National / International News

Defiant North Korea Fires Two Medium-Range Missiles

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 18:52

North Korea on Wednesday test-fired two medium-range ballistic missiles, South Korea said, a defiant challenge to the leaders of rivals South Korea, Japan and the United States.

» E-Mail This

CBI claims Yes plans 'do not add up'

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 18:49
A report from business body the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) says there is "no credible plan" for deficit reduction in Scottish independence proposals.

Some Will Get Extra Time To Enroll In Health Insurance

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 18:42

People who've started applying for health insurance but aren't able to finish before the March 31 enrollment deadline will get extra time, the Obama administration announced Tuesday.

» E-Mail This

Travelling miles for heartache

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 18:39
What makes people so devoted to their passions?

The curious world of public information posters

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 18:20
And other curious public information slogans

VIDEO: The school with regular 10-hour days

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 18:15
Landau Forte College has had extended hours since it opened in 1992 and School Reporters investigate how it works.

MPs demand vote on EU arrest warrant

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 17:56
Ministers face demands from MPs for a vote on plans to retain EU justice laws including the European Arrest Warrant.

NHS urged to halve serious mistakes

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 17:49
Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is asking the NHS in England to reduce the number of serious mistakes being made and save 6,000 lives over the next three years.

VIDEO: The day my pop star wife was killed

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 17:39
The day my wife was shot by her fan club manager

Polio casts a shadow over the Middle East

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 17:38
The growing risk of disease spreading outward from Syria

Paltrow and Martin to separate

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 17:32
Hollywood actress Gwyneth Paltrow and Coldplay singer Chris Martin are to separate after more than 10 years of marriage, the couple reveal.

Deaf 'marginalised' by Italian love of gesture

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 17:31
Is the Italian love of dramatic gesture bad for deaf people?

Martinez tips Barkley for World Cup

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 16:59
Everton boss Roberto Martinez feels Ross Barkley will not be affected by the pressures of World Cup selection.

VIDEO: Somalia's battle against al-Shabab

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 16:55
International forces in Somalia are battling al-Shabab Islamist insurgents who control more land than any other al-Qaeda affiliate organisation across the world.

BP Says Oil Spill In Lake Michigan Has Been Contained

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 16:23

The cold weather helped contain the oil. Clean up crews are on the scene and the drinking water has not been affected.

» E-Mail This

Saving the history of the Cold War, piece by piece

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 16:14

The Cold War may be fresh again in our minds but for decades, many tried to forget it. Former Soviet states shed their archives of Soviet propaganda, museums gradually lost interest in the arts and crafts that Soviet artists turned out for the government. Individuals started to get rid of the memorabilia they either saw as shameful or just as junk.

But at Wende, a museum dedicated to preserving artifacts from the Cold War, this is an opportunity.

“So many of our collections have been obtained because there was something going on that put these materials at risk” says Justinian Jampol, the museum’s founder and executive direct. He has a team of scouts in Europe who locate Cold War artificats that might otherwise be destroyed or thrown away.

A cover of the record 'The Dog was Lost,' Flexi Disc, by composer Vladimir Shainsky, part of the Museum's collection. (The Wende Museum and Archive of the Cold War).

In a warehouse below the main level of the museum is the archive. There are rows and rows of shelves that tower eight and nine feet high. Lenin busts are prevalent and a Checkpoint Charlie sign hangs overhead. In a glass case sit a handful of shiny brass toy military tanks. Jampol says those were once hot gifts to give and were made by prisoners who melted down bullets to make the toys.

Busts of Soviet Bloc communist leaders now residing in the vaults of The Wende Museum. (Glen McCurtayne/Coleman-Rayner)

Many of the artifacts are donated by people who may be ashamed of their work with the Soviets but who don’t want to throw away something that was once significant. The museum has a huge collection of items sent by Border Guards, for example.

“It’s always an issue of trying to preserve the important stuff. We can’t save everything, nor should we. But I think it is important to make sure that we know what’s out there, what’s being affected. Unfortunately, we’re too small of a museum to make a difference in terms of opinion.”

Soviet propaganda posters in the Museum gallery. (Marie Astrid-Gonzales)

Jampol acknowledges that their “business model” would make the head of your typical Wall Street CEO spin. They’ll spend huge amounts of money for something is quite small. But, says Jampol, it’s worth it. “We’re interested in going after the thing that can make a difference in terms of how we see the past.”

