National News

U.S. Coast Guard Calls Off Atlantic Search For 4 British Sailors

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 14:08

The U.K.'s most famous yachtsman has joined families of the missing crew members of a 40-foot sailboat in urging that the search resume. The yacht disappeared Saturday.

» E-Mail This

Task Force Says Asking All Patients About Suicide Won't Cut Risk

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:57

Suicide is a major cause of death, and there's no evidence that screening everybody will reduce the toll, a federal panel says. But doctors, family and friends can help, researchers say.

» E-Mail This

A coffee plant disease threatens more than prices

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:37

Farmers and harvesters in Central and South America have been hit hard by Roya, or "coffee rust," a fast-spreading fungus that infects the leaves of coffee plants. Roya has caused an estimated $1 billion in damage, and threatened the livelihoods of more than half a million families from Mexico to Peru.

"Entire fields have just been devastated by the rust," said Jonathan Rosenthal, executive director of Cooperative Coffees, who saw the impact of the rust in Honduras. "The trees have turned to skeletons. It's like a ghost town." 

The U.S. is stepping up its efforts to help eradicate the disease, partnering with Texas A&M's World Coffee Research Center. Coffee farming has lifted many families in Central and South America out of poverty. USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah says the organization's Feed the Future program has connected thousands of coffee growers to companies including Starbucks and Peet's. In some cases, Shah said, those farmers have seen their yearly incomes double or triple. He warns that as families fall into poverty, they become increasingly susceptible to the influence of drug traffickers and gangs.

"They prey upon communities that are poor, where lots of children are hungry, and they offer them an illicit income opportunity by producing drugs and selling drugs," Shah said. 

Fungicides are able to treat the blight, but many small farmers can't afford them. 

"The fungicide requires investment; the tools that are used to apply the fungicide require investment," said Lindsey Bolger, vice president of coffee sourcing and excellence for Keurig Green Mountain. "In some cases, these farmers just don't have the resources that they need." 

U.S., Nigeria Reach Deal On Intelligence Sharing

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:34

The U.S. will now provide intelligence analysis to Nigeria in an effort to find the more than 200 girls kidnapped by the militant group Boko Haram.

» E-Mail This

Unpacking the AT&T-DirecTV deal

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:29

Over the weekend, AT&T announced it plans to buy DirecTV for $48.5 billion. That is, of course, pending approval from federal regulators that are already busy sorting out a different telecommunications merger: Comcast’s bid to buy Time Warner Cable.

“Big fish are swallowing small fish,” says Reed Hundt, former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, of the changing media landscape. “And if you want to avoid being swallowed, you need to be a bigger and bigger fish.”  AT&T, which is primarily a wireless provider, wants to diversify – to be able to sell customers phone service, internet access, and television.

And its advantage in selling regulators on the deal? Its size. "In terms of the pay TV business," says Todd Rethemeier of Hudson Square, "AT&T is a relatively small player."

Fiery British Imam Found Guilty Of Terrorism Charges

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 13:00

Abu Hamza, an Islamic cleric alleged to have started an al-Qaida camp in the U.S., has been convicted on terrorism charges in a New York courtroom.

» E-Mail This

AT&T And DirecTV Mega-Merger Spells Changes For Media Landscape

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:16

AT&T's $49 billion acquisition of DirecTV now faces regulatory scrutiny. Meanwhile, a deal merging Comcast and Time Warner Cable is also in the works. Consumer advocates worry about consolidation, but many observers think the deals could hold down costs for the merged companies.

» E-Mail This

In Rare Concession, Credit Suisse Admits Criminal Wrongdoing

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:16

Credit Suisse will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay over $2 billion in fines in connection to allegations of tax evasion. But the CEO and chairman are reportedly expected to keep their jobs.

» E-Mail This

The Blogging Battlegrounds Of Eastern Ukraine

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:16

A social media struggle is unfolding in eastern Ukraine, as bloggers on both Ukrainian and separatist sides plead their cases. But many find they face surveillance, trolls and threats as they work.

