National News

Reports: Marco Rubio Says He's Running For President

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 07:29

The Florida senator has had a meteoric rise in politics. He served at the state level beginning in 2000. In 2010, he was elected to the Senate, where he established himself as a GOP leader.

» E-Mail This

And The Fate Of The Hermaphrodite Goat Is...

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 06:48

The authorities in Gaza decided that the animal had to be slaughtered.

» E-Mail This

After Global Protests, Kenya Finally Sentences 3 Men Who Raped A Teen

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 06:01

The only punishment for three of the attackers who brutally raped the 16-year-old in 2013 was cutting grass. The world protested, and Monday they were finally sentenced to 15 years in prison.

» E-Mail This

A Far-Right Family Feud In France Appears To Claim Movement's Icon

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 05:19

National Front founder Jean-Marie Le Pen won't run in the upcoming regional elections after his daughter and political successor criticized his remarks about gas chambers being a "detail" of history.

» E-Mail This

Golf Celebrates Its New Hero: Masters Winner Jordan Spieth

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 04:42

The New York Times is calling Spieth, 21, "a composite of several of the best golfers the United States has produced."

» E-Mail This

China Restricts Travel By Shenzen Residents To Hong Kong

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 04:04

The move, NPR's Frank Langfitt says, is "designed to assuage Hong Kongers angry with mainlanders who buy up goods." Critics say visitors from the mainland have driven up prices in Hong Kong.

» E-Mail This

Günter Grass, Who Confronted Germany's Past As Well As His Own, Dies At 87

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 03:30

In 2006, the Nobel prize-winning author of The Tin Drum admitted that as a teen during World War II, he had served with the Waffen-SS — the combat unit of the Nazi Party's elite military police force.

» E-Mail This

Gunter Grass, Nobel-Winning Author Of 'The Tin Drum,' Dies At 87

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 03:08

The news was announced by his publisher, which did not provide a cause. Grass was one of Germany's leading intellectuals after World War II, but admitted in 2006 that he had served in the Waffen SS.

» E-Mail This

'Hillary Clinton' Is Back, But Will There Be A Return Of The Rodham?

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 03:03

The former first lady and secretary of state has staked out her own ground. But it's notable that as she runs to be the first woman president, she's dropped the maiden name that was once a staple.

» E-Mail This

PODCAST: On-call scheduling may violate state law

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 03:00

Airing on Monday, April 13, 2015: The attorney general of the state of New York is putting big retailers like the Gap and Target under scrutiny. Warning letters went out over the weekend. The question is, are they violating state law when they use a system known as "on-call"scheduling? For context, we turn to Thomas Kochan is a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Next, the e-commerce site for the maker movement, Etsy, is set to sell stock to the public for the first time this week.  But to raise the cash from this week's IPO, Etsy is setting its sights on smaller, individual investors. Finally,  lawmakers in Georgia this month decided to renew a tax credit for video game companies for three more years. One forecast puts the video game market at $93 billion this year. 

A sneak preview of our interview with Seth Meyers

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00

If you listened closely to the opening of the show last week you heard Kai Ryssdal was hosting from New York. He was there working on a few pieces, including an interview with Seth Meyers, host of "Late Night" on NBC and former "Saturday Night Live" head writer.

Kai has always wanted to have Meyers on the show, and he asked Meyers who he dreams of getting on "Late Night." His answer isn't surprising coming from the former anchor of "Weekend Update."

Check out the bonus clip below and listen Monday for the full conversation.

Wage based on public assistance

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00

A new report out today by the UC Berkeley Labor Center looks at the amount of money state and federal taxpayers spend on public assistance programs for low wage workers between 2009 and 2011 they cost nearly $153 billion per year, more than half of the total spent on public assistance. While the purpose of the social safety net to help low income families get by, the worry is that employers may be building their pay structure around this taxpayer support. 

Some companies like McDonald’s, GAP, Target and others have already instituted pay increases and some states are putting pressure on companies to pay more. California for example is going to publicly list the names of employers with more than 100 workers on Medicaid. Additionally, more than 20 state legislatures have passed minimum wage increases for 2015.

 

 

wages based on public assistance

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00

A new report out today by the UC Berkeley Labor Center looks at the amount of money state and federal taxpayers spend on public assistance programs for low wage workers between 2009 and 2011 they cost nearly $153 billion per year, more than half of the total spent on public assistance. While the purpose of the social safety net to help low income families get by, the worry is that employers may be building their pay structure around this taxpayer support. 

Some companies like McDonald’s, GAP, Target and others have already instituted pay increases and some states are putting pressure on companies to pay more. California for example is going to publicly list the names of employers with more than 100 workers on Medicaid. Additionally, more than 20 state legislatures have passed minimum wage increases for 2015.

 

 

The Art of Selling

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00

When museums face budget cuts, should they turn to their art works for income? For that, we consult Blake Gopnik, critic at large at Artnet News and contributor to the NY Times. We talk about the valuation of art, opportunity cost of selling, and what this means for the next generation. 

For more works by Gopnik, visit blakegopnik.com. 

Click on the multimedia player above to hear more. 

A crafty IPO

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00
Etsy, the quirky e-commerce site goes public very soon. Last year, the online retail platform generated revenues approaching $200 million, a jump of about 56 percent over the year before, according to SEC filings. But to raise the cash  from this week’s IPO,,Etsy is reportedly focusing on small investors.    Wendy Liebmann, CEO of WSL Strategic Retail, says as Etsy grows, the company wants to show it’s not selling out.  Etsy sellers are reportedly among its target investors. Kirthi Kalyanam, who teaches marketing at Santa Clara University, says that’s a good way to avoid tensions down the road.   “It becomes easier from a corporate governance point of view, because all the decisions you make are pretty well aligned,” he says.    Kalyanam says without that alignment, the company is more susceptible to pressure from big outside investors who couldn’t care less about vintage bath towels if stock prices are in the toilet.

