National News

Australia: Search For Missing Airliner To Enter 'New Phase'

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 06:19

Prime Minister Tony Abbott says it's time to concentrate on searching the seafloor, but he acknowledges that at this point, it is possible nothing from MH370 will ever be found.

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Breast-cancer survivors and long-term unemployment

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 06:03
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 08:57 Larry French/Getty Images

A recent study found that breast cancer survivors have a high rate of long-term unemployment. The image illustrates cancer survivors that were welcomed before a game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Denver Broncos at M&T Bank Stadium in 2010 in Baltimore, Maryland.

A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Care Center finds that breast cancer survivors have a high rate of long-term unemployment. The specific kind of treatment they get may lower their chances of keeping their job or finding a new job years later.

University of Michigan oncology professor Reshma Jagsi is lead author on the study, published in the journal “Cancer.” She says her team surveyed breast cancer survivors in Detroit and Los Angeles from 2005 to 2007, and narrowed their results to follow the women who were working at the time they were diagnosed.

Approximately 30 percent were unemployed four years later.

“I don’t think too many of us are surprised to hear patients are likely to miss work or even stop working altogether while getting chemotherapy treatment,” says Jagsi. What did surprise her? That women who received chemotherapy at the beginning of treatment had an even higher rate of unemployment four years on. Other studies have found lower levels of long-term unemployment among women who want to keep working after being treated for breast cancer.

Ragsi says knowing the possible long-term implications—on employment and personal finances—might help women and their doctors make decisions about whether to utilize chemotherapy early on in treatment.

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) passed in 1993 protects women who need time off for medical treatment, says Cathy Ruckelshaus at the National Employment Law Project. However: “It basically covers mostly full-time workers,” says Ruckelshaus. “She has to have been there for a year, and she’s entitled to 12 weeks of job-protected leave.” Ruckelshaus says the leave is unpaid, and can be taken intermittently over an extended period (i.e., not in a consecutive twelve-week period) to deal with chemotherapy treatment, side effects or long-term consequences such as fatigue.

If a woman still can’t keep up with a full-time schedule, or needs additional time off for follow-up treatment after her twelve weeks of FMLA are up, she can attempt to qualify for disability. If she can still work, then the Americans with Disability Act might require the employer to accommodate her with a flexible or part-time schedule, or provide the possibility of telecommuting, says Ruckelshaus.

Marketplace Morning Report for Monday April 28, 2014by Mitchell HartmanPodcast Title Breast-cancer survivors face high rates of long-term unemploymentStory Type News StorySyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

Breast-cancer survivors and long-term unemployment

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 05:57

A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Care Center finds that breast cancer survivors have a high rate of long-term unemployment. The specific kind of treatment they get may lower their chances of keeping their job or finding a new job years later.

University of Michigan oncology professor Reshma Jagsi is lead author on the study, published in the journal “Cancer.” She says her team surveyed breast cancer survivors in Detroit and Los Angeles from 2005 to 2007, and narrowed their results to follow the women who were working at the time they were diagnosed.

Approximately 30 percent were unemployed four years later.

“I don’t think too many of us are surprised to hear patients are likely to miss work or even stop working altogether while getting chemotherapy treatment,” says Jagsi. What did surprise her? That women who received chemotherapy at the beginning of treatment had an even higher rate of unemployment four years on. Other studies have found lower levels of long-term unemployment among women who want to keep working after being treated for breast cancer.

Ragsi says knowing the possible long-term implications—on employment and personal finances—might help women and their doctors make decisions about whether to utilize chemotherapy early on in treatment.

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) passed in 1993 protects women who need time off for medical treatment, says Cathy Ruckelshaus at the National Employment Law Project. However: “It basically covers mostly full-time workers,” says Ruckelshaus. “She has to have been there for a year, and she’s entitled to 12 weeks of job-protected leave.” Ruckelshaus says the leave is unpaid, and can be taken intermittently over an extended period (i.e., not in a consecutive twelve-week period) to deal with chemotherapy treatment, side effects or long-term consequences such as fatigue.

