National / International News

Yodel to clear backlog over weekend

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 03:02
Courier firm Yodel apologises to customers for delays to its parcel deliveries and says it hopes to resume normal service by Monday

PODCAST: Investing in coffee

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-12-12 03:00

First up, the latest chapter in the story of how falling oil prices are affecting the global economy. Plus, profile of a South African investor who was badly burned once by corruption in Congo. But now he’s back, figuring he’s learned a few things.

The Media formerly known as Print

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-12-12 03:00
219-206

That was the vote in the House Thursday night, passing a $1.1 trillion spending bill and narrowly avoiding a second government shutdown in as many years. Infighting between House Democrats and the White House nearly derailed the bill, the Washington Post reported, because of some changes to Dodd-Frank embedded in it.

2/3

Looking ahead to the weekend, Japan will hold an election on Sunday in the midst of its recession. Polls suggest Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s ruling party could win as much as a two-thirds majority.

0.6 percent

The portion of online holiday deals researched by the site Wirecutter that actually ended up being unusual and hard-to-find anywhere else. A lot of it comes down to old fashioned consumer psychology, the New York Times reported

800 magazines

More than 800 new magazines launched over the past 12 months. So print isn't necessarily dead, but the industry has changed. New technology allows for smaller runs and more specialized titles, like "Guinea Pig Magazine" and "BeerAdvocate."

24 percent

The portion of first-year college students who could estimate their student debt within ten percent, according to a Brookings survey reported by the Upshot. The vast majority of students underestimated the debt they'd end up with.

 

Man in court over Chhokar murder

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:44
A man appears in court charged with the 1998 murder of Surjit Singh Chhokar in Overtown, North Lanarkshire.

VIDEO: Man's £5,000 bill after mobile stolen

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:38
Mattia Busuttil, who had his phone stolen on holiday and subsequently faced a huge bill from Vodafone, speaks to the BBC Breakfast about his experience.

Billings added to World Cup squad

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:21
Kent wicketkeeper Sam Billings replaces Craig Kieswetter in England's provisional squad for the World Cup.

Uproar over Kenyan anti-terror bill

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:19
Kenya's parliament passes a bill giving the president and intelligence agencies greater powers to tackle terrorism, despite fierce criticism.

VIDEO: Pixie Lott: 'I miss Strictly'

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:18
Singer Pixie Lott has told BBC Breakfast that she misses being on Strictly Come Dancing.

BBC to air AFC Wimbledon v Liverpool

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:11
The FA Cup third round tie between AFC Wimbledon and Liverpool will screened live on BBC television on Monday, 5 January.

AUDIO: Director Lynch rejected Star Wars

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:07
David Lynch reveals that he had been asked to direct the Star Wars film Return of the Jedi by George Lucas.

BBC Music Awards watched by 3.9m

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:07
The first BBC Music Awards pulls in an average audience of 3.9m, lower than the Brits, as Ed Sheeran and Pharrell Williams take the main prizes.

World faces 'climate tragedy' - Kerry

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:00
US Secretary of State John Kerry says the world is "on a course leading to tragedy", as long-running issues threaten a deal between countries at UN climate talks in Lima.

More than 800 magazines launched in the last year

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:00

Get with it Gutenberg. 

In order to print their glossy editions on paper, magazines need to sell ads. But nowadays, that can be problematic. 

"Many advertisers want to be on mobile, they want to be on television," says Andrea Marder-Kick, vice president of global planning and buying at Media Associates, an ad agency focused on ad placement. "Very few advertisers are walking through the door, or ringing us on the phone, saying they want to be in print. Print is perceived as being very archaic."

But try telling the winners of the "Hottest Magazine Launches of the Year" awards that they're about to go extinct. 

"We’ve been sort of like the Kenny on South Park for like the past quarter century. Every disruption — you know, 'they killed Kenny again,'" says Jim Impoco, Newsweek's editor-in-chief, as he accepted the magazine's award for best re-launch at the event breakfast in New York. 

Magazines, it seems, are far from fossilized. They're still alive and kicking, and then some.  

More than 800 new magazines launched over the past 12 months says Samir Husni, AKA, “Mr. Magazine," director of the Magazine Innovation Center at the University of Mississippi. But, he admits the number includes a lot of annuals and book-a-zines like "The Best of Fine Gardening: Tomatoes" or Hobby Farm's "Bacon." 

“The days when you had TV guides selling 18 million copies every week, those days are gone," he says.

Magazines aren’t dead, they’re just different, explains Husni. New technology allows for smaller runs and more specialized titles like "Eye-lash," for lash specialists, estheticians and makeup artists;  "Vapor Voice," for those in the vape industry; and "Skinny News," which is about ... being skinny.

"There is a magazine for everything you can imagine, you can dream about or you can even have nightmares about," he says. "The joke I tell my students: you name a part of the human body, and there’s at least one or two magazines devoted to it."

Sid Holt, chief executive of the American Society of Magazine Editors, says it is a challenging time for magazines. While magazine audiences are growing online and on other digital platforms, the loss of advertising dollars that were once a mainstay of print has been hard to make up. 

"Those digital dimes haven’t replaced those print dollars yet," he says. But at the same time, he notes, magazines are adapting. In order for a magazine now to be successful it has to carry its shared passion between reader and publisher — be it guinea pigs or eyelashes — across platforms. 

"We no longer think of a magazine as this print thing; this print artifact. Although, obviously the print artifact is central," he says. 

