National / International News

Tribute paid to rally crash victims

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 11:01
The families of two of the people killed while watching a rally in the Scottish Borders pay tribute to their relatives.

The Fortune 500

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 10:48

Ah, springtime. Each year it arrives like clockwork with its trademark signs: ramps on the menu, crocuses peeking out of the ground, the anticipation of longer days and beach season. Another rite of spring for the past seven years — as long as I have been at Fortune — has been the preparation and release of the Fortune 500, the definitive ranking of America's largest companies. The 500 is our king of lists, for 60 years running the definitive ranking of the biggest in business in revenue, and it is our own biggest issue in every way: heft (390 pages this year), hits (millions of page views each year) and in bandwidth; it is a massive project drawing in almost all the Fortune staff in some way from early April until the end of May. I started at Fortune in April 2007, in the middle of the Fortune 500 close, and every year since I've been involved in some way or another. Over the years I've come to look forward to the day I get to first lay eyes on the top-secret new 500 list more than almost any other day of the year. That's because in its numbers lie telling data, revealing narratives, over-arching themes, countless stories of success and retrenchment, and so much more.

The 500 is first and foremost a measure of scale. Walmart, No. 1 this year, clocks in with sales of $476,294,000,000. That's twelve digits, six zeros and almost half a trillion dollars. We don't dip "down" into eleven figures until No. 23, IBM at $99.75 billion (work on the 500 long enough and the difference between $126.7 billion and $128.7 billion starts to seem amusingly meaningless).

But pull the camera back — waaaay back — and you can see a narrative of business by the decade: The list's first two decades were a testament to the sheer dominance of General Motors; the now-beleaguered automaker held the number one spot from 1955 to 1974 straight, and for all but nine years from 1955 to 2000 (you remember the saying — as goes General Motors, so goes America). Then came ExxonMobil, then an on-fire Walmart, which ascended in 2002 (we only started adding service companies in 1995). The last decade has been a two-horse race between Walmart and ExxonMobil.

Individual storylines play out on the list over the years: Apple has marched steadily upward since 2005, moving from No. 263 that year to No. 103 in 2008, No. 71 in 2009, to No. 35 in 2011, to No. 17 in 2012 to this year, landing in the top five for the first time. Sometimes whole industries ebb and flow in unison, like homebuilders (14 piled on in 2007, all fell off in 2010). Last year Facebook made the list for the first time. Today we welcome newcomers Coach, Blackstone and Alaska Air, and we bid adieu to Yahoo, OfficeMax and Pitney Bowes, among others.

You can also see in the 500 with vivid clarity what we all know to be true: the stunning surge in corporate productivity. This year the collective profits for the Fortune 500 crossed the trillion dollar mark for the first time ($1.08 trillion, to be exact). That's up 31.7 percent over 2012. But in the same time the group added only 180,000 jobs, an increase of 0.7 percent. (I have vivid memories of the financial crisis in 500 terms, too; in 2010, companies on the list shed a collective, and gutwrenching, 821,000 jobs.)

We often get asked who's No. 500 — that company teetering right at the edge each year that just barely hung on as we tallied up the totals. This year our caboose is United Rentals, a Stamford, Connecticut-based seller and leaser of commercial construction, HVAC and other heavy equipment with revenue of $8.8 billion. Hurrah United Rentals! Surely they're celebrating up in Stamford today. (At the same time, No. 501, Irving, Texas- based industrial machinery maker Flowserve, is likely plotting its strategy for knocking United off and taking its spot next year. Because hey, that's business.)

Speaking of celebrating, there's a final number that's particularly key to the Fortune team this year. That's 5, as in 5 o'clock today, when our entire staff will meet in a conference room to have a big official toast to the release of the list — as well as the launch of our newly-independent, brand-new website, Fortune.com. We've been working our butts off on both these babies for months.

Yes, the 500 is a killer set of numbers. But today, five o'clock will also be a quite valuable number indeed.

US unveils coal power curb plans

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 10:44
The Obama administration proposes new rules for US coal power plants aimed at dramatically cutting emissions that contribute to global warming.

Russian sought in cybercrime sting

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 10:39
The US has charged a Russian man with being behind a major cybercrime operation that affected individuals and businesses worldwide.

'Robot sperm' controlled by magnets

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 10:18
Engineers build sperm-like robot with a metal-coated head, then drive and steer it using magnets.

In Bowe Bergdahl's Release, As Many Questions As Answers

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 10:08

The release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in exchange for five senior members of the Taliban has been cheered as well as criticized. A look at why the move has been so polarizing.

» E-Mail This

Wanted: New president of Europe

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 10:00
Who does Number 10 really want to run Europe?

Murray into French Open last eight

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:44
Britain's Andy Murray beats Fernando Verdasco of Spain in straight sets to reach the French Open quarter-finals.

World Cup Rewind: Relive classic matches on the BBC

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:42
Relive and interact with five classic World Cup matches as they happen on the BBC - with 'live' video and full text commentary.

