National News

TV Networks Double Down On Diversity This Fall

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 08:04

Many new shows this fall feature diverse casts or a person of color in a leading role. But will people actually tune in? NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans weighs in.

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Less Sleep For Little Kids Linked To More Belly Fat Later On

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 08:04

Need another reason to get the kids to bed on time? The more sleep young children miss out on during early childhood, the more likely they are to be obese at age 7.

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In Europe And America, New Internet Rules Up For Debate

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 08:03

Rey Junco of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society breaks down recent developments on net neutrality and the control of information online.

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'New York Times' Upheaval: Is This A Barack Vs. Hillary Moment?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 08:03

The New York Times has fired Jill Abramson, making Dean Baquet the paper's first African-American executive editor. The move has sparked a debate about newsroom diversity and 'editing while female.'

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3 Million Young People Missing From Housing Market? It's Everyone's Problem

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 08:02

Fewer young adults are buying homes today compared with a decade ago. The National Housing Conference's Lisa Sturtevant and NPR's Marilyn Geewax explain worries that it could harm the housing market.

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Supreme Court Will Hear TSA Whistleblower Case

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 07:29

The case pits the Department of Homeland Security against a former air marshal who told reporters about policies he didn't agree with, including a plan to not put agents on long flights.

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Tap dance your way into the White House, kids

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 07:25

From the Marketplace Datebook, here’s a look at what’s coming up Tuesday, May 20:

On this day in 1873, Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis are given a patent to create work pants with metal rivets; you may know them as blue jeans.

And in 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.

In Washington, the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee will hold a roundtable on economic security for working women.

And First Lady Michelle Obama and the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities will host the first-ever White House Talent Show.

PODCAST: AT&T bids $48.5 billion for DirecTV

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 06:57

AT&T is buying satellite TV company DirecTV in a $48.5 billion deal. Like so many other media mergers, the news has executives and Wall Street analysts tossing around corporate buzzwords. There’s the old favorite “synergy,” of course. But “bundle” is the key word for this proposed combination.

And we're reporting from London this week, and what London market report would be complete without a visit to Smithfield Market? Where even at 1:30 in the morning you can buy wholesale bits of cattle. Michell Hucks, who works at Abslom and Tribe at Smithfield, gives us an inside look.

Banks, brokers, markets -- London has it all. Add to that a sturdy legal system and you can begin to understand why it's the financial capital of the world. The city is loved by its locals and foreigners seeking a safe -- and profitable -- haven.

 

Fired 'New York Times' Editor: 'Losing A Job You Love Hurts'

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 06:38

In a commencement speech, Jill Abramson used humor to tackle her controversial dismissal from The New York Times. Like the college students before her, she said, she doesn't know what's next for her.

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Gordon Willis, Cinematographer Who Gave Woody Allen Films Their Look, Dies

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 05:53

He shot eight films with Woody Allen and was particularly known for his work on dark films of the 1970s, such as the Godfather series. Wills was dubbed the "Prince of Darkness" for his use of shadows.

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U.S. Files Criminal Charges Against Chinese Officials Over Cyberspying

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 05:42

The Justice Department accuses five Chinese officials of stealing trade secrets by spying using military and intelligence facilities. These are the first charges of their kind to be made by the U.S.

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AT&T’s $48.5 billion bid for your everything

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 05:16

AT&T is buying satellite TV company DirecTV in a $48.5 billion deal. Like so many other media mergers, the news has executives and Wall Street analysts tossing around corporate buzzwords. There’s the old favorite “synergy,” of course. But “bundle” is the key word for this proposed combination.

“They can bundle this with a broadband product and offer a bundle of voice, video and broadband, which they haven’t been able to do in a lot of their footprint up until now,” says Jonathan Chaplin at New Street Research.

Grabbing America’s biggest satellite provider allows AT&T to expand its move to sell more services on one bill nationwide.

If the deal goes through, AT&T would be the second largest American pay TV operator. Its 26 million customers would be just behind a combined Comcast-Time Warner Cable, which would have 30 million if its own proposed merger goes through.

AT&T is already offering significant concessions, enough that Wall Street expects regulators will let its deal go through.

Mark Garrison: Media mergers tend to be heavy on corporate buzzwords. Synergy is an old favorite. Bundle is popular these days and Jonathan Chaplin at New Street Research says this deal is bundle-icious.

