National News

Native Americans Have Superfoods Right Under Their Feet

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:17

Obesity and diabetes rates have soared among Native Americans as sugary, high-carb foods have replaced traditional foods. A study found that 10 wild plants from the Great Plains are highly nutritious.

» E-Mail This

Britain is giving subsidies for rock music

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 09:13
Thursday, June 5, 2014 - 14:09 Earache Records

Savage Messiah – subsidized by British taxpayers. 

In Britain, government subsidies for the arts have traditionally been focused on ballet, opera and theater. But now, they are giving a boost to a rather less exalted area of creativity: thrash metal bands, acid punk and nu-grunge groups.

The aim is to promote British musical talent abroad by subsidising the cost of mounting a foreign tour. The grants – which have so far totaled more than three quarters of a million dollars – have caused outrage in conservative circles and have stirred criticism from low-tax campaigners.

But the recipients have defended the subsidy.

"As a band trying to break through, the cost of touring abroad can be prohibitive," argues Dave Silver, lead singer of the heavy metal band Savage Messiah. The band is getting $25,000 of public money.

Is this sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll at the taxpayers’ expense?

“Absolutely not !” says Silver “ There are strict controls on how you can spend the money. It can only be used for things like marketing costs, tour support, venue costs, international travel and so on.” 

The taxpayer will not be footing the bill for: tattoos, studs, chin spikes or other body piercing… let alone picking up the tab for wrecked hotel rooms and wild parties. Not that Silver indulges in such excesses.

“I don’t actually drink alcohol at all. I don’t smoke. I don’t take drugs. So yeah, we’re pretty well behaved, really," he says.

The bands say they need state aid because they’re losing money from illegal downloads. And the only way to make a decent living is to break through into the live touring circuit. 

The government clearly believes that it’s worthwhile offering a helping hand to up and coming talent and supporting the smaller, independent record labels.

Music is an important export for Britain. The British Recorded Music Industry – a trade body – claims that one in ten of all the albums sold in the United States are by British artists; the figure for continental Europe is one in four. 

None of this cuts any ice with the Taxpayers’ Alliance, a group that campaigns for lower taxes. Political director Dia Chakravarty claims that the touring subsidy is wasteful and  unnecessary. 

“British bands have a long history of breaking overseas markets but that’s because they had great songs to sing, not because of taxpayers’ subsidies,” she argues.

Chakravarty takes a keen personal interest in the music industry. 

“I’ve actually just finished working on my first album of Bangladeshi songs but I’ve supported that by having a day job….working at the Taxpayers’ Alliance,” she says. “I’ve not taken a single penny from taxpayers.”

Oddly enough, her argument against subsidy strikes a chord with Dave Silver. The lead singer of Savage Messiah divides his time between headbanging and studying economics and he’s a real fan of the Austrian School of Economics which favors the free market. So why accept the government grant?

“We’re a band. We’re four people in the band and not everyone in the band is of the Austrian School, so what can we do?" saysSilver. And he laughs: “ Yeah in an ideal world privatize everything that moves  and have no state intervention in the economy. But that’s not where we’re at now. We've got to break into overseas touring.”

Marketplace for Thursday June 5, 2014 Stephen Beard/Marketplace

 Dave Silver - lead singer of Savage Messiah and fan of the Austrian School of Economics.

Stephen Beard.

Dia Chakravarty – Political Director of the Taxpayers’  Alliance and recording artist – unsubsidized. 

 

by Stephen BeardPodcast Title Britain is giving subsidies for rock music Story Type FeatureSyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

Mailman Accused Of Stealing 20,000 Pieces Of Mail

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 08:54

Authorities say a Maryland letter carrier stole Netflix DVDs, along with medicine and other items, including Mother's Day cards. The haul was stockpiled in his house, they say.

» E-Mail This

Are Pre-Existing Condition Bans For Health Insurance Still With Us?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 08:46

Contradictory letters from an insurer spur a health reporter to explore why the implementation of this key health law protection turns out to be more complicated than she thought.

» E-Mail This

PODCAST: The EPA cuts emmissions; Seattle raising minimum wage

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 08:24

The EPA is aiming to cut carbon emmissions from power plants by 30% by the year 2030. Part of the strategy will be to allow states flexibility in how they meet the demand, hopefully sparking innovation amidst competition. Also, Seattle is set to approve the highest minimum wage for a city of its size: $15. Hear why business leaders are actually advocating for the pay raise. Finally, why HELOCs -- a form of second mortage -- are on the rise again.