Ukraine border guard centre attacked

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:38
Ukraine's border service says hundreds of insurgents are continuing a sustained assault on a border guards' centre near the eastern city of Luhansk.

91-Year-Old Woman Breaks Marathon Record

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:38

Harriette Thompson, a cancer survivor and concert pianist, on Sunday became the second-oldest woman in U.S. history to complete a marathon.

» E-Mail This

Racist attack victims plan to leave

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:27
Two men, originally from Pakistan, targeted in a racist attack at their north Belfast home on Sunday have said they plan to leave Northern Ireland.

Jacques Cousteau's Grandson Plans To Spend A Month Underwater

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:27

Fabien Cousteau and a crew of five headed down to the underwater laboratory Aquarius, just off the Florida Keys, on Sunday. He and his team intend to stay submerged until July 2.

» E-Mail This

'Godzilla of Earths' identified

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:17
There is a new class of planet out there that astronomers are calling the "mega-Earth".

Native Americans Have Superfoods Right Under Their Feet

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:17

Obesity and diabetes rates have soared among Native Americans as sugary, high-carb foods have replaced traditional foods. A study found that 10 wild plants from the Great Plains are highly nutritious.

» E-Mail This

Madeleine police seal off scrubland

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:14
Police investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann start using surveying equipment on a large area of scrubland in Praia da Luz, Portugal.

Egypt satirist's TV show cancelled

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:13
Egyptian comedian Bassem Youssef confirms the end of his satirical show, citing pressure on the network that carried it.

Britain is giving subsidies for rock music

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:13
Thursday, June 5, 2014 - 14:09 Earache Records

Savage Messiah – subsidized by British taxpayers. 

In Britain, government subsidies for the arts have traditionally been focused on ballet, opera and theater. But now, they are giving a boost to a rather less exalted area of creativity: thrash metal bands, acid punk and nu-grunge groups.

The aim is to promote British musical talent abroad by subsidising the cost of mounting a foreign tour. The grants – which have so far totaled more than three quarters of a million dollars – have caused outrage in conservative circles and have stirred criticism from low-tax campaigners.

But the recipients have defended the subsidy.

"As a band trying to break through, the cost of touring abroad can be prohibitive," argues Dave Silver, lead singer of the heavy metal band Savage Messiah. The band is getting $25,000 of public money.

Is this sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll at the taxpayers’ expense?

“Absolutely not !” says Silver “ There are strict controls on how you can spend the money. It can only be used for things like marketing costs, tour support, venue costs, international travel and so on.” 

The taxpayer will not be footing the bill for: tattoos, studs, chin spikes or other body piercing… let alone picking up the tab for wrecked hotel rooms and wild parties. Not that Silver indulges in such excesses.

“I don’t actually drink alcohol at all. I don’t smoke. I don’t take drugs. So yeah, we’re pretty well behaved, really," he says.

The bands say they need state aid because they’re losing money from illegal downloads. And the only way to make a decent living is to break through into the live touring circuit. 

The government clearly believes that it’s worthwhile offering a helping hand to up and coming talent and supporting the smaller, independent record labels.

Music is an important export for Britain. The British Recorded Music Industry – a trade body – claims that one in ten of all the albums sold in the United States are by British artists; the figure for continental Europe is one in four. 

None of this cuts any ice with the Taxpayers’ Alliance, a group that campaigns for lower taxes. Political director Dia Chakravarty claims that the touring subsidy is wasteful and  unnecessary. 

“British bands have a long history of breaking overseas markets but that’s because they had great songs to sing, not because of taxpayers’ subsidies,” she argues.

Chakravarty takes a keen personal interest in the music industry. 

“I’ve actually just finished working on my first album of Bangladeshi songs but I’ve supported that by having a day job….working at the Taxpayers’ Alliance,” she says. “I’ve not taken a single penny from taxpayers.”

Oddly enough, her argument against subsidy strikes a chord with Dave Silver. The lead singer of Savage Messiah divides his time between headbanging and studying economics and he’s a real fan of the Austrian School of Economics which favors the free market. So why accept the government grant?

“We’re a band. We’re four people in the band and not everyone in the band is of the Austrian School, so what can we do?" saysSilver. And he laughs: “ Yeah in an ideal world privatize everything that moves  and have no state intervention in the economy. But that’s not where we’re at now. We've got to break into overseas touring.”

Marketplace for Thursday June 5, 2014 Stephen Beard/Marketplace

 Dave Silver - lead singer of Savage Messiah and fan of the Austrian School of Economics.

Stephen Beard.

Dia Chakravarty – Political Director of the Taxpayers’  Alliance and recording artist – unsubsidized. 

 

by Stephen BeardPodcast Title Britain is giving subsidies for rock music Story Type FeatureSyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

Hardaker faces 'homophobic' inquiry

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:00
The RFL investigates claims that Leeds full-back Zak Hardaker made homophobic comments during the defeat by Warrington.

VIDEO: Fiddling the books: Czech corruption

BBC - Mon, 2014-06-02 08:58
Twenty-five years after the fall of communism, corruption remains a major problem in the Czech Republic.
ON THE AIR

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4