» E-Mail This

In 'Raging Bull' Ruling, High Court Sides With Co-Writer's Daughter

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:16

The Supreme Court delivered a blow on behalf of writers, giving a screenwriter's daughter a chance to prove in court that the critically acclaimed movie Raging Bull infringed her father's copyright.

» E-Mail This

The Mood In Abuja, Where Missing Schoolgirls Cast Long Shadow

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:16

NPR's Gregory Warner talks to Robert Siegel about the mood and politics in the city of Abuja, as Nigeria struggles to deal with the schoolgirl abduction and its growing militant insurgency.

» E-Mail This

With Cartels On The Run, Mexican Lime Farmers Keep More Of The Green

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:16

Thanks to a big spring crop in Veracruz and police crackdowns on drug cartels, high prices for Mexican limes are falling earthward, just in time for summer cocktails. Mexican farmers are celebrating.

» E-Mail This

Charges Of Chinese Cybercrimes To Play Out In American Courts

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:16

The Justice Department has filed charges against five members of the Chinese military, alleging that they're hackers who committed espionage against U.S. companies.

» E-Mail This

NASA Chief Dismisses Concern Over Russia Quitting Space Station

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:04

Administrator Charles Bolden said no one country was indispensable to the ISS after Moscow last week said it would not participate in a plan to extend the station's life past 2020.

» E-Mail This

For Brazil's Soccer Stars, Careers Often Begin On Makeshift Fields

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:03

The soccer-mad country produces some of the world's best players. They often come from shantytowns, where they learn the game playing barefoot in the streets or on dusty fields.

» E-Mail This

As Court Fees Rise, The Poor Are Paying The Price

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 12:02

An NPR investigation has found an explosion in the use of fees charged to criminal defendants across the country, which has created a system of justice that targets the poor.

» E-Mail This

Why Google isn't really 'free'

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-19 11:43

Martin Smith says its OK for you to be outraged by the NSA's surveillance programs, but still use Google and Facebook every day.

“People like the connectivity that they get out of giving information to private companies,” says Smith, producer of the two-part Frontline documentary "United States of Secrets". “And we haven’t seen the kind of abuses [with private companies] that we associate with government overreach. When George Orwell wrote "1984", it was about government. It wasn’t about private corporations.”

But private companies aren’t totally in the clear. Companies like Google may not have been doing the spying. But Martin says that when the government came calling, they didn’t ask many questions.

The documentary includes a clip of President Bush speaking shortly after 9/11:

BUSH: “The new law that I signed today will allow surveillance of all communications used by terrorists. Including emails, the internet, and cell phones.”

“It was kind remarkable to go back and in the context of what we know now listen to what President Bush was then saying,” says Smith “It was all laid out. The companies clearly had to know.

Smith says what we need to remember is that services like Gmail aren’t really free. At heart, Google is an advertising company. They make money by selling stuff to their users. The more data they have, the better the internet giant is at selling their users more stuff

“When Sergey Brin and Larry Page of Google put together their search engine, that could have been a service that you paid for. Instead, its a 'free service.' But what we are giving in return is access to our personal data.”

Frontline's"United States of Secrets" Part II airs Tuesaday night on PBS.

Victories In Oregon, Utah, For Same-Sex-Marriage Proponents

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 11:08

In Oregon, a federal judge overturned a state ban on the practice and in Utah, a judge said the state must recognize hundreds of gay marriages that had already taken place.

» E-Mail This

Sandwich Monday: The White Castle Waffle Breakfast Sandwich

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 10:52

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try the latest bewaffled breakfast item: the White Castle Waffle Breakfast Sandwich.

» E-Mail This

Occupy Wall Street Activist Gets 90 Days For Assaulting Officer

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-19 10:48

Cecily McMillan was convicted earlier this month of elbowing a police officer during her arrest at an OWS rally in March 2012.

» E-Mail This

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4