National News

'Twerk' And 'Selfie' Top Latest List Of Words That Need To Go

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 05:15

What words are you sick of hearing? The wags at Lake Superior State University are out with their annual nominees. Others include "hashtag" and "twittersphere."

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Animal Loses Head But Remembers Everything

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 04:42

They look like fettuccine come to life — little flatworms that glide along riverbeds and perform miracles. Chop off their tails, they grow them back. Split them in half, they grow whole again. But chop off their heads, and not only do they grow new heads, but those new heads contain old memories! Whoa!

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Europe's stock market growing, but economy waiting to improve

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 04:36

On this last day of trading for 2013, a reminder that the stock market is by no means a measure of well-being. Case in point, Europe. Stock markets across the continent are set to climb about 20 percent for 2013. But as the BBC's Andrew Walker explains, that's not necessarily due to an overall economic improvement in the Eurozone.

Singing, Stomping, Stranded Explorers Prep Antarctic Helipad

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 04:34

Icebreakers haven't been able to reach the MV Akademik Shokalskiy, which is trapped in ice. As soon as the weather clears, it's hoped that a helicopter will be able to reach the scene and then carry passengers to other ships nearby.

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China in 2013: A last resort for justice

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 04:21

It was a year of change in China -- a new president, new policy roadmaps for the future of the country. But as Marketplace's China Bureau Chief Rob Schmitz reflected on 2013, one detail that's come up again and again is how many regular Chinese people have turned to him and other foreign journalists as their last resort for justice.

Click play on the audio player above to hear more.

How retailers will be watching you in 2014

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 03:34

This week we're talking to guests about big tech trends in the coming year. With a growing number of organizations tracking people as they do their shopping, the question comes up of whether consumers have reached a tipping point when it comes to feelings about data privacy. 

Chester Wisniewski at the cyber security firm Sophos says we may see companies using sensors to track smartphones in the new year.

"We've seen a real move toward retailers and other etablishments starting to take advantage of these personal beacons that we all carry in our pockets," says Wisniewski, "and kind of using that data to get metrics on how people shop."

But people aren't as trusting that the companies gathering the data will be able to protect their privacy.

"One of the things that we may see really change about people's attitudes toward technology in 2014 is maybe a little bit more suspicion and lack of trust," says Wisniewski, "it has gotten to the point that people are a little bit more suspicious about this data collection that's going on, not just with the NSA, but with every establishment, and whether those establishments truly can keep that data safe and secure."

You may be able to avoid the new smartphone tracking sensors by simply switching off your phone, but that wont prevent stores from watching you alltogether; the cameras are still watching.

"You'd probably be astounded by the number of cameras in every single establishment you go into," Wisniewski says.

And if you're waiting for someone to release a product or app that keeps your data private, don't hold your breath. Wisniewski says short of secluding yourself in a cabin in the mountains, your information is going to get out there.

"Somehow as a society we're going to have to come to terms with this change if we're going to continure to use this technology," he says.

Michael Schumacher Showing 'Surprising' Improvement

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 03:32

The retired Formula One race car driver suffered a severe head injury Sunday while skiing in France. Doctors say Schumacher suffered bruising throughout his brain. They can't yet predict whether he will recover, but they're more optimistic. He's had a second surgery.

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The tech behind the New Year's Eve ball drop

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 02:51

It's New Year's Eve, so of course it's almost time for New York City to do its big ball drop. Technically not a ball as much as a geodesic sphere weighing around 12,000 pounds. And there's plenty of technology in the thing, including LED light bulbs. John Trowbridge, who has been production manager for Times Square New Year's Eve for 18 years, says all the engineering equipment that makes the ball work kind of comes from the Neighborhood. Click the audio player above to hear more.

What Apple learned from a luxury hotel

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 02:25

Consulting firms bring in tens of billions of dollars a year, so there’s a lot of competition for that money. But increasingly, it’s not just among the large consulting firms. Companies like Disney and MTV are in the game too, further monetizing their brands and expertise by selling what they know to companies in a wide variety of unrelated industries.