If a woman still can’t keep up with a full-time schedule, or needs additional time off for follow-up treatment after her twelve weeks of FMLA are up, she can attempt to qualify for disability. If she can still work, then the Americans with Disability Act might require the employer to accommodate her with a flexible or part-time schedule, or provide the possibility of telecommuting, says Ruckelshaus.

Basketball Analyst Jack Ramsay Dies at 89

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 05:38

Ramsay coached the Portland Trail Blazers to an NBA title before embarking on a long career as a basketball analyst for ESPN. The Hall of Fame coach had been battling cancer.

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Egyptian Court Hands Down 683 Death Sentences

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 04:58

It's the second mass death sentence in just two months in Egypt; however, all but 37 of the 529 people convicted in March had their sentences commuted.

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Rep. Michael Grimm Pleads Not Guilty To Fraud Charges

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 04:43

The New York Republican is facing a 20-count federal indictment, including charges of mail fraud, wire fraud and tax fraud. He turned himself in Monday, and was later released on $400,000 bail.

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Want to buy a Tesla in China? Take a number.

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 04:26

What is it about some products -- Furbies, iPhones, Nintendos -- that get us to wait in line to buy them? In China, the carmaker Tesla is inspiring a queue of its own, a months-long virtual waiting list to buy the Tesla S.

Cao Wenbo, a 36-year-old film producer in Shanghai, joins Morning Report host David Brancaccio to talk about what got him to sign up for the all-electric sportscar. Click on the audio player above to hear more. 

U.S. Announces New Sanctions On Russia Over Ukraine Unrest

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 03:17

President Obama says the U.S. and European partners want the new economic sanctions against Moscow to change the calculus over the situation in Ukraine.

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Killer Tornadoes Rip Through Arkansas, Oklahoma

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 02:35

The most powerful of the twisters touched down north of Little Rock and tore an 80-mile path through the area. At least 17 people have died.

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The difference between coders, programmers and engineers

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 02:31

There's a line in the new HBO show "Silicon Valley" that's making people ask a really basic question: What's the difference between a coder, a programmer and an engineer?

In the show, our hero is Richard Hendricks, a college dropout who works at the software company "Hooli" (which may or may not parody Google) and who has written a valuable algorithm on the side.

In an early scene, Richard is approached by two male co-workers. And under his breath, Richard seems to say "programmers, oh no, no."

The scene puzzled a lot of viewers, including Sid Gidwany, head of engineering at August, a startup in San Francisco.

"I thought that scene was kind of weird because he, himself, is a programmer," Gidwany says.

Hendricks, after all has written his own algorithm, so isn't he a programmer, too? Or maybe he's a coder, or maybe an engineer. Or maybe, because he wrote the program on his off hours, does that make him a hacker?

If you're confused, you're not alone.

Most Americans don't work at software companies, which means most of us have no idea about the distinction between these terms. If there even is one.

"There's not too much of a distinction," says Gidwany. "He can call himself a coder or engineer or whatever."

It turns out that you can indeed self identify as pretty much anything you like if you work in the software business these days.

Coder? You're a shut-in who spends most of his (yes, statistically, you're probably a dude) hunched over a laptop and rarely see the light of day.

Hacker? You're a bit dangerous (or at least you imagine you are).

Programmer? You're proud to be a nerd.

Engineer? You're filling in your Match.com profile.

In other words, you can call yourself whatever you think is cool. But it wasn't always that way. In fact, the distinction is a bit of a throwback, which is why it would make sense if the creator of the TV show Silicon Valley referred to it.

"Mike Judge was a Silicon Valley guy maybe 20 years ago," says Nick Heyman. He calls himself an engineer. I met him and Goodwani at the Founder's Den, a co-working space in San Francisco.

"There was was a big distinction back then," Heyman says. "Now much less."

Godwani agrees. "Especially, late 70s, early 80s," he says. "Companies back then made a distinction between engineers and programmers."

He says, back then computer science degrees weren't offered by a lot of colleges so if you wanted to learn about computers, you would get a more traditional engineering degree.

"Programmers were generally self-taught," Gidwani says. "So a lot of times, there was a distinction of 'I am more formally trained, I am more highly educated.'"

While some big tech companies still reserve the title of "engineer" for people with degrees, college dropouts like Bill Gates and Steve Wozniak, who co-founded Apple, helped disrupt that hierarchy.

