National / International News

Disaster On Everest Marks Deadliest Day In Mountain's History

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 12:08

More than 13 Nepalese climbers died while preparing a route on Mount Everest for Western climbers. Grayson Schaffer of Outside Magazine explains that local porters and guides bear the brunt of the danger on these extreme climbs.

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Pipeline Put Off, As Keystone Review Is Indefinitely Extended

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 12:08

It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.

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Simmonds qualifies for IPC Euros

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 12:00
Ellie Simmonds, Stephanie Slater and Amy Marren qualify for the European Championships at the British Para-Swimming meet.

As beef and pork prices rise, demand tastes like chicken

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:58

With the pork industry saddled with a bad case of pig flu, and the beef industry suffering a drought, right now would be a great time to be a chicken farmer.

In the wake of rising beef and pork prices, chicken is now the cheapest protein on the market. Chicken farmers anticipate earning the most in a year since 1996, even accounting for a drop in farm income due to crop surpluses. Demand for poultry has gone up as a result. So much, in fact, that chicken farmers haven't been able to keep up with the increased demand -- and one farmer is struggling to keep up.

"We haven't run out of chickens, but we are sold out, says Ed Fryar, CEO of Ozark Mountain Poultry in Rogers, Arkansas. "The demand has outstripped the available supply for this year."

Fryar goes through approximately 540,000 birds per week, which he says can take anywhere from four to nine weeks to reach market weight. While that sounds fast, increasing production to keep up with increased demand would take significantly longer--about a year and a half.

And that still doesn't change the fact that, for now,  Fryar can't sell what he doesn't have.

"When you're sold out, if you've got a good customer and they order five percent or ten percent more than they normally take, you don't have the birds," he said. "You don't have the meat to send them, and you'd hate to say no to a customer."

As beef and pork prices rise, demand tastes like chicken

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:58

With the pork industry saddled with a bad case of pig flu, and the beef industry suffering a drought, right now would be a great time to be a chicken farmer.

In the wake of rising beef and pork prices, chicken is now the cheapest protein on the market. Chicken farmers anticipate earning the most in a year since 1996, even accounting for a drop in farm income due to crop surpluses. Demand for poultry has gone up as a result. So much, in fact, that chicken farmers haven't been able to keep up with the increased demand -- and one farmer is struggling to keep up.

"We haven't run out of chickens, but we are sold out, says Ed Fryar, CEO of Ozark Mountain Poultry in Rogers, Arkansas. "The demand has outstripped the available supply for this year."

Fryar goes through approximately 540,000 birds per week, which he says can take anywhere from four to nine weeks to reach market weight. While that sounds fast, increasing production to keep up with increased demand would take significantly longer--about a year and a half.

And that still doesn't change the fact that, for now,  Fryar can't sell what he doesn't have.

"When you're sold out, if you've got a good customer and they order five percent or ten percent more than they normally take, you don't have the birds," he said. "You don't have the meat to send them, and you'd hate to say no to a customer."

Why you should budget, even if you're broke

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:53

We often talk about the importance of creating a budget: Figuring out your monthly income, expenses, and what you want to set aside for retirement, emergencies and fun.

But if you don't have a lot of money coming in, the whole exercise can feel overwhelming. Or worse, pointless. How do you budget, when you're broke?

Kristin Wong, personal finance blogger, wrote a guide for broke budgeting on the website Lifehacker

First: Assess Your Financial Situation

If you have more money going out than coming in, here's what your financial plan boils down to: spend less and/or earn more. To figure out how to do this, first take an assessment of your income and expenses. This will help you develop a reasonable and realistic budget.

Have broke budgeting tips of your own? Leave them in the comments or tweet them to @LiveMoney.

Instagram exposes your real friends

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:49

Instagram angered a number of its most loyal users by revealing the true identity of their friends. It happened on Wednesday, when the photo sharing app announced it would be removing any and all deactivated and spam accounts.

"After receiving feedback from members in the Instagram community, we recently fixed an issue that incorrectly included inactive accounts in follower/following lists," a spokesman said in a statement to the tech news site Recode.

The company made a similar move back in 2012, due to backlash over an increase in instagram spammers. But in a change of events, this time users took to Twitter and social media to express their annoyance with the new removal tactics by revealing just how many spammers were following them. 

Some users started a hashtag campaign called the #SaveMyInstagram2014.

Others questioned what would happen if Twitter were to perform the same clean up.

While many were displeased with their sudden decrease in followers, Instagram says it believes users will benefit from the change.

"We believe this will provide a more authentic experience and genuinely reflect people who are actually engaging with each other’s content."

