National News

Explainer: Why dollar cost averaging is stupid smart

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 23:32

Retail investors – you know, people like you and me and the guy next door who day-trades in his PJs – are investing again. In an interview with Fox Business, TD Ameritrade president and CEO Fred Tomczyk described individual investors as "more bullish now than at any time since we started measuring."

"The retail investor is definitely back, our trades in the first quarter, the March quarter, were up 30 percent year-over-year," he told Fox Business. "They have been coming in increasingly over the last nine months."

Tomczyk said the conditions in the market are perfect for retail investors right now.

"They are getting lower trading commissions. They're getting lower bid ask spreads. They're getting quicker execution. There is a lot of liquidity in the market," he said.

But are we keeping it simple?

Are we sticking to tried and true investing strategies like using tax advantaged investments, diversification and my personal flavor of the month, dollar-cost averaging?

Maybe. And maybe not.

Tomczyk says we retail investors are using risky strategies like buying on margin, which means borrowing money to make wagers on stocks. That's the kind of risky behavior that led to the financial crisis, and in an environment when the stock market feels a bit frothy, isn't going to change the way institutional investors see individuals: as "dumb money."

Why are we so dumb?

Because we do the opposite of what the pros think they should do. We're supposedly always late to the game; we supposedly always buy high and sell low; we supposedly always buy stocks when we should be snagging bonds, and pile into bonds when stocks make most sense.

We're certainly doing the polar opposite of the professionals right now. Banks are  increasingly moving out of the trading business, peppered by the twin shotgun barrels of harsh regulation and heavy losses. Trading just isn't profitable anymore – or at least it's not as profitable as it was – and the stock market is seen as rigged by high-frequency trading firms. So anyone getting into trading right now must be dumb, right?

Well, hold on there. If you want to be the kind of investor who's trading in and out of stocks all day long, and trying to compete with the big guys – like that guy in his PJs – then maybe you are at a disadvantage (actually, let's be honest, there's no maybe about it – that particular game IS rigged).

But most retail investors aren't that guy. Most of us are doing things the simple way, in many cases managing our own money because we can't trust professionals who are increasingly compromised and conflicted by their relationships with the makers of the financial products they shill.

Most of us are using the dead simple, tried and true methods of long-term, diversified investing that really build wealth over time. If that makes us dumb, than I'm happy to be called stupid.

In Mississippi, A Tea Party Challenger Takes On A GOP Institution

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 23:23

After 41 years in Washington, Sen. Thad Cochran holds clout in Washington — and his name is on buildings across the state. But a Tea Party candidate says the time for that kind of largesse is over.

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Poverty Among Holocaust Survivors Hits A Nerve In Israel

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 23:07

About a quarter of the 200,000 Holocaust survivors in Israel live below the poverty line. The government is now pushing a plan to increase assistance.

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The French Ask: Should We Be Building Warships For Russia?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 23:05

France's $1.6 billion sale is the biggest ever by a NATO country to Russia. But in the wake of Russia's actions in Ukraine, the French are debating whether they should suspend the deal.

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The Global Economy: A World Of Acronyms

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 23:04

Perhaps you're well aware of the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China). But now there's MINT, CIVET and more. The emerging markets keep changing — and so do the letters.

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Turnspit Dogs: The Rise And Fall Of The Vernepator Cur

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 23:02

The turnspit dog was once an essential part of every large kitchen in Britain. Bred to run in a wheel that turned a roasting spit, the small but strong dogs ensured that the meat cooked evenly.

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Election-Year Politics Dooms Energy Bill, Averts Pipeline Vote

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 22:37

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid had made a vote on the Keystone XL pipeline contingent upon passage of the energy efficiency bill. Most Democrats don't want a vote on Keystone.

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Donald Sterling Says He Isn't A Racist. Is Anyone?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 15:39

The owner of the NBA's Los Angeles Clippers, who is in trouble for comments he made about black people, told CNN that he's not a racist. Who, if anyone, might qualify?

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Keith Crisco, Congressional Opponent Of Clay Aiken, Dies

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 14:19

Crisco, a textile executive and former state official, died in an accident at home less than a week after apparently losing a close North Carolina primary race against the former American Idol singer.