Print does have prominence for certain advertisers, says Marder-Kick. For those trying to hawk luxury goods or beauty products to seniors — a group notoriously tricky to track down via new technology —  magazines play a key role. After all, it's very hard to smell a sample fragrance strip through the screen of your iPhone. 

"Print is an astonishing technology. And to begin with, it’s portable, it’s great to look at," says Holt. "It was a great technology when Gutenberg invented it and it’s a great technology today."

800 magazines launched in the last year

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:00

Get with it Gutenberg. 

In order to print their glossy editions on paper, magazines need to sell ads. But nowadays, that can be problematic. 

"Many advertisers want to be on mobile, they want to be on television," says Andrea Marder, vice president of global planning and buying at Media Associates, an ad agency focused on ad placement. "Very few advertisers are walking through the door, or ringing us on the phone, saying they want to be in print. Print is perceived as being very archaic."

But try telling the winners of the "Hottest Magazine Launches of the Year" awards that they're about to go extinct. 

"We’ve been sort of like the Kenny on South Park for like the past quarter century. Every disruption — you know, 'they killed Kenny again,'" says Jim Impoco, Newsweek's editor-in-chief, as he accepted the magazine's award for best re-launch at the event breakfast in New York. 

Magazines, it seems, are far from fossilized. They're still alive and kicking, and then some.  

More than 800 new magazines launched over the past 12 months says Samir Husni, AKA, “Mr. Magazine," director of the Magazine Innovation Center at the University of Mississippi. But, he admits the number includes a lot of annuals and book-a-zines like "The Best of Fine Gardening: Tomatoes" or Hobby Farm's "Bacon." 

“The days when you had TV guides selling 18 million copies every week, those days are gone," he says.

Magazines aren’t dead, they’re just different, explains Husni. New technology allows for smaller runs and more specialized titles like "Eye-lash," for lash specialists, estheticians and makeup artists;  "Vapor Voice," for those in the vape industry; and "Skinny News," which is about ... being skinny.

"There is a magazine for everything you can imagine, you can dream about or you can even have nightmares about," he says. "The joke I tell my students: you name a part of the human body, and there’s at least one or two magazines devoted to it."

Sid Holt, chief executive of the American Society of Magazine Editors, says it is a challenging time for magazines. While magazine audiences are growing online and on other digital platforms, the loss of advertising dollars that were once a mainstay of print has been hard to make up. 

"Those digital dimes haven’t replaced those print dollars yet," he says. But at the same time, he notes, magazines are adapting. In order for a magazine now to be successful it has to carry its shared passion between reader and publisher — be it guinea pigs or eyelashes — across platforms. 

"We no longer think of a magazine as this print thing; this print artifact. Although, obviously the print artifact is central," he says. 

Print does have prominence for certain advertisers, says Marder. For those trying to hawk luxury goods or beauty products to seniors — a group notoriously tricky to track down via new technology —  magazines play a key role. After all, it's very hard to smell a sample fragrance strip through the screen of your iPhone. 

"Print is an astonishing technology. And to begin with, it’s portable, it’s great to look at," says Holt. "It was a great technology when Gutenberg invented it and it’s a great technology today."

Silicon Tally: Robots ate my adspace

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:00

It's time for Silicon Tally! How well have you kept up with the week in tech news?

This week, we're joined by Paul Kedrosky, partner at SK Ventures.

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Consumer sentiment and retail sales

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:00

The University of Michigan issues its monthly Consumer Sentiment Index on Friday. Numbers from the survey have long been used as a leading economic indicator— data that economists mine for clues about what could happen next. This month’s number may contain clues about retail spending this holiday season. 

Researchers started looking at consumer sentiment decades ago, partly to help predict how much people would buy.

"It’s based on a theory that consumers needed both the ability to purchase goods and a willingness to purchase goods," says Robert Leone, a marketing professor at Texas Christian University. "They needed both of those."

Leone says sales numbers bear out the theory, and businesses depend on this data to make decisions: If the numbers say consumers will be skittish, retailers offer more discounts.

This year, the other factor — consumers' ability to buy — looks good, says Chris Christopher, director of consumer economics at IHS Global Insight. "Even though their wage gains haven’t been that great, their expenses — the overall price level for things — is much lower," he says. Lower gasoline prices put even more extra money in consumer wallets. "That’s helping them spend a little extra." 

Japan prepares to vote

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-12-12 02:00

Here’s a bright idea: in the middle of a recession, call an election.

That’s exactly what the prime minister of Japan has done. The voting is set for Sunday, and he actually could be headed for a landslide. Polls suggest Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s ruling party could win a two-thirds majority. In this case, it’s not “the economy, stupid.” It’s the enfeebled opposition, analysts say.

Despite the GDP contraction, Japan’s economy may not be that bad. Adam Posen, President of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, sees parts of the “Abe-nomics” shock therapy working: monetary easing and reforms to bring more women into the workforce. There’s more to do, Posen says, but a victory could give Abe a mandate to pursue additional, significant changes: cutting business taxes, shrinking the deficit, and striking a trade deal with Washington.

NI restaurants enforce allergy laws

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 01:51
A new law means that restaurants and takeaways across Northern Ireland will be telling customers if food contains ingredients that could trigger allergies.

UKIP official to appear at hearing

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 01:50
The suspended general secretary of UKIP will appear before a party disciplinary committee on Friday, the BBC understands.

Family's school bus crash tribute

BBC - Fri, 2014-12-12 01:41
The family of a 15-year-old pupil who died following a "tragic accident" at a school say he "will be with us forever in our memories".

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