And in recent years, new software tools have blurred the distinction even more by enabling people without formal training to build amazing tech products. So now anyone can call themselves a coder, programmer, hacker and even an engineer.

Oh and by the way, that scene in the show where Richard Hendricks recoils at the sight of his colleagues? A number of people told me what actually says is, "Bro-grammers, oh no, no!"

Yeah, who wouldn't be freaked out!

When ads start jumping to the second screen

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 02:21

It’s enough to give advertisers nightmares: more and more people picking up their phones and tablets during commercial breaks and tuning out the ads. (That’s if they’re still watching broadcast TV at all).

"As an advertiser, you're never really sure if the audience that the networks say they're delivering to you actually watch your ads," says analyst Paul Sweeney with Bloomberg Industries.

Now the company Xaxis has developed a product called Sync to reclaim those “lost” TV viewers. It sends complementary ads to the ones you’re ignoring on TV right to websites you’re likely to visit online.

"Oh, you're hearing a commercial for a food company and then, oh, I'm looking at my Facebook and there's a sponsored post there," says Xaxis' Larry Allen.

The big idea: There’s no escape during commercial break.

New York's median rent is $1,100. Seems low...

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 02:18

Rents in New York City are up 75 percent since the year 2000, according to a new report from the New York City Comptroller's office.

"The data from the report is chilling," says Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Since 2000, median incomes are down, but rents are up far more than elsewhere in the U.S. And, there are fewer apartments available to the middle class.

"We've actually lost 400,000 apartments renting for less than a $1000," Stringer says.

But the median rent -- the point at which half of rents are below and half above -- might not be what you think. In New York, it's now $1,100 a month, according to the report.

Anyone who notices New York real estate knows that rent averages are often reported to be much higher. Reis, one company that compiles such data, says it's now around $3,200 a month.

But that number only looks at apartments on the open market. In New York, more than 60 percent of rentals are public housing, or subsidized or rent regulated.

Ryan Severino, a senior economist at Reis, says that can limit supply and, "It can make apartments more expensive for anyone who has to compete in the more competitive market."

And, yet, people keep moving here, far faster than new units are built.

Mississippi's Lone Abortion Clinic Fights To Remain Open

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 01:08

A dispute over a state law requiring abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges goes before the U.S. Court of Appeals. Critics say such laws create a de facto ban on abortion.

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Egypt Sentences 683 To Death In Mass Trial

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 00:25

The cases are linked to deadly riots that erupted in Egypt after security forces violently disbanded sit-ins held by Muslim Brotherhood supporters in Cairo last August.

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How A Public Corruption Scandal Became A Fight Over Free Speech

NPR News - Sun, 2014-04-27 23:37

Monday the Supreme Court hears about a man who was fired after testifying against a state lawmaker. The case on public employees' right to speak out could impact future corruption investigations.

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Test First Before Going For Those Testosterone Supplements

NPR News - Sun, 2014-04-27 23:36

It sounds so simple; slap on a testosterone patch and you're feeling young again. But for many men, the problem may really be obesity or diabetes. Here's how to know.

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Testosterone, The Biggest Men's Health Craze Since Viagra, May Be Risky

NPR News - Sun, 2014-04-27 23:35

Clinics touting prescription testosterone as the answer to low energy and decreased sex drive are proliferating across the country. But these "low T" clinics may be putting men's health at risk.

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Fire-Setting Ranchers Have Burning Desire To Save Tallgrass Prairie

NPR News - Sun, 2014-04-27 23:33

In eastern Kansas, ranchers burn the prairie every spring to bring back grass for grazing cattle. Environmentalists celebrate those fires because without them the delicate ecosystem would disappear.

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Missing Plane's Search Area To Be Expanded

NPR News - Sun, 2014-04-27 21:29

The underwater hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet will be expanded to include a massive swath of ocean floor that may take up to eight months to search, Australia's prime minister said Monday.

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Bad Weather Hinders Search For Ferry Dead

NPR News - Sun, 2014-04-27 21:24

Divers renewed their search for more than 100 bodies still trapped in a sunken ferry. Officials said they've narrowed down the likely locations in the ship of most of the remaining missing passengers.

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