother mentality, that somebody is over my shoulder all the time. And that creates stress.”

Lew Maltby at the National Workrights Institute says video monitoring shouldn’t be over used. But he says it has a place — to protect people in work settings where they may be vulnerable. For instance, video cameras could be used to protect civilians from racially biased police, the elderly from neglectful nurses, and young kids from abusive teachers.

“It’s oppressive to have to work on camera every minute of the day,” Maltby says. “It’s kind of creepy to tape teachers. But there may be a legitimate reason for it. How else are you going to know if the teachers are treating the children the way they should?”

In a novel application, mounted video cameras are being used to make sure fishermen comply with strict rules on catch and by-catch (seafood that’s accidentally caught in nets).

Brad Pettinger has been fishing for groundfish, salmon and abalone off the Pacific Coast for more than 40 years out of Brookings, Oregon, and he directs the Oregon Trawl Commission. He’s installing high-resolution cameras on his boat this summer. “There’ll be sensors on the winches, so when you kick on the hydraulics to set the net, the camera comes on, and it stays on until the vessel returns to port,” he says.

Pettinger says the cameras will take some getting used to. They’ll capture the whole deck: dying fish, tangled nets, cursing fishermen. He says he’s willing to sacrifice some privacy on his vessel to make sure everyone is following the same rules to protect the fishery.

Video-cams spread to more and more workplaces

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-29 02:00

Police departments all over the country are ordering body-cams and dash-cams for their patrol officers these days, as they face pressure to monitor how officers treat civilians.

Those tiny video-cams, meanwhile, are spreading into a lot of workplaces that have nothing to do with police officers and guns.

“Hospitals, retail, we’re seeing them in manufacturing, we’re seeing them in every industry,” says Kate Bronfenbrenner, director of Labor Education Research at the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

The cameras are getting better with technological advances, and they're getting cheaper as more suppliers enter the market. They can be mounted on a dashboard or a helmet, an office door or in the ceiling of a factory. And Bronfenbrenner says companies in industries such as fast-food and warehousing sometimes install them where workers congregate, to monitor and intimidate union organizers. Plus, she says, “when they’re in the service sector, they’re violating not only the privacy of the worker, they’re violating the privacy of the customer.”

Video monitoring can benefit management and workers, says social psychologist Jack Aiello at Rutgers University — especially in workplaces that require high security, like food and pharmaceutical factories, power plants and commuter trains. “The cameras might be extremely effective to protect goods and people in circumstances where there might be abuse or theft.”

Aiello says so far there aren’t many legal restrictions to videotaping at work. He was an expert witness in a case where workers at a power company were videotaped in a locker room. “What it did was to completely undermine the relationship that they had with their organization,” he says. “They became paranoid and some of them were looking behind mirrors and pictures in their houses. People start to feel a Big Brother mentality, that somebody is over my shoulder all the time. And that creates stress.”

Lew Maltby at the Workrights Institute says video-monitoring shouldn’t be over-used. But he says it has a place — to protect people in work-settings where they may be vulnerable: for instance, to protect civilians from the racially-biased police, the elderly from neglectful nurses, young kids from abusive teachers.

“It’s oppressive to have to work on camera every minute of the day,” says Maltby. “It’s kind of creepy to tape teachers. But there may be a legitimate reason for it. How else are you going to know if the teachers are treating the children the way they should?”

In a novel application, mounted video-cams are being used to make sure fishermen comply with strict rules on catch and by-catch (seafood that’s accidentally caught in nets).

Brad Pettinger has been fishing for groundfish, salmon, and abalone off the Pacific Coast for more than 40 years out of Brookings, Oregon, and he directs the Oregon Trawl Commission. He’s installing high-resolution cameras on his boat this summer. “There’ll be sensors on the winches,” says Pettinger, “so when you kick on the hydraulics to set the net, the camera comes on, and it stays on until the vessel returns to port.”

