National / International News

Polygamy May Seem Like A Man's Dream, But Kenyan Women Are Not Happy

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:45

Kenyan lawmakers recently passed a bill that legalizes polygamy without a wife's consent. Member of Parliament Annah Nyokabi Gathecha explains why she walked out of the voting session.

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Walter Mosley: To End Race, We Have To Recognize 'White' Doesn't Exist

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:45

Walter Mosley's writing inspired Hollywood filmmakers and a generation of black writers. He's now being honored at the National Black Writers' Conference. He talks about the award and his new book.

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Despite Financial Challenges, HBCUs Fight To Remain A Bargain

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:44

Historically black colleges and universities remain a gateway to higher education for millions of students. But how are the institutions and their students weathering difficult financial challenges?

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VIDEO: 1D star's nervous wait to meet Queen

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:38
The Queen has hosted a reception for more than 300 Irish people including One Direction singer Niall Horan, X-Factor judge Louis Walsh and former boxer Barry McGuigan.

Five held over UVF double murder

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:34
Police investigating the murder of two Catholic workmen in north Belfast in May 1994 are now questioning five people.

PODCAST: Facebook buys Oculus, and its headaches

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:26

Orders for expensive, longer-lasting things went up briskly last month with durable goods up 2.2 percent. That's a nice enough sign, but it might not be more than that. David Kelly, the chief global strategist with JP Morgan-Chase joined us to discuss.

Meanwhile, Facebook shelled out $2 billion in cash and stock for a company that makes a headset that lets users look around digital environments. The 20-month-old company, Oculus, is viewed as a potential leader in the virtual reality gaming industry. Some users though, report an issue with Rift that could impact its growth: motion sickness.

Plus: Where’s the beef? As a nation, we might really need to know that. For the first time in more than a century, Americans are eating more chicken than beef. Why is poultry taking flight?

Debate: Does Affirmative Action On Campus Do More Harm Than Good?

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:26

Colleges that use race as a factor in admissions say the approach creates opportunity for students who might otherwise be excluded. Critics argue the practice hurts the students it's intended to help.

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Apple seeks greater emoji diversity

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:25
Apple says it has asked the body responsible for the standard list of emoji text-message pictures to create a character set with greater racial diversity.

Facebook buys Oculus for $2 billion

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:23
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 09:41 ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Attendees wear Oculus Rift HD virtual reality head-mounted displays as they play EVE: Valkyrie, a multiplayer virtual reality dogfighting shooter game, at the Intel booth at the 2014 International CES, January 9, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Facebook shelled out $2 billion in cash and stock for a company that makes a headset that lets users look around digital environments. The 20-month-old company, Oculus, is viewed as a potential leader in the virtual reality gaming industry. Some users though, report an issue with Rift that could impact its growth: motion sickness.

People using virtual reality technology have, for years, been dogged by the very same condition that afflicts real-life sea voyagers, car passengers, and those who have braved a particularly terrifying roller coaster. 

Shun-nan Yang, Director of Research at the Vision Performance Institute at Pacific University's College of Optometry explains why virtual reality technology can cause dizziness and nausea:

Head-mounted displays are likely to cause motion sickness symptoms (including disorientation, nausea, dizziness, and vertigo) because the simulated visual world often does not match the other physiological signals generated by the body (vestibular [head rotation] or proprioceptive [body motion] sensation).  For instance, the VR might simulate a pilot flying an airplane, but the actual non-visual signal suggests little motion, compared to what is expected for such episode/experience.  The brain (mid-brain more specifically) detects such mismatch and generate undesirable sensations in an attempt to dissuade such circumstances/activities.  Viewing 3D movies would cause the same symptoms because of the mismatch perceived by the viewers.  The same "warning" signal (e.g., nausea) is deployed to warn the body of undesirable smell or toxic foods.     

Oculus is aware of the problem, and is working to improve it before Rift hits the shelves some time in the future. Real-world sufferers will, for now, have to keep relying on diphenhydramine. 

*CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story misspelled the name of the company Oculus. The text has been corrected. 

Marketplace Morning Report for Wednesday, March 26, 2014by Noel KingPodcast Title: Facebook buys Oculus for $2 billion Story Type: News StorySyndication: SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond: No

MPs to get free vote on fox hunting

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:23
MPs will still get a free vote on repealing the hunting ban, Downing Street says, after ministers fail to agree on easing the rules on farmers using dogs for fox control.

VIDEO: Inside mobile quality testing lab

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:21
Linda Yueh has been granted rare access to a lab where mobile phones are put through various stress tests to check they meet quality standards.

Pakistan holds Taliban peace talks

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:17
A first day of peace talks between the Pakistani government and the Taliban. aimed at ending years of violence, has come to a close.

What Winter Will Be Like In 100 Years

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:11

Milder or wilder? Wetter or drier? A hard, cold look at the future of the season.

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Nigeria conflict 'affects millions'

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:07
More than three million people are facing a humanitarian crisis in three Nigerian states hit by an Islamist-led insurgency, the government says.

Bin Laden's Son-In-Law Convicted Of Conspiring To Kill Americans

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:05

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith was found guilty in Manhattan federal court. He served as a spokesman for al-Qaida following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

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Missing plane search for 122 objects

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 07:01
A further 122 objects potentially from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have been identified by a satellite, a Malaysian minister says.

Hawaii's Police, Lawmakers Reach Consensus On Prostitution Law

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-26 06:56

State law makes it legal in some cases for undercover cops to have sex with prostitutes. At first, police officials expressed concern about eliminating that exemption. Now they're OK with a change.

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Brooks's PA 'wouldn't commit crime'

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 06:54
Rebekah Brooks's former assistant, Cheryl Carter, tells the phone-hacking trial she would never commit a crime for her ex-boss.

Facebook buys Oculus for $2 billion

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-26 06:41

Facebook shelled out $2 billion in cash and stock for a company that makes a headset that lets users look around digital environments. The 20-month-old company, Oculus, is viewed as a potential leader in the virtual reality gaming industry. Some users though, report an issue with Rift that could impact its growth: motion sickness.

People using virtual reality technology have, for years, been dogged by the very same condition that afflicts real-life sea voyagers, car passengers, and those who have braved a particularly terrifying roller coaster. 

Shun-nan Yang, Director of Research at the Vision Performance Institute at Pacific University's College of Optometry explains why virtual reality technology can cause dizziness and nausea:

Head-mounted displays are likely to cause motion sickness symptoms (including disorientation, nausea, dizziness, and vertigo) because the simulated visual world often does not match the other physiological signals generated by the body (vestibular [head rotation] or proprioceptive [body motion] sensation).  For instance, the VR might simulate a pilot flying an airplane, but the actual non-visual signal suggests little motion, compared to what is expected for such episode/experience.  The brain (mid-brain more specifically) detects such mismatch and generate undesirable sensations in an attempt to dissuade such circumstances/activities.  Viewing 3D movies would cause the same symptoms because of the mismatch perceived by the viewers.  The same "warning" signal (e.g., nausea) is deployed to warn the body of undesirable smell or toxic foods.     

Oculus is aware of the problem, and is working to improve it before Rift hits the shelves some time in the future. Real-world sufferers will, for now, have to keep relying on diphenhydramine. 

*CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story misspelled the name of the company Oculus. The text has been corrected. 

Parties row over energy freeze credit

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-26 06:38
The government and the Labour party both claim credit for an energy price freeze on customer bills announced by UK electricity and gas supplier SSE.

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