National / International News

Fiat boss wary over tech challenge

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:40
The traditional motor industry would be foolish to ignore moves by Google and Apple into car technology, says Fiat-Chrysler boss Sergio Marchionne.

Petraeus Enters Into Plea Deal With Justice Department

NPR News - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:33

Former CIA chief and retired Gen. David Petraeus, whose military career has been overshadowed by charges that he provided classified data to his mistress, will avoid a trial.

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Ex-CIA chief in federal charge plea

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:32
Former CIA director General David Petraeus pleads guilty to mishandling classified materials, US government says

Netanyahu says Iran 'global threat'

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:28
Israel's Prime Minister says Iran threatens "the entire world" as he begins a contentious address to the US Congress.

VIDEO: Grim remains of MH17 shown

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:28
All 298 people on board MH17 died when the airliner crashed in eastern Ukraine on 17 July, close to the border with Russia.

Double death crash driver jailed

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:27
A driver who took cocaine and cannabis before crashing into a tree and killing two of his friends is jailed for four years.

Myanmar students defy police

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:22
Hundreds of students protesting against an education bill in Myanmar have defied an order to disperse despite being surrounded by police.

The Secret History of Knock-Knock Jokes

NPR News - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:18

The complicated story behind the simple repetitive wordplay jest.

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Ashley fined for Rangers influence

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:17
Newcastle United owner Mike Ashley is fined for breaching Scottish FA rules on dual ownership for his influence on Rangers.

French families fight shipwreck case

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:13
Eleven years after the deaths of five sailors in the mysterious sinking of a French trawler, their families have launched a final appeal in court.

Tracing the Obamacare subsidy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:07

On Wednesday, the Affordable Care Act faces its next test in front of the Supreme Court. This time, the justices will consider who is eligible to receive subsidies to help cover the cost of health insurance.

That may sound technical, maybe even minor, but it’s high stakes — because the subsidies are at the heart of the law.

To help understand why this case matters, it helps to understand the role subsidies play in the Affordable Care Act. Think of the subsidy as a passenger on a cruise — with apologies to The Love Boat. The journey begins at what we’ll call Consumer’s Cove, which in this case is Thomas Choinacky's computer.

“I put in how much money I’m going to make in the coming year and it literally shoots out how much you would be paying in a given month,” Choinacky says.

Choinacky, a performance artist in Philadelphia, will earn about $30,000 this year. He liked a plan on healthcare.gov, running $300 in monthly premiums — but it only costs the 30-year old half that, thanks to a $150 subsidy.

As soon as Choinacky chooses his plan, our subsidy ships off towards its second port, Insurance Island. And remember in the 34 states that rely on healthcare.gov, 87 percent of consumers get some financial help.

“The bottom line is that the subsidy is Thomas’s ticket to the health insurance world,” says Dr. Peter Beilenson, CEO of health insurer Evergreen Health Cooperative.

On average, these subsidies make up about three-quarters of a person’s monthly premium. It’s a big reason why 7.5 million in the federal exchange states signed up for the ACA this year.

But, Larry Levitt with the Kaiser Family Foundation warns subsidies shouldn’t get too comfortable out on Insurance Island.

“Most of the dollars an insurance company takes in don’t stick around for very long,” he says.

Levitt explains insurers are packing up the subsidies fairly quickly for their final stretch, a visit to Provider Paradise – where they go to pay for doctors, hospitals and pharmacists.

“They are really important to health providers. We are talking about roughly $2 billion a year going through insurance companies to doctors and hospitals in these states,” he says.

So ultimately, if the Court decides to cancel this subsidy voyage - for everybody from Consumer Cover to Insurance Island to Provider Paradise today’s Love Boat will start to feel a lot more like the SS Minnow, that stranded ship from that other TV classic, Gilligan’s Island.

Tracing the Obamacare subsidy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:07

On Wednesday, the Affordable Care Act faces its next test in front of the Supreme Court. This time, the justices will consider who is eligible to receive subsidies to help cover the cost of health insurance.

That may sound technical, maybe even minor, but it’s high stakes — because the subsidies are at the heart of the law.

To help understand why this case matters, it helps to understand the role subsidies play in the Affordable Care Act. Think of the subsidy as a passenger on a cruise — with apologies to The Love Boat. The journey begins at what we’ll call Consumer’s Cove, which in this case is Thomas Choinacky's computer.

“I put in how much money I’m going to make in the coming year and it literally shoots out how much you would be paying in a given month,” Choinacky says.

Choinacky, a performance artist in Philadelphia, will earn about $30,000 this year. He liked a plan on healthcare.gov, running $300 in monthly premiums — but it only costs the 30-year old half that, thanks to a $150 subsidy.

As soon as Choinacky chooses his plan, our subsidy ships off towards its second port, Insurance Island. And remember in the 34 states that rely on healthcare.gov, 87 percent of consumers get some financial help.

“The bottom line is that the subsidy is Thomas’s ticket to the health insurance world,” says Dr. Peter Beilenson, CEO of health insurer Evergreen Health Cooperative.

On average, these subsidies make up about three-quarters of a person’s monthly premium. It’s a big reason why 7.5 million in the federal exchange states signed up for the ACA this year.

But, Larry Levitt with the Kaiser Family Foundation warns subsidies shouldn’t get too comfortable out on Insurance Island.

“Most of the dollars an insurance company takes in don’t stick around for very long,” he says.

Levitt explains insurers are packing up the subsidies fairly quickly for their final stretch, a visit to Provider Paradise – where they go to pay for doctors, hospitals and pharmacists.

“They are really important to health providers. We are talking about roughly $2 billion a year going through insurance companies to doctors and hospitals in these states,” he says.

So ultimately, if the Court decides to cancel this subsidy voyage - for everybody from Consumer Cover to Insurance Island to Provider Paradise today’s Love Boat will start to feel a lot more like the SS Minnow, that stranded ship from that other TV classic, Gilligan’s Island.

Wildlife keeper wins eviction case

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:03
A wildlife keeper wins a High Court victory over being evicted from his dangerous animals sanctuary.

LOOK: Pictures of The Villarrica Volcano's Eruption In Chile

NPR News - Tue, 2015-03-03 07:02

The volcano spewed heavy smoke into the air and lava down its slopes, prompting the evacuation of thousands of people in southern Chile.

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After Weeks Of Controversy, Netanyahu Takes The Podium Before Congress

NPR News - Tue, 2015-03-03 06:58

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is speaking before Congress this morning, in a much anticipated and controversial address. David Greene discusses the speech with NPR's Michele Kelemen.

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VIDEO: Israel's Netanyahu addresses Congress

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 06:52
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses members of Congress at the US Capitol.

Barclays boss backs criminal charges for market manipulation

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 06:39
Antony Jenkins speaks out as Financial Conduct Authority finalises clampdown plans for traders.

Disgraced Rolf Harris stripped of CBE

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 06:31
Disgraced former entertainer Rolf Harris has been stripped of his CBE, according to an official announcement in the London Gazette.

Hillary Clinton's Use Of Personal Email At State Dept. Raises Questions

NPR News - Tue, 2015-03-03 06:29

The arrangement circumvented a process that could have automatically preserved Clinton's email communications in government archives.

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Hospital investigation cost £19.5m

BBC - Tue, 2015-03-03 06:13
The costs of sending special administrators into the troubled Mid Staffordshire NHS trust rose to almost £19.5m, a health watchdog reveals.

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