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Leaflets Given To Donetsk Jews Made Waves Worldwide, But Not In Donetsk

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:49

The story of fliers ordering Jews to register with the separatists stoked fears of anti-Semitism. But Jews in the Ukrainian town say the orders aren't real and were intended as political provocation.

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Like Ham? There's A Festival For That In French Basque Country

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:49

The port town of Bayonne in France's Basque region is known for its colorful food and culture. And since 1464, its residents have celebrated the remarkable, local cured ham at the springtime Ham Fair.

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British teenager killed in Syria

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:41
A British teenager said to have "died in battle" fighting with anti-government forces in Syria, is described as a "martyr" by his father.

Keystone XL Pipeline Review Extended By State Department

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:40

Federal agencies are getting more time to review the controversial project, the State Department says, given an ongoing legal battle in Nebraska over whether the pipeline could pass through.

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Captains Uncourageous: Abandoning Ship Long Seen As A Crime

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:26

Whenever a captain comes back and passengers don't, it's seen as shameful behavior. The captains of the Costa Concordia and the South Korean ferry both received blame for not staying with their ship.

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The importance of confidence for women

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:25

Women in the workforce get no shortage of messages about how we should behave. Advocate for yourself … but not too much. Ask for a raise … but pick your moment.

Katty Kay, the anchor of BBC World News America, and Claire Shipman, correspondent for ABC and Good Morning America, authors of "The Confidence Code," argue that women will occupy more C-suites and positions of power by taking risks, speaking up, and being more confident.

How confident are you? Take the ‘Confidence Quiz’

On the meaning of confidence:

Shipman: “The stuff that turns thoughts into action … Confidence is about your belief in your ability to have an impact on the world. To get things done , so there’s a real element of action about it."

On the confidence gap between men and women:

Kay: "The last book we wrote made the case for women in business and how companies, organizations, that employ more senior women, do better than their competitors. And yet as we interviewed these senior women we kept hearing phrases like, ‘You know, I’m just lucky to have got where I am,’ or, ‘I was in the right place at the right time,’ or, ‘I’m not sure I’m the right person for that new promotion or that new big contract.’ And we thought that’s so strange, you know, we never hear phrases like that from men. So, we started to dig into the research on this and a lot of psychologists and business schools have now done research showing that there is indeed a confidence gap between men and women."

"For example, there is a business school study from Manchester University in the U.K., that the professor has been asking students, what do you think you deserve to earn five years after you graduate. Men routinely say they deserve to earn $80,000 on average. Women will say it’s $64,000. That a 20% difference. [At] Hewlett Packard, women will apply for promotions when they have 100% of the skill set, men are happy if they have 60% of the skill set because they think they’re going to learn the rest on the job."

"Women, whilst we have all the talent, we have all the competence, we’re perfectly able, we are undervaluing ourselves compared to men."

On the importance of failure:

Shipman: "Carol Dweck said to us something that was pivotal. She said, “If life were one long grade school, women would rule the world.” And that is because although we’re raising girls in large measure these days to think they can do anything, we’re still nurturing them to be perfect and people pleasers and well behaved — in fact, too perfect. And so they internalize this sort of coloring within the lines, pleasing people, being quiet, getting good grades. They do that all the way through college. They excel. They hit the real world, and guess what? They haven’t screwed up. They haven’t failed. They haven’t learned that you lose, you flunk, you do this. It doesn’t matter you just keep going."

Kay: "What you learn when you fail at something, whether it’s something small like asking for a pay raise that you don’t get, big or small, whether it’s in your personal life or private life, in the end you realize you’re still there. You’re still standing."

The importance of confidence

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:25

Women in the workforce get no shortage of messages about how we should behave. Advocate for yourself … but not too much. Ask for a raise … but pick your moment.

Katty Kay, the anchor of BBC World News America, and Claire Shipman, correspondent for ABC and Good Morning America, authors of "The Confidence Code," argue that women will occupy more C-suites and positions of power by taking risks, speaking up, and being more confident.

How confident are you? Take the ‘Confidence Quiz’

On the meaning of confidence:

Shipman: “The stuff that turns thoughts into action … Confidence is about your belief in your ability to have an impact on the world. To get things done , so there’s a real element of action about it.

On the confidence gap between men and women:

Kay: The last book we wrote made the case for women in business and how companies, organizations, that employ more senior women, do better than their competitors. And yet as we interviewed these senior women we kept hearing phrases like, ‘You know, I’m just lucky to have got where I am,’ or, ‘I was in the right place at the right time,’ or, ‘I’m not sure I’m the right person for that new promotion or that new big contract.’ And we thought that’s so strange, you know, we never hear phrases like that from men. So, we started to dig into the research on this and a lot of psychologists and business schools have now done research showing that there is indeed a confidence gap between men and women.