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A star-studded plea for ad money

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 14:07

Each year, the leading TV networks stage star-studded events displaying their best new programming and most reliable talent to advertisers. And while "The Upfronts," currently underway in New York City, can be great entertainment for those invited, they are also a competition for billions of dollars in ad revenue. On Monday, at the NBC upfronts, buzz surrounded the forthcoming show, "State of Affairs," starring Katherine Heigl.

The formula: well-known movie star + popular genre (the national security spy thriller) = likely to pique the interest of advertisers. 

When the upfronts have finished, negotiations begin. 

"The advertisers meet with sales representatives of the networks and they negotiate how many commercials they're going to buy, [and] what the cost [is] going to be," said Brad Adgate, the Senior Vice President for Research at Horizon Media, who says more than $20 billion in ad revenue is at stake. 

The spectacle of the upfronts hasn't changed much over the years. But these days, due to competition from digital endeavors, advertisers are shying away from a quick committment. 

"It's really because of the TV marketplace in general," said Jeanine Poggi, who reports on television for Advertising Age. "We talk about the other digital opportunities that are out there. And the ability to shift some money out of TV and into digital." 

Digital producers like Maker Studios, Hulu and Buzzfeed, have grown so powerful that they now have their own version fo the upfronts, called the NewFronts, which took place last month. 

In the U.S., a water main breaks every two minutes

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 14:05

Last year, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave the country's infrastructure a whopping grade of D+. That was actually a step up. It was a D in 2009, says Casey Dinges, senior managing director of public affairs at ASCE.

We have a rickety power grid, falling bridges and water mains that date to the 19th century.

"Nationally, there's a water main break every two minutes," Dinges says.

Groups as diverse as the right-leaning US Chamber of Commerce and the labor union AFL-CIO are spending a few days in Washington this week figuring out how to get more money and attention for our nation's roads, and bridges and everything else that makes the economy run.

They're calling it Infrastructure Week, and organizers say they want to highlight how important infrastructure is to the economy.

"Currently, the United States is investing less than 2 percent of its GDP on infrastructure," says Robyn Boerstling, director of transportation and infrastructure policy at the National Association of Manufacturers.

And, there's a more pressing issue. The nation's gas tax-funded Highway Trust Fund is running low on cash. That means the government could soon delay paying for highway repairs.

The gas tax hasn't changed in more than two decades, but Congress doesn't want to touch it during an election year.

"If not the gas tax, then what are we going to do to pay for it?" says Janet Kavinoky, Executive Director, Transportation & Infrastructure, at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

One measure of Infrastructure Week's success is if someone can answer that question.

Tale Of Two Billboards: An Ozark Town's Struggle To Unseat Hate

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 13:56

In Harrison, Ark., residents troubled by the area's reputation as a hate group hotbed are working hard to make the town more inclusive. White supremacists say the effort amounts to "white genocide."

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Salad dressing + pickles; cake mix + prepared meats

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 13:35

Hillshire Brands of Chicago has announced it will buy Pinnacle Foods of Parsippany, New Jersey, in a deal valued at $4.23 billion.

The announced merger will bring Hillshire’s well-known meat offerings—such as Jimmy Dean sausages and Hillshire Farm luncheon meats—under the same corporate roof with Pinnacle’s leading frozen and packaged food brands—such as Duncan Hines cake mixes, Birds Eye frozen vegetables, Vlasic pickles, Wish-Bone salad dressings and Hungry-Man TV dinners.

Industry analysts say the deal will increase Hillshire’s marketing clout with grocery chains, in an era of intense competition with private-label (store) brands, and smaller niche brands that promote themselves as more healthy, natural, authentic, and/or local than big legacy brands.

“It’s really one big junk food company buying another big junk food company,” says food-industry critic Michael Jacobson, executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. “Although Birds Eye does make some very healthful frozen vegetables.”

Health-conscious consumers these days are shopping more around the outskirts of the grocery store—for the fruits and vegetables, the fresh-prepared salads and other ready-to-eat fare. “The grocery aisles are getting flooded with a wealth of new products—either all-natural, organic, whole-grain,” says Hester Jeon, a food-industry analyst at IBISWorld. “So these household brand names are facing intense competition right now.”