This growing trend is on display at a Washington, DC hotel conference room. It looks like a typical presentation consultants give to execs, with PowerPoint slides and buzzwords, plus a side table with snacks and coffee. As this is the Ritz-Carlton Georgetown, they’re really nice snacks, including artfully-presented cookies and rich hot chocolate.

But Ritz-Carlton isn’t the mere location of an advisory meeting. It’s giving the advice, about customer service, talent management and more. And a wide variety of businesses are buying.

“We’ve had everybody, except other luxury hotel companies,” says Ritz-Carlton vice president Diana Oreck runs the company’s executive education and consulting. “Health care, financial, automotive, supermarkets, Internet companies.”

Years before, Oreck taught a class like this to a team from Apple. They created the retail store’s Genius Bar, which is an awful lot like a hotel concierge desk.

Clad in a necklace bearing the Ritz-Carlton lion and crown logo (elegant, though compliant with the company’s dress code, which frowns on flashy jewelry as distracting to the customer’s experience), she says the advisory arm is profitable and growing. Already trilingual from decades working in global hotels and resorts, Oreck is currently studying Mandarin as the consulting group moves ahead with plans to expand internationally.

Execs pay $5,500 plus travel and lodging expenses to attend the full three days of Ritz classes. That means a typical set of classes, offered many times a year, brings in a low six-figure sum to the hotel company. Some firms pay additional fees for customized advice and education that brings Ritz advisors to them.

It’s a nice side business that offers not only additional revenue, but also the opportunity for Ritz-Carlton to learn a little something from other industries. Having waves of high-level execs cozy up to the Ritz brand doesn’t hurt either. They’re also very desirable hotel clients.

Other companies doing this kind of work include Disney, which offers advice on creativity, innovation, leadership and service. MTV helps brands connect with Millennials through Viacom’s new consulting arm.

New York University management professor Anat Lechner previously worked at consulting heavyweight McKinsey & Company and still consults through her own firm alongside academic work. She says hiring non-traditional consultants can be a smart move bringing fresh perspective, but that firms also need to be careful in how they seek and use advice from advisors in a totally different industry. Non-traditional consulting has its skeptics, among them, of course, traditional consultants.

But for many who seek advice from these non-consultant consultants, the lack of industry-specific knowledge can be an asset, opening the door to innovation.

“I specifically sought out an industry other than mine,” says insurance company president Greg Howes. “This really forces people to think outside the traditional metrics and benchmarks of their industry and I think it really helps you improve your service.”

The luxury hotel business would appear to have little in common with the insurance industry, but Howes sees parallels and is putting what he learns from Ritz to work. He has sent employees to stay at Ritz-Carlton hotels as a lesson on service. And his company’s website promises “Concierge Insurance.”

There’s a roaring fire going in the lobby of the Ritz-Carlton Georgetown. Downstairs in a conference room, execs are getting advice. But the Ritz isn’t the mere meeting location. It’s giving the advice, about customer service, talent management and more. Ritz vice president Diana Oreck says a wide variety of businesses are buying.

Diana Oreck: We’ve had everybody, except other luxury hotel companies. Health care, financial, automotive. So we learn from them as they learn from us

Apple took a Ritz class like the one she’s teaching today. Oreck taught the team that created the store’s Genius Bar, inspired by a hotel concierge desk. Execs pay thousands apiece for a few days of classes, which means Ritz-Carlton grosses in the low six figures for a typical group, done many times a year. Big companies pay to bring Ritz consultants to them.

Others going after consulting business include Disney and MTV. NYU management professor Anat Lechner, a consulting veteran herself, says hiring non-traditional consultants can be smart. But there’s potential danger in taking advice from a totally different industry.

Anat Lechner: The risk will be in guaranteeing or insuring that the company that comes in has a deep knowledge of the space.

Back at the Ritz, insurance company president Greg Howes says lack of industry-specific knowledge can actually be an asset.

