National / International News

Why do people cheat? It's in our nature

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:52

Imagine this: You're at work, and you're thirsty. You have no money, nothing to drink. You open your office fridge and there you find six cans of Coke and six one dollar bills. There's no one watching, you're alone. 

Do you take anything? Maybe a soda, or a dollar bill, to buy something for the vending machine? Do you take more than one? 

A man named Dan Ariely can probably tell you exactly what you'd do.

Ariely is a professor at Duke University. He studies cheating behavior and he's run dozens of experiments on cheating: when people cheat, by how much, why.

He says that people are more likely to cheat when they're distanced from the idea of monetary value -- you're more likely to take the soda than the cash, just as you're more likely to stream a movie illegally online than to walk into a store and steal a DVD, or worse yet, take cash from the register. 

Cheating can be complicated, too, it's not all black and white, dishonesty exists on a spectrum, and finding balance, particularly between our social behaviors and our business behaviors, is crucial, according to Ariely. 

You can learn more about how and why people cheat by tuning in to the full segment in the audio player above, or, to find out what kind of cheater you are, take our quiz: 

[Quiz by Seth Kelley]

As Temperatures Drop, Shelter Needs For Homeless Families Rise

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:52

A homeless crisis in D.C. mirrors the increased need for sheltering the homeless in several American cities. Administrations examine possible solutions before space and resources run out.

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Van Gaal in Man Utd Munich tribute

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:50
Manchester United manager Louis van Gaal laid flowers at Old Trafford on the 57th anniversary of the Munich air crash.

Libya Today: Two Governments, Many Militias, Infinite Chaos

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:49

Libya's internationally recognized government is struggling to operate from the small eastern city of Bayda, far from Tripoli. The government's fate reflects the chaos that reigns in Libya today.

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Heathrow arrest in FGM investigation

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:28
A woman is arrested at Heathrow Airport on suspicion of conspiracy to commit female genital mutilation.

Your Wallet: Mobility and the American Dream

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:25

Next week, we're talking about mobility--in your economic life, in the world.

Do you feel like you are upwardly mobile? How is the American dream working out for you?

Share your stories of mobility here. You can also visit us on Marketplace's Facebook page, or on Twitter @MarketplaceWKND.

VIDEO: Why Venezuela's condoms cost $755

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:13
As the oil price continues to fall, inflation in Venezuela means many cannot afford basic goods

Contactless card limit rises to £30

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:07
The spending limit on contactless cards is to be increased to £30 from September 2015, the UK Cards Association announces

Morocco banned from next two Afcons

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:07
Morocco are banned from the 2017 and 2019 Africa Cup of Nations and told to pay over £6m for failing to host this year's event.

Man robs dying woman hit by lorry

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:07
A man who stole the purse of a dying elderly woman who was lying in the road having been hit by a lorry is being sought by Greater Manchester Police.

Gerrard ready for Goodison send-off

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:00
Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard is ready to revel in Everton "banter", as he prepares for his final league Merseyside derby.

Carlisle coma report 'a mistake'

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:00
Ex-footballer Clarke Carlisle says he was not left in a coma following a suicide attempt, despite court claims.

My Money Story: What happens when you cheat

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-06 08:52

"You start cheating because you want to please people," says Aaron Beam, "you want to deliver good numbers to Wall Street, sometimes the public thinks you just do it because you're dishonest ... but I think in my case, that was pretty far down the list of why I did what I did."

When Beam founded HealthSouth in 1984, business was doing well. The company is the largest owner of rehabilitation hospitals in the U.S., and was bringing in consistently good numbers on the New York Stock Exchange. Beam was the CFO -- his wealth and reputation were tied up in HealthSouth, and after more than a decade on the job, the market pressures began to feel heavier. 

"We were missing our numbers," he says, "we were not doing as well as we told Wall Street we would do."

So, "out of fear of disappointing Wall Street, out of fear of losing my wealth ... out of not wanting to disappoint other people, employees," Beam started to cheat, to "cook the books ... You sort of learn to lie, you become evasive."

His involvement with the scandal lasted about a year before he left HealthSouth. "I found that I couldn't live with myself, but six years after I left the company, the fraud broke."

Once the scandal hit the news, Beam turned himself in. And he told the truth, and plead guilty. He even testified in the trial of the sitting CEO, who plead not guilty, and walked away. 

"I got three months in federal prison," he said, "I'm very fortunate that I got only three months."

The HealthSouth fraud changed Aaron Beam's life. These days he speaks at conferences about ethical business and has written books, including "Ethics Playbook," about how to be ethical.

And money is less important to him now than it used to be. "Right now, I'm 71 years old, my health is real important, my marriage survived, I've been married 44 years and that's very important to me," he said, "Truly, I think I'm happier and more focused and have a better handle on life now than when I was running in the fast-lane, literally making millions of dollars every year."

To hear Aaron Beam's full story, listen using the audio player above. 

My Money Story: What happens when you cheat

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-06 08:52

"You start cheating because you want to please people," said Aaron Beam, "you want to deliver good numbers to Wall Street, sometimes the public thinks you just do it because you're dishonest...but I think in my case, that was pretty far down the list of why I did what I did."

When Beam founded HealthSouth in 1984, business was good. The company is the largest owner of rehabilitation hospitals in the U.S., and was bringing in consistently good numbers on the New York Stock Exchange. Beam was the CFO -- his wealth and reputation were tied up in HealthSouth, and after more than a decade on the job, the market pressures began to feel heavier. 

"We were missing our numbers," he said "we were not doing as well as we told Wall Street we would do."

So, "out of fear of disappointing Wall Street, out of fear of losing my wealth...out of not wanting to disappoint other people, employees," Beam started to cheat, to "cook the books."

"You sort of learn to lie," Beam said, "you become evasive."

His involvement with the scandal lasted about a year before he left HealthSouth. "I found that I couldn't live with myself, but six years after I left the company, the fraud broke."

Once the scandal hit the news, Beam turned himself in. And he told the truth, and plead guilty. He even testified in the trial of the sitting CEO, who plead not guilty, and walked away. 

"I got three months in federal prison," he said, "I'm very fortunate that I got only three months."

The HealthSouth fraud changed Aaron Beam's life. These days he speaks at conferences about ethical business and has written books, including Ethics Playbook, about how to be ethical.

And money is less important to him than it was. "Right now, I'm 71 years old, my health is real important, my marriage survived, I've been married 44 years and that's very important to me," he said, "Truly I think I'm happier and more focused and have a better handle on life now than when I was running in the fast lane literally making millions of dollars every year."

To hear Aaron Beam's full story, listen using the audio player above. 

'Home alone' toddler found in road

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 08:50
A woman is arrested after a two-year-old girl was found wandering in a road in Slough during rush hour.

Ibrahimovic 'abuses referees in English'

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-06 08:49
PSG striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic abuses French referees in either English or Italian, claims Lyon coach Hubert Fournier.

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