And listen to 'The Dog was Lost,' by composer Vladimir Shainsky:

 

Saving the history of the Cold War, piece by piece

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 16:14

The Cold War may be fresh again in our minds but for decades, many tried to forget it. Former Soviet states shed their archives of Soviet propaganda, museums gradually lost interest in the arts and crafts that Soviet artists turned out for the government. Individuals started to get rid of the memorabilia they either saw as shameful or just as junk.

But at Wende, a museum dedicated to preserving artifacts from the Cold War, this is an opportunity.

“So many of our collections have been obtained because there was something going on that put these materials at risk” says Justinian Jampol, the museum’s founder and executive direct. He has a team of scouts in Europe who locate Cold War artificats that might otherwise be destroyed or thrown away.

A cover of the record 'The Dog was Lost,' Flexi Disc, by composer Vladimir Shainsky, part of the Museum's collection. (The Wende Museum and Archive of the Cold War).

In a warehouse below the main level of the museum is the archive. There are rows and rows of shelves that tower eight and nine feet high. Lenin busts are prevalent and a Checkpoint Charlie sign hangs overhead. In a glass case sit a handful of shiny brass toy military tanks. Jampol says those were once hot gifts to give and were made by prisoners who melted down bullets to make the toys.

Busts of Soviet Bloc communist leaders now residing in the vaults of The Wende Museum. (Glen McCurtayne/Coleman-Rayner)

Many of the artifacts are donated by people who may be ashamed of their work with the Soviets but who don’t want to throw away something that was once significant. The museum has a huge collection of items sent by Border Guards, for example.

“It’s always an issue of trying to preserve the important stuff. We can’t save everything, nor should we. But I think it is important to make sure that we know what’s out there, what’s being affected. Unfortunately, we’re too small of a museum to make a difference in terms of opinion.”

Soviet propaganda posters in the Museum gallery. (Marie Astrid-Gonzales)

Jampol acknowledges that their “business model” would make the head of your typical Wall Street CEO spin. They’ll spend huge amounts of money for something is quite small. But, says Jampol, it’s worth it. “We’re interested in going after the thing that can make a difference in terms of how we see the past.”

And listen to 'The Dog was Lost,' by composer Vladimir Shainsky:

 

VIDEO: Teen photographer's love for animals

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 16:09
The teen who reminds us we're not the only species on Earth

Looking for the next cyber-police

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 16:08
Universities are looking for next generation of cybermen

George Soros: U.S. could tap oil reserves to punish Russia

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 15:53
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 03:32 VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images

George Soros, Chairman of Soros Fund Management, speaks to the media on Jan. 25, 2012.

The U.S has yet to use a weapon in its economic arsenal in its dispute with Russia over Ukraine. The administration could release oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, in a bid to reduce global oil prices and damage the Russian economy, says billionaire investor George Soros -- though he hopes it doesn't come to that.

"The strongest deterrent is in the hands of the United States because it can release oil from the strategic oil reserve," Soros says, "which would then reduce the price of oil and that would ruin the Russian economy, which lives on oil."

In an interview to promote his new book, "The Tragedy of the European Union", Soros told Marketplace that the sanctions the West is imposing on Russian oligarchs could be counter-productive. 

"The Russian economy is very weak because  the oligarchs who run the country don't trust it and they send their money abroad," Soros says. "So if you stop the inflow of funds, that will bring the Russian economy to its knees."

He says when Russian investors and oligarchs take their assets out of the country, it helps weaken the Russian economy. The sanctions, which impede the flow of money out of Russia for targeted individuals, may actually benefit Russian president Vladimir Putin's attempts to bolster his country's economy.

Soros says the U.S. and Europe need to back Ukraine's position in this dispute, rather than punish Russia.

"Ukraine is determined to reform, but it needs protection," he says. 

Soros, who worries about the state of Europe and the European Union in his book , points to the crisis in Ukraine as an example of why the world needs a strong Europe.

"It was the euro crisis that transformed this voluntary association of equals into a creditor-debtor relationship," Soros says. "And because of this transformation, we have now reached a state where you are going to have one political crisis after another."

Marketplace Morning Report for Wednesday, March 26, 2014 The Tragedy of the European Union: Disintegration or Revival? Author: George Soros Publisher: PublicAffairs (2014) Binding: Hardcover, 208 pages Interview by David BrancaccioPodcast Title: George Soros: U.S. could tap oil reserves to punish RussiaStory Type: InterviewSyndication: SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond: No

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life. Renew here or visit KBBI by April 21 to enter to win one round-trip airfare with Era between Homer and Anchorage. Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

ON THE AIR

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4