Greg Howes: I specifically sought out an industry other than mine. This really forces people to think outside the traditional metrics and benchmarks of their industry.

Non-traditional consulting has its skeptics, among them, of course, traditional consultants. But it’s growing, meaning any company just might be a consulting company too. In Washington, I'm Mark Garrison, for Marketplace.

What Israel's Release Of Palestinian Prisoners Means For Peace

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 00:32

Early Tuesday, Israel released another group of Palestinian prisoners convicted of violent crimes against Israelis. Former prisoner Omar Masoud says the releases legitimize the peace process for Palestinians. But the family of his Israeli victim says it's unacceptable for Israel to sell "our blood as a gesture."

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Despite The Headlines, Chicago's Crime Rate Fell In 2013

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 00:31

Throughout the year, stories about gun violence in the city grabbed the country's attention. Now at the end of the year, the city's crime rate is again big news because it declined so much in 2013, to its lowest level in decades. It's a reality that often doesn't fit the perception of the city.

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Nothing Focuses The Mind Like The Ultimate Deadline: Death

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 00:28

A Swedish inventor came up with a wristwatch that counts down the seconds left in your life. He calls it "the happiness watch" because he thinks living with the reality of one's mortality can enhance how we value our lives.

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Bon Voyage, Voyager: Old Friends Take Stock

NPR News - Tue, 2013-12-31 00:27

Long gone, but never forgotten, Voyager 1 is about 12 billion miles from home and now sailing through interstellar space, scientists were thrilled to confirm in 2013. The spacecraft carries with it a generation's dreams.

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Can Nasdaq move past Facebook debacle in 2014?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 00:05

Today NASDAQ will pay out tens of millions of dollars to firms which say they lost money from a technical glitch during Facebook’s IPO last spring. The exchange will pay out $41.6 million dollars even though traders estimate $500 million was lost.

Facebook’s IPO was supposed to start at 11:00.

“They let everybody know it’s not going to be 11:00 it’s going to be 11:05. It’s not going to be 11:05, it’s going to be 11:15,” says Jamie Selway, managing director at ITG, maker of software and hardware brokers use to trade stock. “And then not much happened,” he says.

Orders were coming in so quickly NASDAQ’s software couldn't keep up. Much like at an auction for art, or farm equipment, at an auction of stock (which is essentially what happens during an IPO),  Selway says the auctioneer, digital or human, needs a pause to let it know bidding is over.  But because of the onslaught of orders during the Facebook IPO, “the gap that the software was looking for,” says Selway, “to conclude the auction, never occurred.”

And  as markets have become more complex we’ve seen more and more of these technical glitches. So says Gaston Ceron, an equity analyst with Morningstar. Note what happened, he says, to BATS, another exchange.

“BATS had a problem with the handling of its own IPO and it ended up having to scuttle the whole thing,” he says.

NASDAQ says prior to the issue with Facebook it’s conducted more than a hundred IPOs using the same, or similar, systems without incident and that it’s hired new staff. Since then, the company notes it’s raised almost $8 billion dollars through IPOS.

The decision, says Jamie Selway, of where to list an IPO is highly complex. But he says it’s possible companies may be swayed by NASDAQ rival NYSE’s technology. When it comes to deciding when to end an auction, the exchange in New York makes the decision using an old-fashioned but nonetheless trustworthy mechanism – a human being.

Illinois law limits ways police can use drones

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 00:05

Call it the week of the drone.  Yesterday, the Federal Aviation Administration picked half a dozen sites for exploring drone tech—with an eye toward commercial development.  While those sites start exploring the possibilities of drone tech for business, the state of Illinois is about to limit the use of drones by law enforcement.  A new state law there takes effect tomorrow. It says state and local cops can’t use drones for surveillance without a warrant.  

Federal agencies like the FBI and Border Patrol already use drones.  Cops in Mesa County, Colo., have a couple. But they’re not routine police technology yet.

