National News

Connecticut Wins 3rd Straight Women's Basketball Title, 5th In 7 Years

NPR News - Tue, 2015-04-07 18:29

With the 63-53 victory over Notre Dame, coach Geno Auriemma collects his tenth championship ring since 1995 — a streak of dominance few teams or coaches in any sport can compete with.

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Stan Freberg, A Genius Of American Advertising, Dies

NPR News - Tue, 2015-04-07 16:32

Freberg was one of the first to inject satire into commercials. In the 1950s and '60s, he created countless memorable ads using pointed humor.

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Tea Tuesdays: How Tea + Sugar Reshaped The British Empire

NPR News - Tue, 2015-04-07 14:45

When tea met sugar, they formed a power couple that altered the course of history. It was a marriage shaped by fashion, health fads and global economics. And it doomed millions of Africans to slavery.

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South Carolina Police Officer Charged With Murder After Shooting Man In Back

NPR News - Tue, 2015-04-07 14:29

Officer Michael Slager previously said he had followed procedure, but a video showed him shooting a man who was running away from him after a traffic stop.

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An Edward Snowden Statue Was Replaced By A Hovering Snowden Image Last Night

NPR News - Tue, 2015-04-07 13:48

After a bust of Snowden was installed in a Brooklyn park and then removed by authorities, some artists projected a photo of his face there last night, using ashes and light.

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Curiosity changed Brian Grazer's life

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-04-07 13:43

Academy Award-winning producer Brian Grazer worked on films like “Apollo 13” and “Splash” but he’s also behind hit TV shows like “24” and most recently, “Empire.”

Grazer says much of his success comes from an expert ability to ask the right questions, and he’s put together a book with some of his best conversations. Called “A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life,” Grazer's new book isn't so much of a how-to guide as it is a how-to-ask-the-right-questions guide.

When he was young, Grazer’s grandmother praised him for his curiosity and knack for asking good questions. “And I realized I should apply that to every part of my life,” he says. “It made me more than a nobody, it made me someone who was knowledgeable about a lot of different subjects.”

Grazer went on a quest to find experts he could learn from.

“Every two weeks, almost as a religion, or like a religion, I would go meet somebody who was an expert in any of those areas just to ask questions and dig inside what could be the truth of what they’re doing,” he says.   

Early on, he was able to make his way into the office of legendary studio executive Lew Wasserman.

“He went into his office and got a pad of paper and a 2H pencil, and said put the pencil to the paper and it has more value than it did as separate parts,” says Grazer.

Grazer took Wasserman’s advice and not long thereafter, he wrote “Splash.” 

The Risky Boom In Carefree Social Payment Apps

NPR News - Tue, 2015-04-07 13:21

Lots of young adults are using apps like Venmo to settle all kinds of debts. As the apps get more popular, they've become targets for scammers and hackers. But that hasn't seemed to scare away users.

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