An excuse for cat pictures all month

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:59

From the Marketplace Datebook, here's a look at what's coming up Tuesday, June 3:

In Washington, the Commerce Department reports on factory orders for April.

A Senate subcommittee on Green Jobs and the New Economy discusses "Farming, Fishing, Forestry, and Hunting in an Era of Changing Climate."

Have you been up to some spring cleaning? Maybe cleaning out the garage to make room for a new car? Automakers are slated to report sales for May.

Read some poetry in honor of Allen Ginsberg. He was born on June 3rd, 1926.

And pet proof your place. June is Adopt-a-Cat Month. That's pretty self-explanatory.

'Drunk Mom' Tackles New Motherhood And Old Addictions

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:48

The title of Jowita Bydlowska's memoir Drunk Mom pulls no punches. She tells Michel Martin about her struggles with motherhood and addiction.

» E-Mail This

'Harvest Of Shame': Farm Workers Struggle With Poverty 50 Years On

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:48

The documentary Harvest of Shame was revolutionary in its raw portrayal of poverty amongst migrant farm workers. NPR's Elizabeth Blair discusses the film's legacy and the state of migrant work today.

» E-Mail This

Google 'Courageous' For Admitting Diversity Problem, So What Now?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:48

Tech giant Google recently owned up to a lack of gender and ethnic diversity amongst its staff. Host Michel Martin is joined by two members of the industry to discuss what it means for the tech world.

» E-Mail This

Should Getting High Stop You From Getting Hired?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:48

FBI director James Comey recently quipped that current marijuana policies make it hard to hire good people. Is this a sign of changing attitudes towards hiring and pot?

» E-Mail This

EPA gives states flexibility in cutting carbon emissions

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:36

The Obama Administration unveiled the first-ever regulation aimed at cutting carbon emissions from existing power plants. The president is using his executive powers to go after the country’s biggest source of carbon pollution.

The draft rule aims to cut carbon pollution from power plants 30% from 2005 levels by the year 2030. The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the rule under the auspices of the Clean Air Act. The proposal also gives states flexibility in how they achieve their cuts.

“It doesn’t tell power plants exactly how to go about reducing emissions. It tells states to figure that sort of thing out,” says Jerry Taylor, who heads the libertarian Niskanen Center in Washington. “So it’s less command and control than one could imagine, but it’s more command and control than most economists would want to see in place.”

To meet their specific goals, the EPA is proposing that states could create compliance plans in which fossil-fuel burning power plants don’t bear sole responsibility for reducing emissions. In other words, states could reduce emissions by creating their own allowance trading programs, partnering with other states, increasing energy efficiency, or using more renewable energy.

The EPA projects that, in 2030, the rule “would result in net climate and health benefits” of up to $82 billion.

Durwood Zaelke of the Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development says the rule won’t solve the climate change problem, but it should spur innovation.

“This is also the best way to get experimentation. It may be that the state of New York, the state of Michigan, the state of California, finds the best way forward faster than another state,” he says.

That innovation, he says, will be crucial to combat climate change in the decades ahead. 

'Times' Reporter Must Testify About Source, Court Decides

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:27

The Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal from James Risen, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for The New York Times. Media outlets had hoped the court would grant greater protection to journalists.

» E-Mail This

L.A. Kings Earn Shot At Stanley Cup With Win Over Chicago Blackhawks

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 07:15

The Blackhawks started off Game 7 with a 2-0 lead, but the Kings won it in a 5-4 thriller in overtime. Los Angeles will host the New York Rangers for Game 1 in the Stanley Cup Final this Wednesday.

» E-Mail This

Chemical Weapons Law Doesn't Apply To Jilted Lover, Supreme Court Rules

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 06:48

Federal laws that were meant to prevent the international use of chemical weapons can't be applied to a woman who tried to poison her husband's mistress, the Supreme Court says.

» E-Mail This

A personal look back at WBOE

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 06:40

WBOE was on the air for 40 years, from 1938 until 1978.  It got its start producing and broadcasting instructional programming for the Cleveland Public Schools. Back then, its broadcast day would mirror the school day, starting at 8 a.m. and ending at 4 p.m. In 1976, the year I began working there, the station was in the process of becoming a National Public Radio affiliate.  

Much of WBOE’s rich history has been preserved, including many 16-inch electrical transcription (E.T.) discs, which were used to record programs before reel-to-reel tape.  These large discs help 15 minutes of audio on each side, and would spin at 33&1/3 rpm.  The programs recorded in the WBOE studios were known as “soft recordings” because they needed to be played back with a tone arm that was significantly lighter than the one used on regular 78 rpm record players of the time. 

