National / International News

EU leadership rivals hold big debate

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:52
Rivals for the EU's top job argue about the debt crisis, immigration and other key issues live on TV, in a landmark event for the EU.

Those California Wildfires Viewed From Space

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:37

The image, captured by NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite, shows smoke trails stretching out over the Pacific Ocean.

» E-Mail This

Gay Marriages Cleared In Arkansas, But On Hold In Idaho

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:08

In Little Rock, a judge struck down a prohibition on county clerks' issuing marriage licenses to gay couples. In Boise, a judge temporarily blocked a ruling allowing such marriages.

» E-Mail This

To Help Nigeria Find Missing Girls, U.S. Sends In Airborne Support

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:05

The U.S. has deployed surveillance aircraft to Nigeria in the search for the more than 250 schoolgirls still missing. Imagery gathered by the aircraft and satellites will be shared with the Nigerian government.

» E-Mail This

After Nearly 50 Years In Office, Conyers Might Not Make The Ballot

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:05

A local elections official has ruled that Rep. John Conyers of Detroit, who's served in the House for nearly 50 years, has failed to collect enough valid signatures to appear on the Democratic primary ballot. He's appealing the decision; if he loses, it could be an ignominious end to a distinguished career.

» E-Mail This

Hopes Dim For Turkish Miners, But Rescuers Carry On

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:05

Hope is fading that any more mine workers will be rescued from a mine in western Turkey, where over 280 miners died after an explosion. NPR's Leila Fadel has been at the mine and offers more details.

» E-Mail This

On The Bedrock Of Fallen Towers, September 11 Museum Opens Doors

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:05

The National September 11 Memorial and Museum was officially dedicated Thursday in New York. President Obama and other elected officials joined survivors and victims' families in a poignant ceremony.

» E-Mail This

Following the money in America's most expensive war

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:02

Afghanistan has been called the “graveyard of empires.”

It’s a phrase you hear a lot when people talk about our more than a decade of involvement in Afghanistan. And Anand Gopal thinks it’s a bad one.

“There is a sense that whatever happened in Afghanistan was inevitable,” says Gopal, author of the new book "No Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban, and the War Through Afghan Eyes". But we had many opportunities to get this right.”

Gopal learned the Afghan language Pashto, and traveled the country by motorcycle to research his book. He says that the U.S. made a mistake in funding Afghan warlords to help fight the Taliban.

“A lot of these militia commanders and warlords are not that much better than the Taliban they replaced... That’s creating support for the insurgency and draining resources. Without us paying them, these guys are not going to continue  fighting.”

The Afghan economy relies almost entirely on the opium trade and foreign aid. But Gopal says all the U.S. money flowing into the country doesn’t guarantee the government’s survival.

“If you take billions upon billions of dollars and put it into a country that has very little capacity to absorb it, you create corruption on an unforeseen scale. If you talk to Afghans today they’ll say that the last 10 years have been more corrupt than anything they’ve seen in the previous 20 or 30 years of fighting.”

Coaching the Coach

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:02

Executives: They get the good offices, the good health plans, the good stock options AND they get to decide whether you keep your job.

But that doesn’t mean life’s easy. "There are actually CEO support groups that have popped up all over the country," says Robert Sutton, Professor of Management Science at the Stanford Engineering School and co-author of "Scaling Up Excellence". Sutton says a lot of CEO’s end up suffering something akin to the Justin Bieber problem: No one around them will tell them if the company’s on the rocks or if all the employees despise them.

"It is exactly the Justin Bieber problem and actually in some ways it's worse," says Sutton. "Everybody around you has every incentive to tell you how wonderful you are and give you no bad news." Sutton says Executives Coaches often come in order to tell CEOs what people actually think of their management style.

Female executives often need help navigating a certain amount of non-acceptance.

"Women are just beginning to step into big roles, so the whole world is watching," says Nancy Koehn, a professor at the Harvard Business School. She says female CEOs often use executive coaches to help them deal with skepticism. "How do women get done what they know they have to get done, when they’re leading people that haven’t necessarily been responsive to a leader or guide who’s female?"

Whatever particular issues they face, CEOs are getting help in greater numbers. Last year, U.S. companies spent more than $1 billion on executive coaching.

The story behind red M&M's

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-05-15 12:00

Remember when red M&Ms weren't a thing?

It was all thanks to a little misunderstanding back in the day, and a little substance called Red Dye No. 2.

"It was a $10 billion dollar industry. It was used in everything from hot dogs to ice cream cones," says Zachary Crockett, writer at Pricenomics.com.

A Russian study found that this same dye caused tumors in lab rats. Cold War politics being what they were at the time, the FDA refused to acknowledge Russian research, and conducted their own study which, as Crockett puts it, ended up being "an absolute nightmare."

"The lead scientist left midway through, the rats were all mixed up in the lab, it was just wholly inconclusive," he said.

Not wanting to get tangled into the whole mess of Red Dye No. 2--which actually wasn't in red M&Ms in the first place--Mars, M&M's parent company, pulled the red M&Ms anyway to prevent customer confusion. Red was out, and orange was in.

Flickr

Nearly a decade later, just in time for Christmas 1985, red was back, thanks in large part to Paul Hethmon, a freshman at the University of Tennessee who started the "Society for the Restoration and the Preservation of the Red M&M."

"He kind of sparked a 'red-olution,' if you will," said Crockett. "All of these people who loved and adored the red M&M back in the '60s and '70s really came out of the woodwork and joined in this cause."

The animated spokescandy--who was once voiced by John Lovitz--has all those people to thank for thrusting him back into the spotlight.

Housing Is Perking Up, But Realtors Worry About Young Buyers

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:59

Homeownership rates are depressed for people under 35. Economists say nearly 3 million more young adults are living with their parents, compared with 2007.

» E-Mail This

Three guilty of machine gun murder

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:53
Three men are facing life sentences after pleading guilty to killing Mohammed Abdi with a sub-machine gun in Duddingston last year.

Medicare Backs Down On Denying Treatment For Hepatitis Patient

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:48

Two new drugs for hepatitis C can save lives. They are also wildly expensive, costing $66,000 to $84,000 per person. Insurers face paying billions for treatment, or explicitly rationing vital care.

» E-Mail This

YouTube in 2015 election debate bid

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:45
YouTube, the Daily Telegraph and the Guardian are making a joint bid to host a leaders' debate before next year's election.

At A New Orleans High School, Marching Band Is A Lifeline For Kids

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:34

Reporter Keith O'Brien spent a year following the Edna Karr High School marching band. Being a member is more than just a way to be popular; the band offers students a pathway to college.

» E-Mail This

Meet The High School Student Who Took Down A State Lawmaker

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:26

A week before graduating from high school, 17-year-old Saira Blair won the GOP primary in a conservative West Virginia district. Even the incumbent she defeated concedes she outworked him.

» E-Mail This

US trio return $40,000 found in sofa

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:19
Three friends in New York find $40,000 (£24,000) in an old couch they bought but return it to the woman whose name was written on the envelope.

Homes on floats call after UK floods

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:15
Developers should consider building "floating" houses to combat the risk of flooding, the chairman of the Environment Agency suggests.

The Turkish Mine Disaster: How Could It Happen?

NPR News - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:10

The accident that has claimed hundreds of lives appears to have causes that are all too familiar to mining experts in the U.S. and around the world.

» E-Mail This

VIDEO: Hong Kong burns Ivory stockpile

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-15 11:04
Kong Kong says it will burn 30 tonnes of ivory over the course of a year to help combat the illegal trade.
ON THE AIR
Echoes
Next Up: @ 02:00 am
BBC World Service

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4