Tallying the return investments in medical records

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00

Let's face it, a lot of government reports tend to suffer the indignity of dust -- they get set aside, forgotten about. 

But some health experts think a new report from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology may force a change. That’s because after taxpayers have spent around $30 billion in part to share patient data, the government has said it’s not getting enough for its money.

And hospitals and software IT vendors all share some of that blame. This report has done something that’s been a long time coming; it’s named a pernicious problem in health IT.

It’s called data blocking, says Michigan’s Julia Adler-Milstein. “This is a strong statement of who they believe is engaging in bad behavior,” she says. 

Both software companies and hospitals have engaged in this bad behavior according to the report, which costs us billions in wasted care every year.

Adler-Milstein says today just 14 percent of doctors share patient data, and only a third of hospitals because some companies have put their own financial interests before the common good. Former Washington health IT chief Farzad Mostashari says the report put people on notice this won’t be tolerated anymore.

“The lens is focusing on you. You could have thought that no one is able to see me, but now comes it comes into clear focus, “he says.

Software vendors says they have gotten the message.

“This is a clear case where the perception becomes reality and it has to be addressed seriously,” says Mark Segal, chair of the Electronic Health Records Association, an industry trade group.

Segal says this is an important step towards building standards so more patient data flows freely.

Atlanta is a new hub for video game developers

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00







Normal
0




false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE














































































































































































































































































































































































































/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Asante Bradford promotes video game development for Georgia. Eight years ago, he says, there were only about six gaming companies in all of metro-Atlanta. Now, there are more than 70.

“Every time we put together a list, it changes that quickly," Bradford says. 

He says one reason may be that there are more gaming conventions being held in Atlanta, giving the city more exposure. And there’s a lot of local talent. The Savannah College of Art & Design and Georgia Tech are ranked among the top schools for game design.

Nikhil Deshpande teaches game development at SCAD in Atlanta. He says alumni of these schools are the ones who help create a strong network in the city.

“Retaining talent has helped the overall gaming landscape here," Deshpande says. 

So when it comes time to finding a job, it’s not that hard, he says.

Take Hi-Rez Studios. Its 50 new jobs will help push out a new a mythology-themed video game SMITE on a new platform, XBOX One, and in a new market, China. They also plan to build a new studio so people can watch others play.

 

“People play video games, but over the last two years, it’s actually become quite popular for people to spectate video games," says Hi-Rez Studios Chief Operating Officer Todd Harris. 

Harris says it helps that Georgia’s popular film tax credit – which was just renewed for another three years – extends to digital entertainment, and that living in bigger markets, like San Francisco and Los Angeles, is becoming more difficult. 

“Georgia’s low cost of living has been very effective in recruiting experienced game developers, and then you combine that with really, really strong entry-level talent out of our universities and technical colleges,” Harris says. 

The average starting salary at Hi-Rez Studios is about $58,000 – in line with the national average.  

 





 

 



Normal
0




false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE














































































































































































































































































































































































































/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

 

 

The Art of Selling

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00

When museums face budget cuts, should they turn to their art works for income? For that, we consult Blake Gopnik, art critic and contributor to the NY Times. We talk about the valuation of art, opportunity cost of selling, and what this means for the next generation. 

Click on the multimedia player above to hear more. 

Apple Watch: Day 1

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-04-13 02:00

The much-awaited Apple Watch was finally available for a preview on Friday. Customers could try on the smartwatch in Apple stores in nine countries, including the U.S., China and Japan.

As expected, people made appointments and lined up at Apple’s flagship store in Manhattan—the one on fifth avenue where you walk into a glass cube and down a spiral staircase to reach the store. What was the scene like?

“It was pretty subdued,” said Meg Cramer, producer at Marketplace Tech, who also made an appointment to check out the Apple Watch on the very first day. "There was a line of maybe a dozen people out front waiting to get in. Everyone had made an appointment already.”

What was unexpected was how they were greeted as they walked down the staircase. “This is the weirdest part,” said Cramer. “There were like a 100 apple store employees cheering and clapping.”

The applause continued until the store was full. They were cheering, Cramer suggested, because these customers had been waiting for the Apple Watch for a long time.

“I think if you’re there for the very first appointment on the very first day, you already know more about the Apple Watch than any Apple store employee could tell you,” said Cramer.

Some of the visitors had already pre-ordered the Watch, meaning they had woken up at 3 am to make the appointment just so they could go to the store and try on the smartwatch. Kelvin Hall was one of the lucky few to nab an appointment.

“It definitely does look like something you would wear on your wrist anyway,” said Hall. “I am sure it will take me a little while to get used to using it, but I definitely bought into it with my money as well as my fashion.” 

People might be surprised at how the Appel Watch actually looks, said Cramer, because most similar wearable devices look like “a mix between a watch and a smartphone.”

“The Apple Watch looks cool, it looks fashionable, and I think it looks better than any other smartwatch out there right now,” added Cramer.

But why would someone want to try it on if they had already decided to buy it?    

“It’s just fun to be there,” said Cramer. “I have been following the Apple Watch since the fall, and I am not going to buy one, but I got a little excited holding this piece of technology that one of the most important technology companies in the world has been working on for years and years.”

With A Handshake And More, Obama Shifts U.S.-Latin America Policy

NPR News - Mon, 2015-04-13 01:03

President Obama made history with a handshake of Cuba's Castro at the Summit of the Americas. Beyond that, he tried new engagement with Latin America, moving beyond the drug trade and military action.

» E-Mail This

Pages