Companies like Hillshire will continue trying to lure people back into the center aisles, says Paul Weitzel at retail consultancy Willard Bishop. Weitzel calls the center aisles the “economic engine” of the store--where the packaged, processed, and more profitable items are shelved.

“Convenience is one trend that everyone continues to chase—re-sealable, portion control,” says Weitzel. He adds that post-merger, Hillshire will have more clout to promote its center-aisle brands: by doing more in-store promotions and end-of-aisle displays, and by trying to muscle in on premium shelf space.

Hillshire Brands of Chicago:

Jimmy Dean sausages

Ball Park franks

Hillshire Farm luncheon meats

Sara Lee baked goods

Aidells sausage

Gallo Salame

Golden Island Premium Jerky

Pinnacle Foods of Parsippany, NJ:

Duncan Hines baked goods mixes

Birds Eye frozen foods

Mrs. Butterworth’s

Van de Kamp’s

Log Cabin syrup

Wish-Bone salad dressings

Lender’s bagels

Celeste frozen pizza

Vlasic pickles

Hungry-Man TV dinners

Should the internet be treated like a public utility?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 13:32

The debate over net neutrality rages on. Last month, the FCC unveiled new rules for regulating internet traffic. Opponents of the new rules believe they don’t do enough to ensure equal access to digital content. FCC chairman Tom Wheeler took those concerns seriously, and is set to finesse last month’s rules with some new language.

At the heart of this debate is a question: How should we regulate the internet, like a private service or a public utility?

Kevin Werbach served as counsel for new technology policy at the FCC in the '90s. He says on one hand, the internet has become essential infrastructure for life and business, much like other public utilities. But he added, “in telecommunications regulation, calling something a utility has a particular legal meaning.”

The legal framework in this case revolves around Title II, the law that gives the FCC the authority to regulate the telecom industry. “If broadband access is under Title II ,” says Werbach, “then it’s subject to much broader authority of the FCC to prohibit what’s called unjust and unreasonable discrimination.”

Proponents of net neutrality argue that the FCC could use Title II to stop cable companies from creating fast lanes, like when Netflix agreed to pay Comcast extra for faster streaming. Christopher Yoo, a law professor who specializes in internet regulation doesn’t expect that to happen. “When the Supreme Court and Federal Communications Commission have looked at whether the internet is properly regulated as a public utility, they have consistently said no,” says Yoo.

Under the FCC’s revised proposal, internet providers are still allowed to make deals and create fast lanes. But, the new proposal suggests that the FCC will use its authority to make sure those deals are fair.

Any efforts to regulate those deals however, will likely be challenged in court. “So there are substantial legal obstacles to regulating the internet like a public utility,” Yoo says.  

In the end it may not be the FCC, but the courts that decide how the internet should be regulated.

Cash is still king, sort of

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 13:28

A peek inside our wallets by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

They did a study on how we spend money. Not on what do we spend money, but literally how does it get spent: Cash? Credit?

Here's how it breaks down:

By absolute number of transactions: Cash is king at 40 percent.

But once you take the value of transactions into account, it's a whole different ballgame.

The average value of a cash transaction is only $21, compared with $168 for checks and $44 bucks for debit cards.

Melting Of Antarctic Ice Sheet Might Be Unstoppable

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 13:19

A new study examined 40 years of data collected by ground, air and satellite stations and found that sea level could rise by more than 10 feet in coming centuries.

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Re-Enactment Of Satanic Mass Planned At Harvard Causes Uproar

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 13:00

Harvard's president called a school club's plan to hold a black mass "abhorrent." The Catholic Church called it "repugnant." The club said it was "entirely educational."

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Overused Medical Services Cost Medicare Billions Of Dollars

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 12:57

A treatment that is appropriate for one patient can be unnecessary or even counterproductive for another. But Harvard researchers found a way to estimate truly wasteful Medicare spending.

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Sandwich Monday: Domino's Specialty Chicken

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 12:10

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try a new dish from Domino's. It's essentially pizza with crust made out of chicken.

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Nearly 3 Years After Quake, Washington Monument Reopens

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 12:02

The obelisk has recovered from damage sustained during an earthquake that hit Washington, D.C., in 2011.

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