Pettinger says the cams will take some getting used to. They’ll capture the whole deck: dying fish, tangled nets, cursing fishermen. He says he’s willing to sacrifice some privacy on his vessel, to make sure everyone is following the same rules to protect the fishery.

Video-cams spread to more and more workplaces

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-29 02:00

Police departments all over the country are ordering body-cams and dash-cams for their patrol officers these days, as they face pressure to monitor how officers treat civilians.

Those tiny video-cams, meanwhile, are spreading into a lot of workplaces that have nothing to do with police officers and guns.

“Hospitals, retail, we’re seeing them in manufacturing, we’re seeing them in every industry,” says Kate Bronfenbrenner, director of Labor Education Research at the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

The cameras are getting better with technological advances, and they're getting cheaper as more suppliers enter the market. They can be mounted on a dashboard or a helmet, an office door or in the ceiling of a factory. And Bronfenbrenner says companies in industries such as fast-food and warehousing sometimes install them where workers congregate, to monitor and intimidate union organizers. Plus, she says, “when they’re in the service sector, they’re violating not only the privacy of the worker, they’re violating the privacy of the customer.”

Video monitoring can benefit management and workers, says social psychologist Jack Aiello at Rutgers University — especially in workplaces that require high security, like food and pharmaceutical factories, power plants and commuter trains. “The cameras might be extremely effective to protect goods and people in circumstances where there might be abuse or theft.”

Aiello says so far there aren’t many legal restrictions to videotaping at work. He was an expert witness in a case where workers at a power company were videotaped in a locker room. “What it did was to completely undermine the relationship that they had with their organization,” he says. “They became paranoid and some of them were looking behind mirrors and pictures in their houses. People start to feel a Big Brother mentality, that somebody is over my shoulder all the time. And that creates stress.”

Lew Maltby at the Workrights Institute says video-monitoring shouldn’t be over-used. But he says it has a place — to protect people in work-settings where they may be vulnerable: for instance, to protect civilians from the racially-biased police, the elderly from neglectful nurses, young kids from abusive teachers.

“It’s oppressive to have to work on camera every minute of the day,” says Maltby. “It’s kind of creepy to tape teachers. But there may be a legitimate reason for it. How else are you going to know if the teachers are treating the children the way they should?”

In a novel application, mounted video-cams are being used to make sure fishermen comply with strict rules on catch and by-catch (seafood that’s accidentally caught in nets).

Brad Pettinger has been fishing for groundfish, salmon, and abalone off the Pacific Coast for more than 40 years out of Brookings, Oregon, and he directs the Oregon Trawl Commission. He’s installing high-resolution cameras on his boat this summer. “There’ll be sensors on the winches,” says Pettinger, “so when you kick on the hydraulics to set the net, the camera comes on, and it stays on until the vessel returns to port.”

Pettinger says the cams will take some getting used to. They’ll capture the whole deck: dying fish, tangled nets, cursing fishermen. He says he’s willing to sacrifice some privacy on his vessel, to make sure everyone is following the same rules to protect the fishery.

McDonald's on a McBike

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:54
$72.3 billion

That's the amount of debt facing Puerto Rico, with a deadline of July 1st to pay some of what is due. In an interview with the New York Times, Puerto Rico's Gov. Alejandro García Padilla openly admitted the island is not able to pay. Several factors have contributed to the current situation, including the expiration of a tax break in 2006 that caused many pharmaceutical companies to leave the country, increasing unemployment in its wake.

350

At least that many companies filed amicus curiae briefs with the Supreme Court in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage, according to the Washington Post. That legal procedure might have more of an impact, but the real risk for businesses actually came Friday, when they publicly celebrated the ruling on Twitter. As Wonkblog notes, the fact that so many brands risked alienating customers opposed to same-sex marriages says a lot about how public opinion has changed. 

