National News

Tests Of New Ebola Drugs Could Take Place As Early As November

NPR News - 1 hour 22 min ago

New drugs and vaccines can take years to develop. But health officials and researchers are accelerating tests of experimental drugs to fight the outbreak in West Africa.

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Kids And Screen Time: Cutting Through The Static

NPR News - 1 hour 22 min ago

One Los Angeles school is working technology into the learning process, while avoiding the traditional screen-time pitfalls.

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Martha Zarway Of Monrovia: "I'm A Doctor. So We Can't Run Away"

NPR News - 1 hour 22 min ago

The Liberian physician, who operates a clinic in the capital, perseveres in the wake of a colleague's death, possibly from Ebola. She and her staff continue to treat patients.

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European Activists Say They Don't Want Any U.S. 'Chlorine Chicken'

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 23:37

Most U.S. poultry is bathed in a little chlorine on the way to your plate. But that treatment is banned in Europe. Now "chlorinated chickens" are a sticking point in a trans-Atlantic trade deal.

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Vaccine Controversies Are As Social As They Are Medical

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 23:35

In writing her new book On Immunity, Eula Biss found that questions about vaccination touch on attitudes about environmentalism, citizenship and trust in the government.

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Playing matchmaker in Silicon Valley

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-09-29 15:49

One in three couples who married recently met the web. There's sites for every conceivable niche and online dating is a billion-dollar industry. But what about the people who are out there building websites, tech companies and apps?

Sometimes the singles of Silicon Valley need individual help to try and meet "the One," and they're willing to pay top dollar for it.

For the full story, click the audio player above.

U.S. Charges Pakistani Man Of Conspiracy Over His Spyware App

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 15:42

The Justice Department called this the "first-ever criminal case concerning the advertisement and sale of a mobile device spyware app."

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Washington Post: White House Intruder Made It To Doorway Of Green Room

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 13:40

The Secret Service had originally said Omar Gonzalez was apprehended shortly after he burst through the front door after jumping a fence.

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Spanish Court Blocks Catalonia's Independence Vote

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 13:17

Spain's central government in Madrid had appealed to the court to stop the vote, which had been approved with strong support from Catalonia's parliament and local governments.

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At U.N., Iceland Announces Men-Only Conference On Gender Equality

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 12:33

During a speech in front of the General Assembly Gunnar Bragi said the conference would focus on violence against women and would be "unique" because only men and boys are invited.

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Who Will Win The 2014 World Series?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 12:26

If the oddsmakers are right, two Los Angeles teams will be the only ones left standing when the World Series begins in late October. But back east, some fans are pulling for a Beltway Series.

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Silicon: Imagine life without glass

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-09-29 11:49

For the next installment in the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt's microscopic look at the economy: the silicon revolution.

Not only is silicon one of the major components in computer chips, but it’s also found in your windows, mirrors and wine glasses.

"Silicon is the basis of glass," Rowlatt says. "We think of the silicon revolution being computers. But actually one of the very early technological revolutions was glass."

Listen to the full conversation in the audio player above.

 

A Doctor Turned Mayor Solves A Murder Mystery In Colombia

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 11:46

When Rodrigo Guerrero took office, he was shocked by the murder rate. It seemed logical to blame the drug cartels. But his epidemiologist's eye led him to a different culprit.

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4 Years Of Lessons Learned About Drugmakers' Payments To Doctors

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 11:36

American doctors received at least $1.4 billion in payments from drug companies last year. What did the companies get for their money?

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Sandwich Monday: The Pizza Cake

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 11:05

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try the Pizza Cake, which is a fancy way of saying "a bunch of pizzas stacked on top of each other."

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After Fire, FAA Orders Review Of Contingency Plans, Security

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 10:28

On Friday, a contractor intentionally set fire to an FAA air traffic facility that has caused flight delays and cancellations for days.

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More Active Play Equals Better Thinking Skills For Kids

NPR News - Mon, 2014-09-29 10:12

How long can you sit still in a desk? How about your 7-year-old? Maybe you could both use a break. A study shows that kids who get to run around and play after school are better at paying attention.

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This is a generic brand video

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-09-29 10:10

It's the ad that comes before the YouTube video you're trying to watch: a hopeful message from a company trying to sell you on its brand and outlook, usually with no shortage of inspirational imagery and plenty of metaphors.

Kendra Eash captured the language and tone brands use in a piece for McSweeneys.

Listen to the story in the player above with an active imagination (or watch the video) to see what she's talking about.

'Breaking Bad' and Albuquerque: One year later

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-09-29 10:06

AMC's critically acclaimed series "Breaking Bad," created by Vince Gilligan, ran its very last episode one year ago. The show takes place in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and although production has stopped, the town continues to experience an economic boom. Even tourism rates grew exponentially.

In 2013, New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez signed what was called the "Breaking Bad bill" into law, a film incentive that increases subsidies for television crews from 25 percent to 30 percent in some areas of expenditure. The law increases New Mexico's rebate for series television production to 30 percent of a producer's total qualified spend in the state.

"We actually see people that will come here specifically to go and see the sites," says Albuquerque mayor Richard Berry. "I have been as far as Beijing where people have asked me about 'Breaking Bad,' so, yeah, it surely has put us on the map internationally."

Another positive outcome was the number of jobs the show produced. Actors and television producers weren’t the only ones to benefit job-wise from filming, Berry says.

"It’s electricians, the lumber yard selling lumber, and it is craft, and it is the local places that rent their businesses out to film," says Berry. "It really hits our economy from top to bottom."

"Breaking Bad" has a spinoff show called "Better Call Saul," also created by Gilligan, and also set in Albuquerque. It is scheduled to premiere in February 2015.

The show has already been picked up for a second season.

 "When 'Breaking Bad' filmed here, almost $70 million came into our economy," says Berry. "We think that 'Better Call Saul' is going to be another great opportunity for us."

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