Jonathan Chaplin: They can bundle this with a broadband product and offer a bundle of voice, video and broadband, which they haven’t been able to do in a lot of their footprint up until now.

AT&T wants to sell you everything on one bill. Grabbing America’s biggest satellite provider lets them do that nationwide. If all goes through, AT&T will be the second largest pay TV operator. That means regulators will take a close look. Chaplin and other analysts believe AT&T’s offer to make concessions will be enough.

Chaplin: This is a deal that’s gonna get through.

DirecTV’s Latin American business is also a factor, says Macquarie senior analyst Amy Yong.

Amy Yong: That is a clear growth opportunity for AT&T over the next few years.

The companies expect the deal to close within a year. In New York, I'm Mark Garrison, for Marketplace.

AT&T, DirecTV And Finding A Prom Date: Reactions To Merger

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 05:14

"It's kind of like trying to find a date before the prom," one analyst says of consolidation in the media industry. Some experts are criticizing the deal's strategy and potential impact on consumers.

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Russia Says It Has Ordered Its Troops Away From Ukraine Border

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 04:55

This is the second time Russia says it is moving its troops, but NATO says it has yet to see a significant shift in the position of Russian forces.

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Russia and London: The ties that bind

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 03:31

Banks, brokers, markets -- London has it all.

Add to that a sturdy legal system and you can begin to understand why it's the financial capital of the world. The city is loved by its locals and foreigners seeking a safe -- and profitable -- haven. 

Jamison Firestone, an American lawyer based in London, has years of experience helping American and European companies do business in Russia. Firestone, who previously lived and worked in Russia, fled the country after his law patner Sergei Magnitsky died in Russian custody when he was arrested on tax evasion charges. Magnitsky's supporters say he was beaten and killed by Russian authorities for calling attention to corruption, something Russian officials deny.

The whole affair is just one example of why Russians are looking to take their money out of Moscow and park it elsewhere, according to Firestone. Click on the audio player above to hear more.

 

Russia and London: The ties that bind

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 03:31

Banks, brokers, markets -- London has it all.

Add to that a sturdy legal system and you can begin to understand why it's the financial capital of the world. The city is loved by its locals and foreigners seeking a safe -- and profitable -- haven. 

Jamison Firestone, an American lawyer based in London, has years of experience helping American and European companies do business in Russia. Firestone, who previously lived and worked in Russia, fled the country after his law patner Sergei Magnitsky died in Russian custody when he was arrested on tax evasion charges. Magnitsky's supporters say he was beaten and killed by Russian authorities for calling attention to corruption, something Russian officials deny.

The whole affair is just one example of why Russians are looking to take their money out of Moscow and park it elsewhere, according to Firestone. Click on the audio player above to hear more.

 

South Korea's President Will Disband Coast Guard

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 03:24

President Park Geun-hye announced the changes a bit more than one month after the ferry Sewol sank, killing more than 300 people. It also comes as South Korea prepares to hold national elections.

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Robots, the space program and innovation

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 02:39

A robotics competitions gets underway on Monday at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. College students have to build and design a robot that can dig lunar solid, for example, to be used during a mission to Mars.

Experts say competitions like these help foster innovation and can even help bring ideas to market.

 "That's one area where I think you might be getting neat ideas on the cheap," says Ross Mead, a doctoral student studying robotics at the University of Southern California. 

He says the competitions are exciting and also give companies, or NASA, the opportunity to see problems solved in different ways.

Given the deep budget cuts to NASA, competitions are an especially good idea for the space agency. 

"NASA's leveraging the budget they have with trying to stimulate people working outside of NASA to come up with things that could be really helpful to them," says Tom Kinnear, who teaches entrepreneurship at the University of Michigan. 

But perhaps the greatest reason competitions work Kinnear said, is that people love to win.

Why Education Is The Most Important Revolution Of Our Time

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 02:03

The ways learning happens in the US are shifting rapidly. We're out to capture learning in its natural habitat, from soccer fields to science labs, boardrooms to bedrooms. Welcome to NPR Ed.

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Russian President Putin Orders Troops Near Ukraine To Return Home

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 01:01

The Kremlin announced Vladimir Putin's decision on Monday. The move appears to indicate Putin's intention to de-escalate the crisis over Ukraine.

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