$8 billion

That's how much the U.S. has pumped into efforts to discourage opium growth in Afghanistan. Yet a new report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime says global opium production is at an all time high, largely because of Afghan farmers increasingly relying on the crop for economic stability. Faced with pressure from the Taliban, who use much of the revenue, the farmers have planted more and more opium poppy plants to meet the demand.

780,000

That's about how many commercial janitor businesses there are in the U.S. Nearly all of them are just one person, but a few are huge multibillion dollar corporations. Janitors work alone through the night and are often hired under layers of subcontracting. A yearlong investigation from Reveal, Frontline, Univision, UC Berkley and KQED found the conditions are ripe for exploitation, harassment and sexual abuse from supervisors, and victims are unwilling or unable to speak out.

2

The number of markets McDonald's is testing new bike-friendly to-go packaging. The "McBike" is designed to hang from your handlebars and it holds a burger, fry and small drink. Looking for a #HotTake on this bid for young, environmentally conscious fast-food fans? The Verge has you covered.

Wimbledon 2015: What not to miss on day one

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:50
Your essential guide to day one of the 2015 Wimbledon Championships at the All England Club.

Janner faces sex abuse prosecution

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:37
Lord Janner is to be prosecuted over claims of historical sex abuse after an independent review overturns a decision by the CPS.

VIDEO: 'It's not the Tunisians' fault'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:36
Rick Harber and Daisy Lambert tell the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire why they want to remain on holiday in Sousse, Tunisia, despite a gun attack on a beach resort which resulted in 38 fatalities.

Egypt prosecutor 'wounded in attack'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:34
Egypt's public prosecutor, Hisham Barakat, is hurt in an apparent bomb attack on his car in Cairo, officials say.

Manufacturers plan greater investment

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:33
UK manufacturers intend to invest more money over the next two years as the number of firms saying the UK is more competitive rises, a survey finds.

VIDEO: Baghdad's year under shadow of IS

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:32
Jonny Dymond reports from Baghdad on the first anniversary of the declaration of a caliphate across Syria and Iraq by the so-called Islamic State.

Top Gear farewell divides critics

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:31
Reviews for Jeremy Clarkson's final episode of Top Gear are divided over whether the programme was at its best or past its prime.

Salazar athlete: truth will come out

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:27
Kara Goucher says more people have passed her information about coach Alberto Salazar after doping claims made against him.

Janner case spotlights legal options

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:27
The various legal options over a possible prosecution of Lord Greville Janner are examined by the BBC's legal correspondent, Clive Coleman.

VIDEO: DPP 'accepts decision to prosecute'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:20
The director of public prosecutions, Alison Saunders, speaks to the BBC's Clive Coleman after a review into her decision not to prosecute Lord Janner over child sex allegations.

Suspicious package with 'wires' found

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:16
A suspicious package with "wires hanging out" is found in Exeter, prompting a primary school and streets to be evacuated, police say.

6 Black Churches In 5 Southern States Burn, Investigators Probe

NPR News - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:05

Authorities are investigating fires that have damaged or destroyed black churches in South Carolina and nearby states following the murder of nine people at Charleston's Emanuel A.M.E. Church.

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Cruz: Opposition To Same-Sex Marriage Will Be 'Front And Center' In 2016 Campaign

NPR News - Mon, 2015-06-29 01:00

As a result of the Supreme Court's two landmark decisions last week, Cruz is calling for justices to be subject to elections and lose their lifetime appointments.

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Joni Mitchell 'able to speak well'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 00:27
Joni Mitchell did have an aneurysm in March but is able to speak, a friend who acts as her conservator reveals.

Rates 'burden' for tourism industry

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 00:17
The burden of business rates is falling heavily on the tourism industry, with some paying more than a fifth of their surplus earnings on rates bills.

VIDEO: Passengers leap from derailed train

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-29 00:15
Footage shows a passenger train at Mumbai's Churchgate station overshooting the platform and injuring several people.

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