For example, there is a business school study from Manchester University in the U.K., that the professor has been asking students, what do you think you deserve to earn five years after you graduate. Men routinely say they deserve to earn $80,000 on average. Women will say it’s $64,000. That a 20% difference. [At] Hewlett Packard, women will apply for promotions when they have 100% of the skill set, men are happy if they have 60% of the skill set because they think they’re going to learn the rest on the job.

Women, whilst we have all the talent, we have all the competence, we’re perfectly able, we are undervaluing ourselves compared to men.

On the importance of failure:

Shipman: Carol Dweck said to us something that was pivotal. She said, “If life were one long grade school, women would rule the world.” And that is because although we’re raising girls in large measure these days to think they can do anything, we’re still nurturing them to be perfect and people pleasers and well behaved — in fact, too perfect. And so they internalize this sort of coloring within the lines, pleasing people, being quiet, getting good grades. They do that all the way through college. They excel. They hit the real world, and guess what? They haven’t screwed up. They haven’t failed. They haven’t learned that you lose, you flunk, you do this. It doesn’t matter you just keep going.

Kay: What you learn when you fail at something, whether it’s something small like asking for a pay raise that you don’t get, big or small, whether it’s in your personal life or private life, in the end you realize you’re still there. You’re still standing.

Russia's annexation of Crimea comes with a cost

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:13

The Russians are now suffering a double financial whammy from the crisis in Ukraine. Not only have they seen a big slowdown in their economic growth thanks to sanctions -- they’re also counting the specific cost of annexing the Ukrainian province of Crimea.

The annexation the Black Sea peninsula has proved wildly popular in Russia. But after the first flush of acquisition, reality is beginning to dawn and, like many takeovers in the corporate world, this one is turning out to be very costly.

“In many ways Russia may have bitten off more than it expected with Crimea. And I think the overhaul of the economy there is a bigger task than many would expect,” argues Raoul Ruparel of the Open Europe think tank.

The peninsula may be semi-detached physically from the rest of Ukraine, but it is well-integrated economically with the mainland. Prying it away from Ukraine and plugging it into Russia won’t be easy… or cheap.

“It is really dependent on mainland Ukraine for its power supply, and for its food supply, and for its public services. The banking system will be really difficult to disentangle,” claims Lilit Grevorgyan of IHS Global Insight. 

Building new infrastructure and new financial links between Crimea and Russia will cost a fortune. $3 billion for new power stations. $3 billion for a planned bridge between the two countries. And then there’s the pledge to raise pensions and public sector wages in Crimea to Russian levels, which will set the  Kremlin back a further $3 billion a year.

“In the context of an already difficult fiscal environment, those pledges pose a problem,” explains Sam Charap of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. “It’s not surprising that the Russian finance minister is complaining about the extra cost.”

There is an economic upside to the annexation. Russia will save an estimated $4 billion a year in rent for its naval base in Crimea. And there is the prospect of exploiting untapped oil and gas reserves off the Crimean coast. Not that annexing Crimea was motivated by money. It’s about national pride . The move has won the overwhelming approval of the Russian public – 79 percent are in favor. 

However - say the critics – that is no guarantee that Russia’s actions will prove successful in the long term. Most Germans applauded Hitler’s annexation of Sudetenland - the German speaking province of Checkoslovakia. And – as we know – that didn’t end well for Germany.

Salsa Legend Cheo Feliciano Dies

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:12

One of the most respected figures in Latin music, the salsa singer had deep roots in both Puerto Rico and New York, where he influenced a younger generation of musicians.

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VIDEO: World's prettiest Easter eggs?

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:09
A Slavic community museum in Germany is keeping alive the traditional craft of Easter egg painting.

VIDEO: Kate meets Manly Beach life-savers

BBC - Fri, 2014-04-18 10:11
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have made an appearance at Sydney's Royal Easter Show, during their tour of Australia.

Japan Says It Will Temporarily Scale Back Whale Hunt

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 10:02

After a U.N. court ruling last month ordering Japan to halt whaling in Antarctic waters, Tokyo said it was reducing its target catch to just 210 animals a year.

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Hunting For The Tastiest Egg: Duck, Goose, Chicken Or Quail?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-04-18 09:55

We hard-boiled them. We donned blindfolds. And we chowed down. In our eggsperiment, can you guess which bird prevailed in the ultimate showdown of duck vs. chicken?

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