Public schools in the district were given special radios that picked up only WBOE’s broadcasts. There were programs for every grade and for every curriculum area.  

Cleveland school teachers, administrators and students were involved in the production of the programs,  most of which were read from scripts.  Some programs were broadcast live and recorded simultaneously for repeat later.  Others were pre-recorded.  Additionally, WBOE used the resources of other radio stations to access educational programming from the major radio networks. 

Imagine sitting in a classroom in, let’s say, 1949, with a film strip or Lantern slide projector projecting pictures on a screen while the narration is heard from the WBOE radio sitting on a table in the front of the classroom. Often a student would be asked to run the projector and advance to the next slide. 

I’ve worked to preserve WBOE’s history for decades, by keeping representative samples of programming and by transferring the 16-inch discs and reel-to-reel tapes to CDs. I have also offered to upload the discs onto the “Historical Archive” site of the CMSD website.  As I’ve listened to what I’m preserving, I’ve found numerous fascinating items, from lessons in the 1940s on dating etiquette to current events lessons covering World War II and more.

Russia's Smokers Must Take It Outside, As Ban Begins

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 06:00

Russian officials say the ban could save 200,000 lives a year in a country known for its heavy smokers. In 2009, the Russian Federation consumed 2,786 cigarettes per capita, a study found.

» E-Mail This

EPA Unveils New Proposal Targeting Greenhouse Gases

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 05:16

The draft proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency has sparked opposition from industry groups who say the changes would be prohibitively expensive.

» E-Mail This

Spain's King Juan Carlos Will Abdicate In Favor Of Son

NPR News - Mon, 2014-06-02 03:31

At a hastily called news conference Monday, it was announced that the 76-year-old king will step down. His 46-year-old son, Crown Prince Felipe, is expected to become king.

» E-Mail This

As home prices recover, banks resume offering HELOCs

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 02:49

Back before the housing market imploded, there was a beast that roamed the streets of suburban America. Its name was HELOC: the home equity line of credit.

When lenders thought home prices would never stop rising, they let homeowners take equity out of their home through a line of credit, which they could use it for all kinds of purchases. But since the crisis, HELOCs -- a form of second mortgage -- have been deep in hibernation. Now, they are slowly waking. And they're hungry.

HELOCs aren't anywhere near as prevalent as they were pre-crisis. But they were up 8 percent in the first quarter over last year, in part because banks are marketing HELOCs to homeowners again.

Home prices are rebounding and the credit market is loosening, but inventories are still low, says Steve Cook, the editor of Real Estate Economy Watch: "So I think one of the things we are seeing now is a lot of homeowners deciding to remodel because now they can."

Andrew Pizor is a staff attorney at the National Consumer Law Center. He says after the financial crisis, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) changed regulation and disclosure rules for traditional mortgages, but not for HELOCs.

"The CFPB said they are going to be working on that down the road, but they haven't gotten to it yet," says Pizor.

Pizor doesn't recommend HELOCs for large one-time purchases, but he says they can be a good option for establishing a long-term line of credit, as long you understand the terms of the loan.

Businesses in Seattle advocate for higher minimum wage

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-06-02 02:45

The Seattle city council is expected to approve a proposal to raise the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour. That would be the highest rate for any large U.S. city, and would tie for the highest in the nation.

Surprisingly, the hike in pay has some unusual backers: leaders in the business community.

“The business community and the Chamber did not come out of the box saying, ‘Hell no. Let’s defeat this,’” says Howard Wright, CEO of the Seattle Hospitality Group. He also represented employers as co-chair of the committee.

Wright and other business-types want to avoid what happened in the nearby town of Sea Tac. When Sea Tac raised its minimum wage to $15 an hour, businesses didn’t have enough time to prepare. In order to afford the new wage law, employers cut benefits and laid off workers.

In Seattle, companies would have more time to get ready -- Small businesses would have up to seven years to implement the higher minimum wage.

Mayors in other cities like Chicago are also talking about adopting a higher minimum wage.

Brookings Institution senior fellow Alan Berube studies income inequality. According to Berube, “Seattle is out front of what is quickly becoming a national trend of big cities looking at local minimum wages as a way of addressing income inequality and keeping their cities affordable for low and moderate income citizens.”

ON THE AIR
Beggar's Banquet
Next Up: @ 12:00 am
Echoes

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4