That's the idea, says Illinois State Senator Daniel Biss, who sponsored the Freedom from Drone Surveillance Act. "The philosophy is, put the regulation in place before every major law-enforcement entity is doing it," he says, "so you don’t find yourself living in a Wild West world, before it’s too late."

For instance, Chicago’s already got a big network of stationary surveillance cameras, and there’s no going back there. 

Seven other states have passed drone laws so far.  University of Washington Law professor Ryan Calo, an expert on privacy and robotics, agrees that this is a good time to set some rules.

Border patrol has the kind of military-grade Predator drones that can hover around all day. Local cops, not so much.  Yet.

"By and large, what the police are getting are these quadricopters, that can only hover in the air for 15 or 20 minutes," says Calo. "And so the uses are pretty limited for now."

But the technology is getting better all the time. With the FAA allowing commercial development to go forward, that’s likely to accelerate.  

Calo thinks drones are just one example of technology that's moving faster, so far, than laws that protect privacy.  "We need a fundamental re-examination of some of the fundamental doctrines of privacy law," he says.  "Like the idea that you have no reasonable expectation of privacy in public." 

Illinois law limits ways police can use drones

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2013-12-31 00:05

Call it the week of the drone.  Yesterday, the Federal Aviation Administration picked half a dozen sites for exploring drone tech—with an eye toward commercial development.  While those sites start exploring the possibilities of drone tech for business, the state of Illinois is about to limit the use of drones by law enforcement.  A new state law there takes effect tomorrow. It says state and local cops can’t use drones for surveillance without a warrant.  

Federal agencies like the FBI and Border Patrol already use drones.  Cops in Mesa County, Colo., have a couple. But they’re not routine police technology yet.

That's the idea, says Illinois State Senator Daniel Biss, who sponsored the Freedom from Drone Surveillance Act. "The philosophy is, put the regulation in place before every major law-enforcement entity is doing it," he says, "so you don’t find yourself living in a Wild West world, before it’s too late."

For instance, Chicago’s already got a big network of stationary surveillance cameras, and there’s no going back there. 

Seven other states have passed drone laws so far.  University of Washington Law professor Ryan Calo, an expert on privacy and robotics, agrees that this is a good time to set some rules.

Border patrol has the kind of military-grade Predator drones that can hover around all day. Local cops, not so much.  Yet.

"By and large, what the police are getting are these quadricopters, that can only hover in the air for 15 or 20 minutes," says Calo. "And so the uses are pretty limited for now."

But the technology is getting better all the time. With the FAA allowing commercial development to go forward, that’s likely to accelerate.  

Calo thinks drones are just one example of technology that's moving faster, so far, than laws that protect privacy.  "We need a fundamental re-examination of some of the fundamental doctrines of privacy law," he says.  "Like the idea that you have no reasonable expectation of privacy in public." 

Brain-Dead Girl Can Stay On Life Support, Judge Orders

NPR News - Mon, 2013-12-30 17:04

Jahi McMath, 13, has been on a ventilator since a tonsillectomy operation went wrong earlier this month. The hospital has sought to terminate life support, but the family says there's still hope for the teen.

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Train Derailment In North Dakota Causes Explosion, Fire

NPR News - Mon, 2013-12-30 16:26

A train carrying oil collided with one carrying soybeans, causing multiple explosions and a fire in the town of Casselton, about 10 miles west of Fargo.

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The Other 'F Word': Brewer Responds To Starbucks Over Beer Name

NPR News - Mon, 2013-12-30 14:58

Getting a cease-and-desist letter from a big corporation isn't usually the mark of a good day. But after a brewery owner got a letter from a law firm representing Starbucks, he saw a chance to draw distinctions between the businesses — and to be funny.

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Was 2013 Really The Year Of The Paleo Diet?

NPR News - Mon, 2013-12-30 14:51

Paleo was Google's most searched diet for 2013, but that doesn't mean it went mainstream. Instead, media coverage of one book criticizing the diet may have stoked much of the interest in the diet.

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